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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I did not receive your Letter of the 8 th , untill the day before yesterday.— That I have not Seen with Pleasure, Approbation or Indifference, the Introduction into America, of So great an Innovation, as an order of Chivalry, or any Thing like One, or that has a Tendency to one, is very true. that I have been violent against it, is not So. I am not a violent Man. I have disapproved of this...
I received in Season, the Letter mentioned in yours of the Second of this Month, but as there was nothing in it which required an immediate Answer, I have not acknowledged the Recipt of it, untill now. If an Express should be upon his Passage with any Arrangement of Congress, respecting their foreign Affairs I presume the Departure of M r Jay and M r Laurens for America, will disarrange it: So...
I took the Journey leisurely, and arrived here on Thursday and had the pleasure to learn that Colonel Smith had arrived the evening before, which relieved me from an anxiety, as I wished to have him with me at the Commencement of operations as well as to have all the Papers before me. I have found this Gentleman possessed of all the good Qualities which you and Col o. Humphrys, who knew him...
I have received your favour of the 30 th. Ult o. and thank you for the extract enclosed— The Commerce of new England will follow their oil, wherever it may go and therefore I think it good Policy, in the Controller General to take of the duty— But there is another object of Importance I mean the sperma Cæti Chandles— Will you be so good as to inform me whether these are prohibited in france?...
I am very glad to learn by your Kind favour of the 9 th. that Boylston has sold his oil to sangrains Correspondent because this will both shew the Bostonians that a Markett may be found in france, much better than in England, & the Parrissians that this oil is much better & Cheaper than any other M r. Barretts Contract bids fair to compleat the business & to introduce a regular Exchange of...
I send you by M r. Joy, all the writings which have fallen in my way, against the slave trade— I mentioned your Desire to read, whatever you could find upon that subject to M r. Granville sharp who requests your acceptance of what he has written upon that subject— you may not Know the Character of this Gentleman, He is the Grand son of the famous Archbishop sharp, very amiable & benevolent in...
I am much obliged to you for your kind Letter of the 16 th. I most heartily wish you success in your endeavours to introduce a benificial Commerce in Tobacco, oil, Timber & all other things, between the U.S. & France, L d. G. G.’ s attack was easily repulsed, The Ministry will not be so easily managed, in one word, I will let you into the whole secret, They think, that whatever wealth or Power...
Your kind favor of the 5 th. of this month is just now brought to me, & I beg leave to reciprocate to you & your amiable family all your obliging wishes— the latest accounts from the massachusetts assure us of a returning tranquility, altho the spirit of sedition in the County of Worcester was not wholly suppressed— I have no doubt it will all soon subside. With equal surprize & satisfaction I...
M r Nathaniel Barret of Boston will have the Honour to deliver you this Letter. His Character and Connections are very good, and his long acquaintance with Commerce qualifies him particularly for the Business entrusted to him, which is the proposition of M r Tourtille de sangrain, relative to our sperma Cæti Oil. as that is a Child of your own you will natureally have affection enough for it to...
I have received your favour of the 30 th. Ult o. and thank you for the extract enclosed—The Commerce of new England will follow their oil, wherever it may go and therefore I think it good Policy, in the Controller General to take of the duty—But there is another object of Importance I mean the sperma Cæti Chandles—Will you be so good as to inform me whether these are prohibited in france? or...
I am very happy to learn by your favour of the 12 th. that M r. Barrett, is in a fair Way to make a Contract between the Merchants in Boston and Mess rs. Le Couteule & the first Houses in y[thorn sign] e french sea ports, whereby a Channell may be opened for an Exchange of Oil & Chandles for french Merchandizes—this Plan, I am very sure may be matured into something very agreable & equally...
I am very glad to learn by your Kind favour of the 9 th. that Boylston has sold his oil to sangrains Correspondent because this will both shew the Bostonians that a Markett may be found in france, much better than in England, & the Parrisians that this oil is much better & Cheaper than any other M r. Barretts Contract bids fair to compleat the business & to introduce a regular Exchange of...
I send you by M r. Jay, all the writings which have fallen in my Way, against the slave trade—I mentioned your Desire to read, whatever you could find upon that subject to M r. Granville Sharp who requests your acceptance of what he has written upon that subject—you may not Know the Character of this Gentleman—He is the Grand son of the famous archbishop sharp, very amiable & benevolent in his...
I am much obliged to you for your kind Letter of the 16 th. I most heartily wish you success in your endeavours to introduce a benificial Commerce in Tobacco, oil, Timber & all other things, between the U.S. & France, L d. G. G.’ s attack was easily repulsed, The Ministry will not be so easily managed, in one word, I will let you into the whole secret, They think that whatever wealth or Power...
Give me leave to introduce to you Colonel Trumbull, a son of the late Governor of Connecticut, He is a Painter who has given Proofs of uncommon Genius & Talents for his Art, and is disposed to consecrate both to the Glory of his Country—He has already finished Bunkers Hill and Quebec, and is proceeding to saratoga & York Town, and I hope will not stop, till he has finished all the principal...
I thank you for your Letter & the Proceedings of Anvergne. The Provincial assemblies if they act only as Councillers of the King must operate for the benefit of the Nation—Le mombe dis personnes roisses dans les deux premmiers Bliss ne prinsse superior le nombre des personnes choisies pour a liers etats et les viox sevat recuilles par tete, alternativements entre les membres des differents...
At length my Dear Marquis I am become a private citizen on the banks of the Potomac, & under the shadow of my own Vine & my own Fig tree, free from the bustle of a camp & the busy scenes of public life, I am solacing myself with those tranquil enjoyments, of which the Soldier who is ever in pursuit of fame—the Statesman whose watchful days & sleepless Nights are spent in devising schemes to...
I have no expectation, that this Letter will find you in France. Your favor of Novr to me, & of Deer to Congress, both announce your intention of making us a visit this Spring. On this hope I shall fully rely, & shall ardently long for the moment in which I can embrace you in America. Nothing could add more to the pleasure of this interview than the happiness of seeing Madame la Fayette with...
It is now, more than ever, I want words to express the sensibility & gratitude with which the honor of your felicitations of the 26th of Decr has inspired me. If my expression was equal to the feelings of my heart the homage I am about to render you, would appear in a more favourable point of view, than my most sanguine expectations will encourage me to hope for. I am more inclined therefore...
The Society of the Cincinnati in a general meeting, of delegates from the respective States now held in this city, have had before them the letters which were addressed by you to the President. The measures you have taken to fulfill the intentions of the society are proofs of your attachment, and obligations on the Society. The permission of his most Christian Majesty for His Generals, &...
If my expression was equal to my sensibility, I should in more elegant language than I am Master of, declare to you my sense of the obligation I am under for the letter you did me the honor to write me by the Marqs de la Fayette, & thanks for this flattering instance of your regard. The pleasure I received in once more embracing my friend could only have been encreased by your presence, & that...
The peregrination of the day in which I parted with you, ended at Marlbro’: the next day, bad as it was, I got home before dinner. In the moment of our separation upon the road as I travelled, & every hour since—I felt all that love, respect & attachment for you, with which length of years, close connexion & your merits, have inspired me. I often asked myself, as our Carriages distended,...
You would scarcely expect to receive a letter from me at this place: a few hours before I set out for it, I as little expected to cross the Potomac again this winter, or even to be fifteen miles from home before the first of April, as I did to make you a visit in an air Balloon in France. I am here however, with Genl Gates, at the request of the Assembly of Virginia, to fix matters with the...
I have had the pleasure to receive your affectionate letter of the 21st of December—dated on board the Nymph Frigate in the harbour of New York; & felt all that man could feel from the flattering expression of it. My last to you, if I recollect right, was dispatched from Annapolis; whither I went at the request of this State to settle a plan (to be mutually adopted by the Legislatures of both...
Your letter of the 15th of Septr last year, introductory of Mr Duchi, I had the honor to receive a few days since. However great that Gentleman’s merits are, and however much I might be inclined to serve him, candor required me to tell him, as I now do you, that there is no opening (within my view) by which he could enter, & succeed in the line of his profession, in this Country. Besides being...
I have to acknowledge & thank you for your several favors of the 9th of February—19th of March & 16th of April, with their enclosures; all of which (the last only yesterday) have been received since I had the honor to address you in February. I stand before you as a Culprit; but to repent & be forgiven are the precepts of Heaven: I do the former—do you practise the latter, & it will be...
Since my last to you, I have been favored with your letters of the 11th & 13th of May by young Mr Adams, who brought them to New York, from whence they came safely to this place by the Post: the first is in Cypher; & for the communications therein contained I thank you: My best wishes will always accompany your undertakings; but remember my dear friend it is a part of the military art to...
Having written fully to you about the first of Septr; & nothing having occurred since worth reciting, I should not have given you the trouble of receiving a letter from me at this time, were it not for the good opportunity afforded me by Captn Littlepage, & my desire not to suffer any of your letters to remain long by me unacknowledged. I have now to thank you for your favors of the 9th & 14th...
Of all the correspondencies with which I am honored, none has given me more pleasure than yours; none which I am more desireous of continuing, or more ambitious to deserve. What then my Dr Madam, must have been my mortification when, instead of receiving the letter you did me the honor to write to me on the 15th of April last year, in due time, it was not ’till sometime in the course of last...
The Letter which you did me the favor to write to me by Mr Barratt dated the 6th of Feby, together with the parcel & packages which accompanied it, came safely to hand; & for which I pray you to accept my grateful acknowledgments. The account given of your tour thro’ Prussia & other States of Germany, to Vienna & back; & of the Troops which you saw reviewed, in the pay of those Monarchs, at...