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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Lincoln, Benjamin" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I was favored last evening by yours of the 20th Ulto and am glad to be confirmed in the idea that a spirit of unanimity is becoming still more prevalent. My having company with me at present & my being occupied with my private concerns, will be considered by you as sufficient reasons for my writing in a laconic manner. I will therefore reply to the principal scope of your letter with all that...
Your two letters of Decr 20th & Jany 4th are before me. I am much obliged to you for the intelligence contained in them: because it enabled me to contradict a report, in circulation among the Antifederalists, that your State had made choice of only one Representative to Congress, that no more would probably be appointed, & that every thing was in very great confusion. Though facts will...
I have but this hour, received the Letter you did me the Honour to write me, on the 30th. Ult.—Enclosed in haste are a Letter to Mr. Jefferson and another, to a Friend who will be equally glad to see Mr. Jones. I am much obliged to you for giving me this opportunity of doing this little Service for your Friend and only wish it was of more importance, both for your Sake and his, being with very...
Your letter of the 25th of last Month, accompanying the political letters of Mr Adams, came safely to hand; and I have to acknowledge my obligations for both those favours. There is good sense in the answers given by Mr Adams to the questions of Doctr Calkoen, combined with an extensive knowledge of the interests and resources of this Country. If there be in some instances an exageration of...
I have been lately favored with the receipt of your letters of the 24th and 30th of September, with their enclosure, & thank you sincerely for your free & friendly communications. As the period is now rapidly approaching which must decide the fate of the new Constitution as to the manner of its being carried into execution & probably as to its usefulness, it is not wonderful that we should all...
I received with your letter of the 9th instant, one from Mr Minot and also his History of the Insurrections in Massachusetts. The work seems to be executed with ingenuity, as well as to be calculated to place facts in a true point of light, obviate the prejudices of those who were unacquainted with the circumstances & answer good purposes in respect to our government in general. I have...
I beg you will accept my thanks for the communications handed to me in your letter of the 3d instant. And my congratulations on the encreasing good dispositions of the Citizens of your State—of which the late Elections are strongly indicative. No one can rejoice more than I do at every step taken by the People of this great Country to preserve the Union—establish good order & government—and to...
I have now to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 19th of March, which should have been done at an earlier period had any thing transpired in these parts which was worth communicating. I can now, with pleasure, inform you that the State of Maryland adopted the proposed Constitution last monday by a very large majority; this you will undoubtedly have announced by the publick papers...
I have to acknowledge the reception of your favor of the 24th of Feby; which I have delayed answering till this time in expectation of being able to give you some information of what will probably be the determination of this State, upon the Constitution; but the proceedings of New Hampshir, so directly opposite to what we had reason to hope for, from every account, has entirely baffled all...
Your favor of the 20th Ult., and the papers accompanying it came duly to hand; I believe none of your letters to me have miscarried as I have received the Gazettes containing the debates of your Convention very regularly. I am sorry to hear that the issue of the proposed Government in New-Hampshire is, in any measure, dubious: Our accounts from that quarter have been favorable in the highest...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your three letters of the 3d 6th & 9th int. The information conveyed by the last was extremely pleasing to me, tho’ I cannot say it was altogether unexpected, as the tenor of your former letters had in some measure, prepared me for the event, but the conduct of the minority was more pleasing and satisfactory than could have been looked for from the debates....
As you must be convinced that whatever effects your happiness or welfare cannot be indifferent to me, I need not tell you that I was most sensibly affected by your letter of the 20th of January. Yes, my dear Sir, I sincerely condole with you the loss of a worthy, amiable & valuable Son! Altho’ I had not the happiness of a personal acquaintance with him, yet the character which he sustained,...
Your favor of the 9th instt came to hand last evening. As you know what ever concerns your happiness & welfare cannot be indifferent to me, you will very readily believe me when I assure you, that I take a feeling part in your anxiety and distress on account of your Son, and most sincerely wish for his recovery. I thank you, my dear Sir, for your observations upon the advantages which might...
Ever since the disorders in your State began to grow serious I have been particularly anxious to hear from that quarter; Genl Knox has, from time to time transmitted to me the state of affairs as they came to his hands; but nothing has given such full & satisfactory information as the particular detail of events which you have been so good as to favor me with, and for which you will please to...
I have, I think, seen your name mentioned as President of the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of Massachusetts. For this reason I give you the trouble of the enclosed address. I hope your wishes were fully accomplished in your Eastern trip. Are your people getting mad? are we to have the goodly fabrick that eight years were spent in rearing, pulled over our heads? What is the cause of...
Inclosed is a copy of my last to you, soon after writing which I heard of Doctr Gordon’s sailing. Not knowing who his Agent is, I again take the liberty of putting under this cover, the second Bill of exchange for him; & the original subscription paper on which the eleven pounds arose as part of the Bill (just mentioned) for forty two pounds which was the amount of both the Alexandria &...
As Doctr Gordons departure for England is an event that was to have taken place about this time & may have happened I take the liberty, in that case, of requesting the favor of you to do what shall appear right with the inclosed Subscription Paper & Bill. I will make no apology for the trouble this request may give you as I persuade myself your inclination to serve the Doctr will keep pace...
The violent rains, and consequent freshes, have given such interruption to the Stages in this part of the world, as to prevent your favor of the 15th Ulto getting to my hands till Saturday last. I accede to the sum of Two hundred Dollars in addition to the stipulations mentioned in my last, as compensation for Mr Lear’s Services a year; and shall be glad to receive him into my family as soon...
Your favour of the 4th of Jany never reached me till yesterday, or the receipt of it should have had an earlier acknowledgement. Let me in the first place thank you for your kind attention to my enquiries. And in the next, pray you to learn, precisely from Mr Lear, upon what terms he would come to me; for I am not inclined to leave matters of this sort to after discussion, or misconception....
Not until within these few days have I been favored with your letter of the 18th of Octr introductory of Mr Porter. I beg you to be assured that I shall have pleasure in shewing him every civility in my power while he makes this region the place of his residence—as I shall to any other, to whom you may give letters recommendatory. A few days ago I received from on board some vessel in the...
I am favored with your Letter of yesterday respecting Mr Taulman of the Sappers & Miners. I am not able to give any possitive opinion whether or not that Gentleman is entitled to the Commission he sollicits—the very small number of Men in the Corps renderd it not necessary to fill any Vacancies in the Officers—his claim therefore, must rest on what has been the practice in the Corps in Similar...
As the Gentlemen who are now remaining of my family, propose to honor me with their Company to my Ho. in Virginia & will of course need a little of their Pay, you would oblige both them & me, if you could devise a method by which three or four Months of it could be obtained. I am Dr Sir Yr Most Obed. & Affe Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I return you the Subsistence Roll of the Officers of the Hospital Department. Dr Craik having retired does not I dare say expect to be continued on the list—As to the rest it is impossible for me to judge of the necessity of their services—some of them might doubtless be dispensed with—I will write immediately to the Director General on the Subject and transmit you his Answer so soon as I...
Being perfectly of the same sentiment with you respecting the Invalids now at Philadelphia I have given directions to Baron Steuben to have them Inspected immediately in order that no time may be lost in carrying into execution the measures you Recommend I am &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.