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    • Lee, Henry
    • Lee, Henry
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    • Madison, James
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Documents filtered by: Author="Lee, Henry" AND Author="Lee, Henry" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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By way of introduction of a correspondence, with a character I love & respect so sincerely, I enclose a report passed yesterday by Congress, the only material business done lately & which proves the dreadful situation of our fœderal government. The report speaks so fully on the subject that I withhold remarks which might [my?] solicitude for the public gives birth to. We have received some...
In our letter of this date to the Assembly you will know our sentiments on the interesting subject of finance. I am persuaded if the suggestions meet the approbation of the Legislature and any plans calculated on the principles of our letter, should be properly executed much good will accrue to the state. We omitted one subject which involves the respectability of our country viz that of a...
You now have the report from the secretary of war mentioned in my last letter & omitted. The opinions I conveyed then relative to the eastern commotions are daily supported by additional intelligence. The eastern gentlemen here are confirmed in sentiments on this matter and beleive that the discontents will never be settled but by the sword. Perhaps their apprehensions may have some operation...
Letter not found. 11 November 1786. Mentioned in JM’s letter to Lee of 23 November 1786 . Concerned Lee’s sense of injury at being dropped by the Virginia legislature from the state delegation to Congress, and the “deriliction of the friendship” between JM and Lee because of JM’s being elected, so Lee thought, in his place ( Lee to JM, 20 Dec. 1786 ).
After the notification of my disgrace which reached me about the 20th. Novr. I hastened from N York & pressed forward to my home. Every difficulty of weather and roads opposed my progress and retarded us effectually, for it took us three weeks to reach this place which I had reckoned on accomplishing in twelve days. At Length we arrived on the banks of potomac, and thro our avidity to embrace...
Having a few moments only to devote, you must be satisfied with a very laconic letr. Such is my distance from the line of posts, that to use it, I must avail myself of accidental conveyances, which are often like the present, sudden. It is with real Grief I inform you that by a late vote of the assembly of Virga. on a collateral question, they have manifested hostility to the new constitution....
I am so far on my return from a visit to Richmond. On my route I spent a day with Judge Pendleton. He continues amidst the strange change of opinion on the worth of the fœderal Government, unalterable. This firmness does not belong to all the bench, for it was declared as indubitable, that the Cheif Justice had abandoned his first sentiments on this subject. I wished to have given you a...
To aid Mr. Twining I put my name on his bill & procured the endorsement of Mr. Constable to authenticate it in N York. Mr. Twinings bill is not paid by the Postmaster General who gave me his written assurance that it should be paid when due on condition that the contract was performed relating to the mail. This letr. Mr. Constable has & you can see. I am called on for the money & without the...
This letr. is written purposely to inform you of the project mentioned to you in New york concerning the land at the Great falls. The quantity is 500 acres, the price may be called 4,000£ with the incumbrance of an annual rent of 150£ sterling. The advantages infinitely exceed that of any spot of ground in the U. States. The canal runs thro the land, & the bason is in the land, the situation...
I wrote to you when I was here last month relative to our project of union in the purchase of the great falls. To this letr. I have as yet received no reply. Mr. Arthur Lee tells me that he left you in Philada. unwell. With respect to the suggested purchase I am more & more persuaded, that it is worthy of our best attention, & that judicious conduct of the business will ensure to us early,...
My business has yet detained me here. Three days ago I returned from a visit to the great falls where Genl. Washington was to have met me. The rain stopped him & the other directors, which to me was a mortifying disappointment as I entertained hopes with their aid to have concluded amicably & advantageously the dispute with Mr Fairfax. This is in train, tho the prospect is not the most...
I had presumed from the decision you have taken of standing for your district, that I might have seen you here before I left this town, But as the hour of my departure is approached & my expectation baffled, I now transmit to you for your satisfaction a plot of the canal with Col. Gilpins (one of the potomack companys directors) observations. This gentleman speaks from personal knowledge &...
I am so far on my return from Richmond to Alexa. at which place Mrs Lee still is. The attack which commenced when you was in Alexa. has been very severe & her condition when I last heard from [her] was very unpromising. It may so happen that I shall be detained in Alexa. during the winter, tho’ my hope & intention is to return soon home. Have you recovered my packet with the plan of the canal,...
The papers necessary to our European project are enclosed herewith—viz my power of attorney, your remarks which are so full that I can add nothing, the old plot of the canal which must be kept by you, and a copy sent, it being not fit—& my letr. to Mr. Jefferson. The last explains fully the manner which appeared to be best for us to embrace, but should any thing be improper, you can pass it...
Tomorrow I go from hence, Mrs. Lee as when you left her. If I forgot to fill up the power of attorney, please to insert Mr Jeffersons name. Yesterday the original papers went off in the Maryland bound to Bordeaux to the care of Mr. Mason Merchant there—I am told in three or four days the mail reaches Versailles from that port. Many applicants above & here, on each side of the river have waited...
Whenever I ask your aid to the promotion of the wishes of my friend, receive it on this express condition, that the public good must combine with the views of the gentlemen recommended. Very happy in the appointent [ sic ] of my old fellow soldier Lindsay to the vacancy occasioned by Mr. Parkers election, I desire only to entreat your attention to his compeer Mr. M. Livingston, should it be...