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A Treaty of Amity & Commerce between the United States of America & his Majesty the King of Prussia having been arranged with the Baron de Thulemeyer his Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary at the Hague specially empowered for this Purpose and it being inconsistent with our other Duties to repair to that Place ourselves for the Purpose of executing & exchanging the Instruments of Treaty, we hereby...
I have received your Favour of the 23. and I hope e’er this time the Baron has received Orders to Sign in both Languages. This is a favourite Point with me; but yet I would not make it a Sine qua non. I would urge it with decency, but give it up at last if it could not be [avoid]ed. Our Treaty with France is in English and French. That with [Ho]lland is in English and Dutch, and neither made...
I have rec d. from M r: Jefferson a copy of his letter to you of the 1 st. ins t: & agree fully with him in sentiment that we should agree to consider the french column as the Original, if the Baron thinks himself bound to insist upon it; but if the practice of his Court will admit of the execution in the two languages, each to be considered as equally original, it would be very agreable to...
The inclosed letter came to my hands a few days ago from Mr. W. Nelson, with a request that I would forward it. Being apprehensive that no opportunity may soon offer, of sending it by a French packet, I make use of a private conveyance which I hope will be equally safe and more expeditious. By the same conveyance you will I understand be furnished with a commission for taking depositions in a...
I have been sensibly obliged by your favor of the 23. of March which arrived by the last Packet. I had previously received from Mr. Jefferson information concerning the dislocation of his wrist, and the remedial journey which he had projected. His friends are particularly interested and none more than myself in his recovering the entire use of a member, without which they must lose the...
I offer you my sincere acknowledgments for your two favors of May 7th. and Augst: 1. The latter has been rendered particularly valuable by the acquaintance it has afforded me with Monsr. Crevecoeur who has already verified the character under which you present him. The paper which I inclose for Mr. Jefferson will shew you the result of the Convention. The nature of the subject, the diversity...
[ Annapolis, 27 Nov. 1783 . Entry in SJL reads: “W. Short. Foreign arrangement— Shelton’s Skelton’s affairs—Martin—Western cession—importance of establishing interest in Congress-residence of Congress-instructions on that head—Patsy’s situation.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 19 Dec. 1783 . Entry in SJL reads: “W. Short. 1st. hope desperate—2d doubtful—to dispose of P. C. [Peter Carr]—call on Key for money and conveiance.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 29 Dec. 1783 . Entry in SJL under this date, immediately following entry for preceding letter to Bernard Moore, reads: “W. Short. do. for the Nottoways.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 18 Jan. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Short. P. C. [Peter Carr] disapproving Wmsbg—approving Jmscy [James City] but query as to healthfulness—refer to him—subject in cypher—Nicholas—health better.” Not found. TJ evidently enclosed in this letter a cipher based on the word “Nicholas,” a cipher he used in subsequent letters to Short. In an undated extract of his letter of 30 Apr....
I am sorry my letter found you so much indisposed, and still more so that it should have added to your sufferings. But you must learn to bear these things by always calculating on the possibility of a cross as well as pyle and having a plan of reserve to turn to by way of comfort. I can yet add nothing more on the subject. Nine states appeared on the floor to-day. But eight of them are...
[ Annapolis, 9 Mch. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Wm. Short. European news—Philada. station.” Not found.]
[ Annapolis, 18 Mch. 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “W. Short. Affair with Gilliam.” Not found, but see Short to TJ, ca. 10 Mch. 1784 .]
[ Annapolis, 16 Apr. 1784. Entry in SJL reads: “Wrote answer W. Short to be num[quam] non par[atus]—Morris’s bills fate unknown—try to get remittance by last this month—Luz[er]ne taking [leave].” Not found.]
Whether Congress will keep ministers abroad is still undecided. A disposition however seems to prevail to add to the present commission for negociating foreign treaties of amity and commerce. One of our own delegates and one other gentleman have proposed the mission to
[ Annapolis, 7 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Short. In cypher.” Not found.]
Since the departure of the post an event has taken place which obliges me to send this by express in hopes of overtaking him at Marlborough. Congress have to day added me to the commission for negotiating treaties of commerce with the European powers. This was hastened by the receipt of a letter by this day’s post from Dr. Franklin which gives reason to beleive that Mr. Jay is on his passage...
I inclose you a letter from l’Orient. When are we to see you? Your letters leave us in doubt whether you mean to protract this odious term of the 4th. of April, or to return to your quarters then and be content to go on with your French at leisure. I am in hopes this will be your choice. You lost much by not attending the Te-deum at Notre dame yesterday. It bids defiance to description. I will...
Another packet is arrived which sailed from N. York the 22d. of March. As yet we have only a few letters which come through the post office. We have reason to expect there is a passenger from New York and that he may have letters for us. We know that Mr. Adams is appointed minister to the court of London, and a Colo. Smith his Secretary of legation. The newspapers tell us that Rhode island has...
By your servant I inclose you a bill of the Caisse d’escomte for two hundred livres. We have received this day some public letters from America. These contain a permission to Doctr. Franklin to return, and a substitution of myself in his place. There is no appointment of a Secretary of legation, but I suppose it out of doubt that Colo. H. will be annexed to this legation. Smith is fixed in...
I must beg a thousand pardons for not having sooner answered your kind enquiries after Patsy’s health . I was yesterday out the whole day, therefore scribble a line just as I am setting out to Versailles this morning. Her indisposition was slight, occasioned by a cold. The cold still remains, but the headach, and slight fever have left her. If we make an appointment to meet you at all it will...
A Treaty of Amity and Commerce between the United States of America and his majesty the K. of P. having been arranged with the Baron de Thulemeyer his Majesty’s envoy extraordinary at the Hague specially empowered for this purpose and it being inconsistent with our other duties to repair to that place ourselves for the purpose of executing and exchanging the instruments of treaty, we hereby...
I have been duly honoured with the receipt of your separate letters of Aug. 23. and should sooner have returned an answer, but that as you had written also to Mr. Adams I thought it possible I might receive his sentiments on the subject in time for the post. Not thinking it proper to lose the occasion of the post, I have concluded to communicate to you my separate sentiments, which you will of...
Your letter of the 9th. came to hand yesterday. I wrote to you on the first instant, by the post which was to leave Paris the next day and should have arrived at the Hague on Tuesday the 6th. That you did not receive it then can have proceeded from no other cause than the infidelity of the post office in opening letters and detaining or suppressing them altogether. I receive very few which do...
Finding the assistance of a private Secretary necessary in my office I would wish you to accept of the appointment. In this case it will be necessary for you to abandon your plan of continuing at St. Germain’s. I need not detail to you the ordinary business in which you will be engaged. That will open itself on you of course. But it is necessary for me particularly to authorize and instruct...
I have duly received your favor (of no date, but I suppose by the company it was in that it was about the 17th.) and thank you for the intelligence it contains, and particularly that of my daughter’s health. Colo. Humphrey’s letter came to hand at the same time. Ere this I hope he has received mine inclosing one to Mr. Jay which I sent by the first post after my arrival here. We had a cold...
Since my last, which gave you reason to expect I should leave this place tomorrow, I find I shall not be able to get away so soon. Nor can I indeed fix a day; tho’ my expectations are that it will not be many before I shall leave it. Your’s on the subject of the prisoners came safely to hand. I shall be obliged to you if you will write, as of your own motion, to enquire what will be the amount...
Je suppose que pendant l’absence de son Excellence Mr. Jefferson mes Lettres sont toujours ouvertes par Mr. Humphrys comme Secretaire de la Légation, et les Incluses pour N. York, après avoir été lues et extraites si on le juge à propos, fermées et acheminées par la voie directe de France, sans passer par le Royaume voisin, où je suis expressément requis par ceux d’ici de ne point faire passer...
J’ai l’honneur de vous adresser l’incluse pour le Congrès, toujours ouverte, ainsi que celles qui suivront, afin que S. E. M. Jefferson ait la satisfaction à son retour de voir ce que vous jugerez à propos d’en noter ou extraire pour le tenir au courant des affaires de ce pays. Je suppose, Monsieur, que vous savez ce que c’est que l’ Ouverture dont je parle dans l’incluse . Mais il est de mon...
Cette nuit part pour Paris Mr. le Rh. Gr. de Salm, chargé d’affaires les plus importantes pour cette Republique et pour la France. Il aura la bonté de vous remettre une Lettre de ma part. Il auroit bien des choses à dire à S.E. Mr. Jefferson. Je l’ai averti qu’on étoit absent, mais qu’il pouvoit s’ouvrir à vous en toute confiance, comme s’il le faisoit à Mr. Jefferson lui-même. Celle-ci est...