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Your letter of the 5th. instant came to my hands yesterday afternoon, and the mail will depart in two hours. On the rect. of it, I went to the house of Mr ——s brother in law, where he lodges when here, but find he has not returned, and is supposed by his friends in this place to be yet in Washington. I suppose he may have gone from thence to Norfolk, Baltimore or Philada. where he has...
In the course of my reflexions on the subject on which I had the honor in my last letter respectfully to address you, it has occurred to me, that it is in my power to submit to you an unsought and decided evidence of public opinion in a republican circle. I beg leave to assure you, that the original letter to me, from which the inclosed is faithfully extracted is in my possession. It will...
The idea I lately took the liberty to suggest may have appeared visionary and strange, but on much reflexion I am convinced that it is the interest of the United States that such a measure should be adopted either by the Government, or by the mercantile interest varying the form of course so as to render it proper for them. I beg leave to submit the reasons. We are now dependent upon one...
21 April 1804, Purveyor’s Office. “I have taken pains to procure information whether I could obtain a number of sets of the laws upon more favorable terms than those of Mr. Carey. The retail price has been $2 ⅌ vol, or $12 ⅌ set. I think it was high. Books of equal cost to the printer are retailed at $2 for the thickest volumes and $1.50 for the thinest, or $10.50 for the set of 6 volumes. The...
H. Miller. Muhlbg No. 1. H. M. Supervisor of the Reve. Latimer No. 2. The collector of the Customs, Phila. Mc.pherson N. 3. The naval officer, Philada. Jackson N. 4. The Surveyor of the port of Phila. T.Ross } Coxe Ashe N. 5 The
I add to the paper No. 1 the two inclosed papers. You will excuse their rough form and the crudity of some parts. I will indeavour to add further remarks on the other Articles. This afternoon a federal merchant called on me and mentioned that a respectable French Merchant, who he named, had informed him that he had seen a letter from France to a friend here, stating as follows, that an action...
I find it to be a fact, that a family connexion of a person, who accuses ABurr, expresses his conviction that the accuser is the worst man of the two. I find it is considered here that the accuser has fears about the contents of a port-folio possessed by Mrs. . I find it asserted that a paper has been sent from the south, since the receipt of the letter in cypher, wch. paper is in the hand...
It is manifest to every person, who reflects on the affairs of the United States, that the present season rather offers a new, than a defective mass of commercial advantages. The acquisition of a large monied capital, and of a universal credit, public & private, have relieved us from the British monopoly, or at least afforded the sure means and this is a revolution in trade . To give activity...
Cotton The present crisis again draws into consideration the important agricultural production which is the subject of the inclosed pages. It is the interest of the United States to consider at this juncture, the domestic means of supply. If war is to ensue, or the principle of our non importation law is to be maintained or extended, manufactures are rendered proportionally necessary to our...
The situation of the United States has become very uncomfortable, and presents disagreeable prospects as to revenue, internal order & harmony, foreign trade, supplies and the maintenance of peace. It is a time for every honest latitude in the freedom of discussion. When public authority is present and entirely respected , the faithful and well disposed citizen may disclose his hopes &...
7 June 1805, Philadelphia . “Shortly before Mr. Adams[’]s mission of Messrs. Gerry, Pinckney & Marshall to France my solicitudes to avoid a quarrel with that country brought into my mind many considerations, which I was anxious to communicate to the government. I wrote an ingenerous but respectful letter to Mr. Adams, of which I have some where the rough draught, and inclosed in it the paper...
I wrote you a note by yesterdays mail, without signature, date of place or year, putting at foot "le premier de Mars" . Its contents were serious and confidential. The lady is Mrs. Alston. The person at New Orleans Genl. Wilkinson. In addition it is reported that Dr. Bolman mentioned among his friends here that the cypher was of 18 months standing, & known to a foreigner. Since I have been...
Under all the circumstances of the times, in Europe & America, the tendency of things to the promotion of despotism & to the extinction of civil liberty cannot fail to awaken the solicitudes of all, who love this country. Our principles, our peace, our internal order and our property are all afloat on the sea, which military power ruffles and calms at pleasure. In this state of things, I have...
1) On the State of external affairs in February 1807. Every faithful and reflecting friend to the peace, liberty and prosperity of this country must consider the present time as uncommonly and extremely serious, in fact & in expectation. Specific suggestions of public conduct are uncommonly interesting in the present distracted, and infuriated state of the world. Our conduct should exhibit a...
Mr. Jacob Meyer, who was lately our consul in French St. Domingo is going to Washington upon some business, and has requested me to give him a letter to you in whose department the affair lies. I remember Mr. Meyer, when living with Mr. Pettit of Philada. from whom he expects to take a letter to Mr. Gallatin, and I suppose Mr. Pettit, and his sons house of Pettit & Bayard must know more of Mr....
I take the liberty of mentioning to you that I am informed Genl. Muhlenberg has given to one of the assistants in his office a declaration on writing, that he is willing to retire from the Collectorship. Under this circumstance, I hope it will not be deemed indelicate in me to ask the honor of your consideration as a candidate for such vacancy. As the office has a direct relation to the...
I had the honor to furnish you lately with some Abstracts (in my hand writing) from a paper mentioned in my unsigned letter; and since I sent you a cover with the name (in my hand writing) of the person who wrote the paper. It was my intention to follow the two with such a letter as this; that you might know on my responsibility the existence of such a paper, and the name of the writer. I have...
To James Madison, Esquire, Secretary of State the memorial & petition of Tench Coxe, a citizen of Philadelphia in the State of Pennsylvania. Your Memorialist respectfully represents that he has been frequently and seriously impressed with the manifest inconveniencies & disadvantages constantly arising to the people of the United States from the practice & necessity of bottling, corking, wiring...
A british armed brig of 10 guns, & I believe about 250 Tons has been this afternoon crippled & dismantled in this port. She was loading with provisions, flour, fish &c and German Linens and goods as is said. The measure was the result of the present public feeling. Her name is the Fox, Capt. Wainwright. The popular opinion was that she was going to the British ships with provisions, but I...
I wrote by the mail of last evening in reply to your letter of the 17th. that the two places might not be left unattended to. The offer made to me, certain parts of your letter & a publication in the Washington Intelligencer , I think of the 12th., have caused serious reflexions in my mind. I am perfectly acquainted with the sentiments of Pennsa. on one side & I think well informed on the...
I have the honor to inclose to you an extract from a letter from Silas Dinsmore, Indian agent of the U. S for the Choctaws & Post Master in that quarter, tho I do not know the name of the office. It is dated at Natchez Jany. 4th. and bears the post mark of that place of the 6th. The letter was occasioned by his having some instruments in a ship from London, after mentioning which he concludes...
From a desire to cultivate the public interests and honor of the United States I prepared, soon after Mr Randolph’s resignation, the enclosed paper. It was candidly placed in the hands of Mr R’s successor. It will be perceived that it was studiously qualified so as to meet the prepossessions, some signal expressions of which Mr P. had suffered to escape him. It might be made a much stronger...
I observe that the death of Judge Patterson of New Jersey is announced in the papers of this day. I trust that I am influenced more by public than by personal considerations, in bringing into the view of the Government the name of my brother John D. Coxe of this city. He was during a number of years President of the first district of the Common Pleas of this state, which station has been...
In the letter I had the Honor to address to you on the subject of the packages of books and stationary sent to Pittsburg, I mentioned one for the Indiana Territory, which does not appear there, and which Mr. Hooke does not remember to have forwarded to that Government. He desires to know whether his rect., given to his Predecessor Mr. Brownson, for the packages in Store, when he was appointed,...
Letter not found. 7 May 1804. Mentioned by Coxe in his docket of JM to Coxe, 3 May 1804 , as a letter informing JM of 149 copies of the laws of the U.S. shipped on 5 May.
It has appeared to be of great importance to public impression to get the inclosed (Chaps. 66 &ca) into a paper read by the federal bar, trade &c: More a revision of the case of the Siberia Loan, it appears that the turn of expression should be varied, but the substance is clear & strong. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
An eminent Merchant of this city has lately communicated to me some information upon the subject of the India trade. In doing this he furnished me with a note upon that part of the British treaty which relates to it. I have the honor to enclose the paper, and to refer the last paragraph of nine lines to your consideration. There is a question of some importance, whether the two years run from...
When your message to the legislature announced the idea of the abolition of the internal revenues, I presumed that it was after such examination of the subject as would give rise to the same idea among the members of Congress. I expected therefore the abolition of the little office on which all my income depends. I find from communications from several of the members, and the debates of the...
Note on the act of the President of the United States of the — of — 1801. relative to the internal Revenues . By the constitution of the United States (Sect. 8 art. 1) it is ordained, that all duties imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the U.S. All the internal revenues have been collected in the N.W. Territory, as well as in Virginia, Pennsa. or Massachusetts. It was discovered,...
When I had the honor to write you upon the subject of an appointment, I did it with great reluctance from the numerous suggestions of names & applications that must necessarily embarrass and distress you. I will not suppress the expression of a consciousness, that I have undergone the most injurious and severe trials in the public service as a citizen lately, and before as an officer. My...
A small addition is proposed to the note by the mail of monday & wednesday from Pha. to Washn. The subject is of deep importance. It does not proceed from the vanity of suppose [ sic ] that any thing can strike here, which will not occur there. Any dangerous views towards this country are most practicable where there is a particular description of people. We are obviously most vulnerable...
§ From Tench Coxe. 29 November 1805, Philadelphia. “I am honored with your letter relative to the copies of the two patents to Mrs. Rebecca Blackwell and Mr. Geo. Fende or Fead. I have just recd. the originals and I take the liberty to transmit them for the purpose of being forwarded to the proper officer or officers, whether register or commissioners. I will take the necessary measures for...
Mr. Coxe has the honor respectfully to submit to the inofficial perusal of Mr. Jefferson, a part of a series of papers, which he has sent to a Washington News paper, which have a material relation to public affairs. They contain a proportion of matter published in a former crisis, with considerable additions arising out of present circumstances. It is a serious & painful truth, that gazettes &...
I have been requested to transmit to you the papers in relation to Mr. William Griffith Montgomery, which I have now the honor to inclose. His father is one of that numerous body of natives of Ireland, whom the American war of 1775 found here. He took an active part in the revolutionary contest to its close. His mother was a native of this city, a sister of Dr. S. P. Griffith’s and a niece of...
I have sent to our greater seaports from New Orleans to Portsmouth N. H. to different friends, copies of the dispatch on impressment. You will see from the enclosed paper how seasonable the important contents of that paper are. It is true that many circumstances will induce men of all parties to support our opposition to G. B. whether of war, or less seriousness. But every day convinces me...
British blockade by mere notification-- Russian--do. Not to produce a fall of the blockade plan but to annoy the adversary belligerent & to defend the distant subjects of the blockade, including neutral ports. Both before Nov. 6. 1806. Berlin & Milan Rety. Decree DLC .
The recent advices from Europe have produced effects upon the mercantile body, of which I presume you will hear inform. The insurance offices from Massachusetts to Pennsa. have manifested solemn feelings. It is useless to trouble you with comments upon an act, which you better understand & have more maturely weighed than I. The avowal of the principle of retaliation on the part of the Empr. of...
3 April 1804, Purveyor’s Office. “As I am not possessed of the account of Mr. Stevens, and am uncertain whether it is your wish to include the bill he drew upon me I shall be much obliged by an explanation of your wishes. My Sales & the net proceeds could be rendered, and paid over instantly. I shall write Mr. Stevens upon the subject and beg the favor of your instructions. “It is discovered...
I find myself greatly impressed with the idea of the recent inroad of G. Britain upon neutral rights. If a whig Administration treats us & neutrals in general thus, we are to expect nothing from a change of men in their Administration. If we submit to this measure it is to be presumed that something equally extravagant will follow from the other side. The example of outrage tolerated from one...
An original letter from a house of the first character in Liverpool, of the 7th. Ulto. is now in my hands. It mentions that "the import of cotton from the East Indies, has amounted, in 5 Mos., & 7 days of 1807, to 49.213. bales, and that a further importation from the same quarter into G Britain will take place from September to Decemr., of 50.000 bales more, that the present use of India...
The temper of the two great combinations of European powers towards each other at this time is worthy of Consideration. The Combination against France in 1793 & that in 1805-6, considered a connexion or intimacy with France as a sufficient inducement to include the intimate power in the list of states to be marked with Jealousy and injury. So France considers our Treaty of 1794 with Jealousy &...
Ca. 11–16 Apr. 1805 . “I have the honor to write to you in consequence of an application from Mr. Clement B. Penrose, who is desirous of an appointment in the Louisiana Territory under the Government. He is a gentleman of about 34 years of age, married, his [ sic ] several children, and is a branch of two old and respectable Pennsa. families. He read law about eighteen months under the late...
The great importance of the Florida and Louisiana Business has occasioned me to trouble you with some extracts from a considerable french Geographical work of 1741, which was reprinted in 10 or 12 Volumes 1767, after the French Cession of Louisiana. I believe the Spaniards in office here are very uneasy at the expressions in the report of the Comme. of the Reps. lately made public with respect...
The account of the death of the late worthy collector of this port will probably reach you with this letter. I hope you will excuse me for submitting my name as a candidate for the office. Having before had the honor to make such an address, I will not trespass upon your valuable time by presenting to your consideration the grounds of my respectful application. I will confine myself to the...
3 February 1804, Purveyor’s Office. Has just acknowledged receipt of the U.S. treasurer [Thomas Tudor Tucker]’s order for a sum which agrees with that mentioned in JM’s 28 Jan. 1804 letter. “Mr. Stevens’s bill has not yet appeared.” “The Sal ammc., Lac &c were sold on the day advertised. I have sent twice for the vendue account, but have not received it. When I shall obtain it the necessary...
Knowing the attachment to freedom and humanity, which mark your character I feel a solicitude to bring into your view the Situation of the people of Ireland in the United States. You will not understand that I recommend any measures in regard to them or their unhappy country. But, if any in Authority here have forgotten our engagements of 1775, if they have denied them the proferred rights of...
18 June 1805, Philadelphia . “On my return from a short visit to my family, I had the honor to receive your letter of the 11th. instant. I did not expect any immediate benefit to the U.S. to follow my communication of the paper in my last, yet I felt a disposition to trouble you with the perusal, because I had some reason to believe that the paper with the letter, which accompanied it,...
The subject on which I have lately exposed my sentiments to you is so important in itself and so influential in its consequences, that I am led to continue some attention to it. In Paulsons Amern. daily advertiser of this city of the 17th. inst. there is a proclamation of the Russian Adml. Henry Bailey, in which confiscation is held up as the consequence of infractions of the general Blockade...
I hope the communications I have taken the liberty to make on the subject of Colonel Burrs affair have not been inconvenient. Tho’ only reflexions (, or little more) on what was known they appeared to me to promise utility. The exertions and vigilance of the government command the approbation of candid opponents, and comfort the friends of our public principles. If Mr. Burr is without foreign...
I have this day the honor of your respected favor of the 21st. instant. Permit me to assure you, Sir, that it is a cordial to my bosom, that the observations on naval power, No. 2, promise, in your judgment, public benefit. Our country wants all the zeal of its good citizens to nurse and defend its minor state in a season when the adult nations are so irregular, and excessive; and this is my...