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I have the honour to send you enclosed the copy of a convention which I have signed with Lord Hawkesbury concerning the 6. & 7. Arts. of the Treaty of 1794—As the discussions which led to this Result were begun and conducted under your instructions, I feel it to be my Duty, as well as a mark of Respect that is due to you, to send you this Copy by the same opportunity that I avail myself of, to...
On the 16th of last month the King of Great Britain sent a message to Parliament announcing the termination of the discussions with France, and calling on them to support him in his determination to employ the power & resources of the nation in opposing the spirit of ambition and encroachments of the Government of France. Letters of marque had been issued against France, and I conjecture that...
Both as a friend and a father I do most unfeignibly participate and condole with you in the heavy affliction that has fallen upon your family. It would be altogether vain for me to have recourse to the usual Topics of consolation, in so severe a Calamity: it must be sought for among the treasures of your own Mind, which nature has so eminently endowed; and after a while, it will likewise be...
By Dr. Romayne I send you a pamphlet lately written upon the interesting subject of the public credit of this Country. The author is a member of parliament an old & practical Banker, Brother to the president of the Bank of England, and for many years much conversant with the great money operations of the Country. When you have read it I wish the favour of you to send it together with the other...
As I know of no measure from abroad, which is capable of such extensive and injurious effects as the cession of Louisiana and the Floridas to France, it has been a subject of my unremitted solicitude and attention from the moment of our first suspicions concerning it. Its importance was fully and repeatedly developed to the Ministers of this Country before the conclusion of the Preliminaries,...
By the Treaty of Alliance concluded at Paris in 1778, between the United States of America and France, with the Exception of New orleans the latter renounced for ever the possession of every part of the Continent of america lying to the East of the course of the River Mississippi. This renunciation, confirming that which had been previously made in the Treaty of 1763, between Great Britain and...
[ London, July 23, 1802. King’s description of this letter reads: “General Hamilton. Determination to return home &c.” Letter not found. ] Rufus King’s “Memorandum of private Letters, &c., dates & persons from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
I have received your obliging letter in duplicate of June —enclosed I have now the pleasure to send you a copy of my letter to the Secretary of State resigning my mission, and requesting to be relieved in season to return home in may next. In a few days I purpose to avail my self of the leave of temporary absence which I have received to visit the continent. My plan is to go to Holland, and...
I wrote to you two days ago by a private ship, as the Packet goes in a day or two I avail myself of the Opportunity to inform you that I have sent to the Secy of State my Resignation, and requested to be relieved in time to return home in April next. As there is reason to apprehend that we may be at war with all the barbary powers, as well as morocco I have asked for a Passage home in a...
After further enquiry, I annex little credit to the notice posted at Loyds’, that two american vessels had been carried into Algiers. Two vessels the Franklin morris master, and the Rose (master not known) said to be of Philadelphia, are reported to have been taken by the cruisers of morocco or some other of the Barbary Powers. These are also the vessels which are mentioned at Loyds as having...
Mr. D. Ogdon called upon me a few minutes past, and as I understood from him that he purposes writing to you by the mail of this Evening, I think it proper, in order to avoid any misconception of the tenour of our conversation to repeat to you the purport of what I said to him. viz. “Whether it will be expedient to offer a federal candidate for the Govr. is a point upon wh, from the want of...
Since my letter of the 24th. I have recd. yrs. of the same date; and after maturely reflecting upon the subject, and consulting one or two of our friends here I am confirmed in the Sentiment that I ought not to consent to be a candidate for the Govr. shd. the federalists think of offering me. This being my determination, it is right that I shd apprize you of it, in order that our friends may...
Owing to the continuance of the King’s illness, the change of the Ministry is still incomplete, and very little business, beyond the ordinary routine, is transacted. It is supposed to be on this account that no measure has been adopted in consequence of the Prussian Note avowing the King’s accession to the Northern Confederacy, the Principles of which, according to every appearance, are to be...
Tho’ the King has recovered, he does not yet hold a Court, nor is it understood that he attends to any but the most pressing and indispensable business. The chief of the new Ministers are in their places, and all of them will be so in the course of a few days. The Duke of Portland remains in the Home Department: Mr. Addington, the late Speaker, is at the Head of the Treasury, Lord St. Vincent...
In confirmation of the rumours of the day, Carnot’s answer to Bailleul, published during the Exile of the former, states the Project which had been discussed in the Directory to obtain from Spain a cession of Louisiana and the Floridas. A reference to that performance, copies of which I at the time sent to the Department of State, will shew the manner in which it was expected to obtain the...
The unexpected occupation of Hamburgh by the Danes, and the Treaty between France and Naples have nearly completed the exclusion of the Ships of England from the Ports of the Continent: if the King of Prussia take possession of Hanover, as it is believed he will do, the Ems and the Weser will in like manner be closed; and as Portugal is unable to resist the measures employed against her, the...
12 April 1801, London. No. 10. Encloses copies of correspondence with Lord Hawkesbury about seizure of American vessels carrying articles of Spanish origin to Spanish colonies. Decree from Vice-Admiralty Court at Nassau regarding the case of the Leopard is the first document precise enough to use as grounds for a remonstrance. Suggests that these copies be published in American newspapers as...
14 April 1801, London. No. 11. Last mail from Hamburg brought news that British fleet has taken its station off Copenhagen. British property in Hamburg and Altona has been sequestered. Prussian troops have marched into and occupied Hanover. A courier has arrived from St. Petersburg with news of death of Czar Paul and accession of Alexander; he is reported to bear dispatches for British...
Annexed I have the honour to send you a copy of my Correspondence with Mr. Anstey upon the Subject of the British Debts. Reference may be had to numbers 93 & 98. of the last series; the former inclosing Copy of a Paper delivered to Lord Grenville on the 23. of November 1800, as a commencement of the negotiation, and the latter explaining his Lordships reasons for devolving on Mr. Anstey the...
21 April 1801, London. No. 13. Transmits, by way of Samuel Sitgreaves, copies of his correspondence with Lord Hawkesbury. Believes a settlement of the debts owed to British merchants would have been already concluded had former ministry remained in office. Under Secretary Hammond has told him that he wished question of debts settled on terms mentioned in King’s dispatch no. 6. Addington has...
25 April 1801, London. No. 14. Notes that British fleet bound for Denmark passed under Swedish guns that held their fire. Reports Nelson’s exploits at Copenhagen. Believes British government dissatisfied with armistice because Danes have not left armed league. There is much speculation concerning the character and views of new Russian czar, whom British hope to detach from the league. Issue in...
26 April 1801, London. No. 15. Received instructions several months ago to procure jewels as present for bey of Tunis and had estimated cost at £7,000 sterling. That part of presents consisting of silk and woolen cloth (valued at over £1,000) has been sent to Eaton by Maw-hood and Co. Jewelry is being prepared by Rundel and Bridges to be finished in June, about the same time as the guns and...
Having learned that the Law which prohibited our commercial intercourse with France had ceased, and judging that great numbers of our Vessels would be immediately cleared out for the different Ports of that Country, and probably, among others, for Ports in a State of Blockade, I wrote a Note to this Effect to Lord Hawkesbury, and requested that immediate Instructions should be given to the...
15 May 1801, London. No. 17. Reports that Lord St. Helens has sailed for negotiations with Russians on the subject of a northern confederacy. Since French influence remains strong in St. Petersburg, believes British may have more difficulty than they expect. Conveys word of British victory in Egypt. Acknowledges receipt of 6 May letter from Dawson, then off Start Point. Dawson reached Le Havre...
Though Captain Pellew of the English Frigate Cleopatra was recalled, as I sometime ago informed you, Admiral Parker, who commands on the Halifax Station, and whose conduct has in other instances been exceptionable in not restraining the plundering spirit of the Officers under his Command, permitted him to proceed to the West Indies instead of returning to England. For this disobedience, joined...
25 May 1801, London. Introduces Prince Ruspoli, officer in the Order of Malta, who comes recommended “by our Countryman Mr. West.” RC ( DLC ). 1 p.; marked private.
Since the date of my letter communicating Lord Hawkesbury’s sentiments respecting the Debts, I have seen and conversed with Mr. Addington, who told me, that he had called up the subject in the Cabinet as he had before assured me he would do, and that he had expressed his solicitude that it should be brought to a decision; adding, that as the question, from it’s nature and circumstances was not...
Annexed I send you the copy of a letter which I have just received from Lord Hawkesbury on the subject of the Depredations upon our Trade in the West-Indies. As there can be no objection to it’s publication, you will perhaps think it advisable to have the Letter and it’s enclosures printed in our news papers, by which means it will reach the West-Indies, and be seen by those whose abuses it...
8 June 1801, London. No. 21. Reports George III sufficiently recovered from illness to tend to public business, but not “with his former assiduity.” Believes French position in Egypt increasingly precarious and British relations with northern powers improving. Suggests that Swedes and Danes willing to secure for the U.S. “by Treaty every limitation of the Right of Search, which England might...
I have lately received a letter from Genl. Allen enclosing one to me from the Department of State, respecting his cause depending in the Court of Appeals. Without adverting to what passed in the early Stages of this Suit, it is proper that I should mention my having introduced the General to Messrs. Bird Savage & Bird, for the purpose of his engaging them to become his Bail, for the value of...