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26 April 1801, London. No. 15. Received instructions several months ago to procure jewels as present for bey of Tunis and had estimated cost at £7,000 sterling. That part of presents consisting of silk and woolen cloth (valued at over £1,000) has been sent to Eaton by Maw-hood and Co. Jewelry is being prepared by Rundel and Bridges to be finished in June, about the same time as the guns and...
20 March 1802, London. No. 59. Reports that Bird, Savage, and Bird will send to the Treasury Department the accounts for the Tunisian present and encloses copies of his letters on shipment of the articles. Has had no word from Hargreaves since he left Algiers; in early February Eaton was temporarily in Leghorn for his health. Nothing decisive has occurred in the negotiations at Amiens, but...
As my mission abroad had no other connexion with the money department of our Govt. than wht. arose from the payment and receipt of my annual appointments, I made it a point carefully not to have the custody, or to become accountable for any money belonging to the public. Hence I have concluded that I have no accounts to settle with the treasury. But as however this department keeps the accts....
5 July 1802, London. No. 71. Reports that the loan recently obtained by the Dutch government at a rate of interest “hitherto unknown in that frugal and industrious Country” has “excited a good deal of curiosity.” It is believed that part of the loan, in the amount of 15 million guilders, has been paid to France to secure release from the claims of the Prince of Orange, pursuant to the separate...
27 February 1802, London. Within the past ten days, some persons have begun to question whether the Amiens negotiations would end in a definitive treaty. Does not share this opinion and points out that prolonging the negotiation would harm British financial and commercial interests. Can only deal in conjectures as to the discussions at Amiens but is confident “they bear no resemblance to the...
20 August 1801, London. No. 30. Conveys word from Murray and Dawson that exchange of ratifications has been completed in Paris. Encloses letter from Eaton with latest information on situation at Tunis. Refers to previous statements of his reluctance to execute Eaton’s orders. RC ( DNA : RG 59, DD , Great Britain, vol. 9); letterbook copy ( NHi : Rufus King Papers, vol. 54). RC 1 p.; marked...
[ London, July 23, 1802. King’s description of this letter reads: “General Hamilton. Determination to return home &c.” Letter not found. ] Rufus King’s “Memorandum of private Letters, &c., dates & persons from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
Since my letter of the 24th. I have recd. yrs. of the same date; and after maturely reflecting upon the subject, and consulting one or two of our friends here I am confirmed in the Sentiment that I ought not to consent to be a candidate for the Govr. shd. the federalists think of offering me. This being my determination, it is right that I shd apprize you of it, in order that our friends may...
The news Papers, among which is the Porcupine, the Paper of the new opposition, which Mr. Dawsons repeated disappointments enable me to add to those I had before delivered to him afford a pretty just view of the public Sentiment concerning the peace. Mr. Sheridan, in a single sentence has happily expressed this sentiment: “It is a peace every body is glad of, and no body proud of .” Of the old...
23 April 1803, London. No. 92. Refers to his dispatch no. 87 [25 Mar. 1803] , which mentioned the difficulty that had arisen regarding the proceedings of the commissioners under article 7 of the Jay treaty. “Several Conferences have since taken place between me and Lord Hawkesbury, but the Impediment is not yet removed. At my first meeting with Lord Hawkesbury, after the communication he had...
18 December 1802, London. No. 77. The language and measures of the British ministry during October produced “no beneficial effect” upon the French government. “The temper then manifested, had it been persisted in, would have involved the Nation in a new War. But the tone was soon lowered: the orders supposed to have been given to retain certain Possessions … have been recalled, and with the...
Preliminaries of peace between France and Great Britain, were signed last night at Lord Hawkesburys office. With perfect respect & Esteem I have the honour to be Sir Your ob: & faithful Servt: RC ( DNA : RG 59, DD , Great Britain, vol. 9); letterbook copy ( NHi : Rufus King Papers, vol. 54). RC docketed by Wagner.
The Receipt of my dispatches will have apprized you of my arrival. For the moment I am engaged in the arrangements which the Settlement of my family require—as soon as I find a leisure moment I will prepare and send you the promised Supplement to my last dispatch, tho I really have nothing of importance to add. I do not recollect whether it has been the usage for our Ministers to proceed to...
Lord Whitworth was ordered to leave Paris on the Evening of the 3d. instant, unless the French Government should have signed a Minute by which it should be agreed that the English should continue the Military possession of Malta for ten years; that the Island of Lampidusa should be ceded to them for ever; and that the French Forces should be withdrawn from Holland. On the morning of the 3rd....
19 July 1802, London. No. 73. Reports receipt of 25 June letter from Commodore Morris at Gibraltar announcing Morocco’s “unexpected declaration of war” on U.S. Has notified U.S. consuls in Great Britain so that American ships might be forewarned. Does not know why “this unjust Proceeding has arisen,” having “no exact information either concerning the internal condition of Morocco, or of the...
War seems more and more probable, indeed it appears to me inevitable: Holland will be involved, and Spain and Portugal must obey the commands of France. The day after the Kings Message to Parliament was communicated to the French Government, Bonaparte delivered to Lord Whitworth a paper (a copy of which I have seen) stating: 1. That the Expedition preparing in the Dutch Ports, was, as all the...
I left London the 18th. and sailed from Cowes the 21st. of last month—on the 16. the King sent a message to Parliament announcing the termination of the discussions with france, the Recall of the English ambassador from Paris, and that the french ambassador had left London; and calling upon Parliament to support “him in his determination to employ the Power and Resources of the Nation in...
In answer to your Letter of the 24 inst. I have the honour to state that no engagement was ever made by me that the long Bills of the Proctors shd. be paid. In consequence of an instruction that I gave to the agt. Mr Bayard to require that the proctors Bills shd. be regularly taxed, several of them came to me, to represent what they called the usage on this subject, and to urge me to...
15 May 1801, London. No. 17. Reports that Lord St. Helens has sailed for negotiations with Russians on the subject of a northern confederacy. Since French influence remains strong in St. Petersburg, believes British may have more difficulty than they expect. Conveys word of British victory in Egypt. Acknowledges receipt of 6 May letter from Dawson, then off Start Point. Dawson reached Le Havre...
28 March 1803, London. No. 88. “My No. 86. [19 Mar. 1803] communicated the tenour of Lord Hawkesbury’s Note of the 15. to the French Ambassador: the conclusion of the Note refers to the demand of France for the evacuation of Malta and declares ‘that the King cannot consent to its evacuation unless substantial security be provided for those objects which in present circumstances would be...
13 March 1802, London. No. 58. Reports there is no further information on the negotiations at Amiens since his last letter. In a “ free conversation ,” Addington “ yesterday told me that during the last Fortnight his mind had balanced whether to wish the conclusion or rupture of the negotiation ” but that the British were ready to sign a definitive treaty “provided it be done without any...
30 July 1801, London. No. 28. Believes French invasion of Great Britain unlikely despite military preparations on both sides. Has heard nothing from Egypt. Reports that Sweden has agreed to British-Russian convention; expects Denmark soon to follow suit. Relays report that Tripoli declared war on U.S. 14 May. RC ( DNA : RG 59, DD , Great Britain, vol. 9). 2 pp.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by...
28 February 1803, London. No. 82. Acknowledges JM’s letters of 16 and 23 Dec. 1802 . “By Lord Hawkesbury’s desire, I have conferred with Colo. Barclay respecting the continuation of the Boundary through the Bay of Passamaquoddy who has made no objection to the line we have proposed, tho’ he appears to think that it would be improper to cede to us the Island of Campo Bello unless the cession...
26 May 1802, London. No. 68. Reports anxiety among British manufacturers and merchants “founded upon the Belief that France would exclude, either wholly or in a very great degree,” British manufactures. “The prohibitory Laws of France passed during the War have been declared to be in force, and were it not for a recent and extraordinary Law which puts into the hands of the Chief Consul,...
9 February 1802, London. No. 52. States that the definitive treaty is not yet signed but preparations are being made to reduce the war establishment. Virtual annexation of Italian Republic by France will not impede peace with England, and neither Austria nor the rest of Italy has a voice at Amiens. The size of Great Britain’s peacetime establishment is unknown, but it will be larger than...
By the Treaty of Alliance concluded at Paris in 1778, between the United States of America and France, with the Exception of New orleans the latter renounced for ever the possession of every part of the Continent of america lying to the East of the course of the River Mississippi. This renunciation, confirming that which had been previously made in the Treaty of 1763, between Great Britain and...
At length I am enabled to send you a Convention which I yesterday signed with Lord Hawkesbury, respecting the VI & VII. articles of our Treaty of 1794. The commutation of the 6. article of the Treaty of 1794, and the confirmation, so far as respects its future operation, of the 4. article of the Treaty of Peace remain as they were settled in October last, and I have nothing to add to my former...
Herewith I enclose the Letter of the Comee. of the Senate, together with my answer to yr’s of the 4. Should it still be thought inexpedient to ratify the Convn. without farther Explanation I should think there would be no objection on the part of G. Br before the delivery of the Ratifications, to exchange with Mr Monroe a dec[larati]on that the Conn. was concluded without Reference to the...
After further enquiry, I annex little credit to the notice posted at Loyds’, that two american vessels had been carried into Algiers. Two vessels the Franklin morris master, and the Rose (master not known) said to be of Philadelphia, are reported to have been taken by the cruisers of morocco or some other of the Barbary Powers. These are also the vessels which are mentioned at Loyds as having...
26 November 1802, London. No. 76. Notes that Gore has acknowledged letters received from the State Department during King’s absence and informed JM of what has been done toward accomplishment of the president’s instructions. “I shall immediately resume the business that has been so well commenced, and as well from the nature of the subject, as from the temper and disposition that are...