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    • Adams, Thomas Boylston
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    • Adams, John Quincy
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    • Jefferson Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Thomas Boylston" AND Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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I intended to have written to you when at your own house or Office in Boston, but was prevented by the intense severity of the weather , added to the general ill health of both your & my family, during the whole time we sojourned under your Roof, which, by the assiduity of your wife & Catharine and the faithful attendance of their domesticks was made, in every respect, our own house . My...
I received your favor of the 30th: ult. on the 7th: current and also the pamphlet containing the documents respecting the Chesapeake. I have read the whole with attention, and am particularly impressed with the concluding letter of Mr: Madison, which is universally admitted to be a very luminous and correct State paper. That it could not be answered or refuted, is very apparent from the...
Although I have recently written you a letter of some length, I will not therefore refrain from a prompt acknowledgment of your favour of March 12th: which particularly deserves my thanks for the variety of intelligence it contains, of a nature not to be derived from any other source. The detail you have given of the various intrigues supposed to be in operation at head quarters and elsewhere...
I have received from Messrs: Curtis & Adams to whom I sold your Wood near the Mill pond, the amount of price agreed for; viz $160.0. for forty Cords which it turned out on measurement. I am now some what perplexed with your farm, as well as my own. My Tenant says I must consider him this year, since times & prospects are so dull and no market for produce, and I expect the greater part of your...
I received, Yesterday your favor of the 6th instant, for which I thank you. The letter, which upon mature consideration, I burnt, as I informed you in the cover of a letter from my Mother, sent a few days ago, was on the subject of the proposed alteration of the Constitution, as to the tenure of judicial Offices; but my ideas upon paper Suited me less than when they were revolving in my mind,...
You have been lately gratified with such copious communications from this quarter, that I have been the more remiss in mine, not wishing to encumber you with too much matter at once. We have read your Report to the Senate in the case of Mr: Smith, and the printed documents together with Mr: Smith’s vindication; but the volume of evidence communicated by the President I have not seen, and am...
I returned from Dedham on Friday morning, and found your letter of the 14th. The Court of Common Pleas dispatched business rather faster than usual, on account of Christmas; but there was business enough left unfinished to have occupied a day or two more. I am glad to find you are satisfied with my sale of your wood—I believe, no body has done better since, though sundry lots have been...
Your letter from Washington of the 27th: ult: to our dear Mother, came to hand this day; and as She was in Boston, we had the first perusal of it. We learn from it with much pleasure your Safe arrival at the end of your journey and that you and yours are in good health. In return for this intelligence I am happy to be able to acquaint you with the health of all our friends here and your...
When Sunday comes I usually enquire whether I have any arrearges to make up with my correspondents; if I have, it is to me the most convenient season for discharging such debts. Though I have, at present, no letter unacknowledged, I have a variety of documents and journals from you, which deserve mention, because they serve as a substitute in some degree for letters, which we know you have not...
The trial of Mr. Selfridge begun on Tuesday last and finished on Friday. I attended nearly the whole time and as it may be some time before the trial will be published, it may be interesting to you to learn some of the particulars from a Spectator. The evidence on the part of the Defendant was opened by Mr: Gore in a very handsome style and the law as applicable to the facts which he expected...