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    • Claiborne, William C. C.
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    • Madison, James
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    • Jefferson Presidency
    • Jefferson Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Claiborne, William C. C." AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Your letter of the 12th. Ultimo (covering copies of the orders of the Secretary’s of War & of the Navy relative to the deserters which had been forcibly taken from the District of Baton Rouge) has been received; & in reply to a late letter from Governor Grand Pré, in which he expressed a Solicitude, to learn the orders of the President, relative to that transaction , I did on the 11th....
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 24 January 1806, New Orleans. “I have the honor to enclose you a Copy of a statement made me on Oath, by Stephen a free black man; I do not credit it in whole; I however, have no doubt, but that the free people of Color have been tampered with, and that some of them are devoted to the spanish Interest. “Mr. Morales is yet in this City, and should I not an [ sic...
§ From William C. C. Claiborne. 5 July 1805, New Orleans. “In a former Letter, I advised you of the departure of Captain Carmick for Pensacola with a communication from me to Governor Folch upon the Subject of the Post Road through West Florida. Captain Carmick was detained much longer than was expected, and has returned without Governor Folch’s Answer. A Copy of Captain Carmicks Letter to me...
21 April 1804, New Orleans. “I have nothing interesting to communicate, nor would I write you by this mail, were it not to inform you, that the most perfect good order prevails in this city. I find, the most trifling occurrences here, attract attention to the Northward, and that a disposition exists among some people to give to certain events a consequence they do not merit: To prevent...
I shall set out for New-Orleans in two Days, & expect to arrive there on or before the 18th. Instant. Tyler who stands charged with the Crime of Treason, is said to be in the Opelousas District; I have given orders for his Arrest, & will have him conveyed to the Hon’ble the Judge for the District of Orleans, who will I presume order him to be sent to Richmond. John Smith of Ohio, is at Batton...
7 April 1804, New Orleans. “I have received an answer to the letter which I addressed to the Marquis De Casa Calvo on the 28th. ultimo; a translation of the answer and of the documents accompanying it are preparing, and when completed, the originals shall be transmitted to you. It seems La Coquette was fitted out at this place, and was permitted to depart after the receipt of assurances from...
I have been duly honored with the receipt of your letter of the 20th. Ultimo, and am happy to find that my correspondence with the Governor General of Techus, relative to fugitive Slaves, is approved. I am in daily expectation of receiving an answer from Governor Salcedo, and if my propositions are acceded to, I will endeavor to procure the passage of a Law as advised by the President....
I this moment met with the enclosed letter from Mr. Matthew Lyon to his constituents, and I sincerely hope it may be the only Copy that has reached this city. As a Western man, I feel myself under no obligations to Mr. Lyon for his boasted zeal for the Western interest, and although I am not disposed to question the purity of his motives, I am firmly persuaded, that during the last Session, he...
21 September 1804, New Orleans. “From the great havock which the diseases of this Climate, have recently made among Strangers, and the frequent embezzlement of the property of deceased Persons by unprincipled Men, I have been induced to make special provision for the care of the Estates of certain Intestates. A Copy of my Ordinance in this subject is enclosed, and I hope it will meet the...
5 February 1802, Natchez. Encloses copies of his 29 Jan. letter to General Wilkinson and Wilkinson’s reply. Hopes the request he made of the general was not improper but fears the peace of the territory is precarious, “surrounded as it is, by numerous Indian Tribes, and with a Population of Negroes, nearly equal to the number of Whites, … and it seemed to me advisable, to have the Spare Arms...