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As you are going to Albany I beg your assistance in arranging the following business for me. I am a purchaser with you and others in certain Lands on the St Laurence, the patents for which have been taken out of the Land office in the name of Alexr Macomb Esqr. Independent of the purchase of the state, there were certain locations made by Genl Schuyler and others, which were to be paid for by...
ALS (draft): New-York Historical Society I take the liberty to introduce to your acquaintance and civilities Jeremiah Platt, a gentleman of this City, who has just returned from a long exile of seven years, in which period he has in every instance approved himself a zealous and upright citizen of the republick, a warm asserter of its liberties and ever ready to contribute his full proportion...
I did not leave New York untill the 18th ultimo, it being the earliest period that we were able consistent with the wish of Governor Clinton to withdraw the troops from thence. Indeed we then left nearly one hundred men, who are since releived by a company of light infantry, of the regiment retained in Service. In addition to which there is a sub., and about twenty artillery men. I have...
I wrote you particularly on the 3d instant and enclosed you my report to Congress with the various returns. I have now finished the necessary arrangements for the winter and in a few hours I shall set out for Boston—The public interest has been my actuating principle in the cou[r]se of this business and I flatter myself will meet your approbation. I have found it necessary to direct that a few...
Agreably to my promise my dear sir, I write you from this place, and flatter myself with the hope, that although my letter contains no important intelligence, yet it may not be unpleasing to you. Your calm retreat, of mount Vernon, must be a source of ineffable delight to you. you can from thence, take a retrospective view, of the critical exigencies of the War, and see a thousand ways, by...
Letter not found: from Henry Knox, 4 April 1784. On 12 April Knox wrote to GW : “I wrote your Excellency on the 4th of this month.”
I received your favor of the 20th ultimo yesterday. I am fully persuaded of the importance of a general attendance at the meeting at Philadelphia, and I have now written to those concerned in this State, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New Hampshire, urging their attendence to the utmost of my power. If General Greene shall not be gone before I reach Newport I will endeavor to bring him along....
I had the mortification to find that you set out from this place about ten oClock of the same day I arrived here. Our horses were injured on the road, which obliged me to halt one day at Baltimore. I am uncertain how long I shall stay, but I hope to set out on my return on Wednesday—You Know the state of things here—It is to be apprehended that all the necessary business will not be Finished...
I just write a line to inform you that I am just setting out for Boston—The president who has just gone for Mount Vernon, will inform you of the State of public matters—Things are not well and will probably be worse before they are better. I beg you to have the goodness to present my respectful compliments to Mrs Washington and beleive me my dear sir to be your truly affectionate ALS , DLC:GW...
A fear of intruding upon your more important concerns has prevented my writing to you since my return. I found here your kind favor of the 2d of June, with its enclosure for General Putnam which I delivered. The measures taken by Congress respecting the western posts must defeat themselves by their own imbecillity. I cannot say but that I am well satisfied to be excluded from any...
Heaven forbid my dear Sir, that you should measure my affection for you by the frequency of my letters. I have been absent from this place, a considerable part of the summer and upon my return I learned that you had gone to the Western Waters, and would not return untill the beginning of this month. There is another reason which I confess has had its influence. I considered you as overwhelmed...
The bearer Mr Laurence is a gentleman from Denmark who has been here some time, and is largely concerned in commerce to this Continent He is extremely anxious to have the honor to see you before he leaves the Country and has requested me to introduce him to you. I am my Dear Sir With the most perfect respect and attachment your affectionate humble Servant ALS , DLC:GW . GW does not indicate in...
I have the satisfaction, my dear Sir, to acknowledge the receipt of your kind favors of the 5th of Decr and of the 5th instant for which I beg you to receive my warmest thanks. I regard these letters as fresh proofs of your unchanging friendship and kindness, which I shall ever esteem among the cheif blessings of my Life. The Indians being in a bad temper when you went to the Westward I felt...
I thank you for your kind favor of the 28th ultimo, which I received last evening with its enclosures & I sincerely hope I shall not be under the necessity of troubling you so much again. But in the present instance I am under the necessity of mentioning that Major Winthrop Sargent has repeatedly informed me, that a certificate from you would be one of the most desirable and acceptable things...
It has been my intention ever since I have been in this City which is fourteen days to have written to you, but my business has been such as to prevent this gratification. Congress have directed 700 Men to be raised for three years, to be apportioned upon the states of Connecticut New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, for the protection of the Western frontiers, to defend the Settlers on the...
I have often been on the point of acknowledging your Kind favor of the 18th of June, and have as often deferred it, from the hope of having the pleasure of visiting you at Mount Vernon, on my way to James River, at which place there is a quantity of public Stores. Having been hitherto disapointed I shall no longer trust to the chapter of accidents, but embrace the opportunity which presents...
I have received your esteemed favor of the 1st instant, covering the copy of a letter from Mr Jefferson. The Marquis de la Fayette also wrote to me concerning the affair of the eagles. The enclosed papers will fully inform you on the subject. I have not the papers of the general society, they being with General Williams, therefore I cannot speak on the subject so accurately as I could wish....
I have long intended myself the pleasure of visiting you at Mount Vernon, and although, I have not given up that hope, and shall probably gratify it in the Course of next month, yet I cannot longer delay presenting myself to the remembrance of my truly respected and beloved general, whose friendship I shall ever esteem among the most valuable circumstances of my existence. Conscious of...
I did myself the pleasure of writing to you last month, and stated generally that certain disturbances existed in Massachusetts. Since that period the legislature have been sitting, and endevoring to conciliate the minds of the disafected, and perhaps in some instances by unjust means. There are people however who hold that if a measure be right in itself, one Should not be very delicate...
The insurgents who were assembled at Worcester in Massachusetts have disbanded. The people at Boston seem to be glad at this event and say it was the effect of fear. But the fact is that the insurgents effected their object, which was to prevent the Court of Common Pleas from proceeding to business. It is probable that the seizing some of the insurgents at Middlesex occasioned a greater number...
I thank you my dear Sir for your Kind favor of the 26th ultimo, which I received on the 7th instant. On the dispersion of the insurgents at Worcester, which was dictated more by the inclemency of the weather, and the consideration of having effected their object, than by any apprehensions of coercion from Government, many people were of opinion that the disorders were at an end, and that...
I wrote you my dear Sir last week and then mentioned to you the operations against the insurgents were to commence the 19th or 20th since then I have received in confidence the enclosed orders of the governor. You will be able having this for the explanation to judge more clearly of the progress of the business. You will please to retain these papers in your hands for although, no object will...
I wrote you my dear Sir on the 21st instant and then enclosed you the General orders of Governor Bowdoin—By the post last evening I have received information from Genl Sheppard, that he took post at the Magazine of the United States at Springfield on the 18th. That the insurgents were collecting in his neighbouhood, and he expected to be attacked by them as the public Stores seemed to be their...
By an express received by me Yesterday affairs at Springfield were most critically circumstanced. At 4 oClock last Thursday afternoon Genl Sheppard and the insurgents were drawn up in battle array and Shepperd expecting to be momently attacked. Capt. Cushing an officer in the troops now raising was dispatched as an express to Hartford for asistance to Shepperd says that he was confident an...
I wrote you my dear Sir by the post of yesterday and stated the high probability of an action between Genl Shepperd, on the part of government, and the insurgents at Springfield on Thursday the 25th instant, but since then I have received no further information. This is a cruel suspense and difficult to account for, but on the principle of the expected action being avoided by some...
No distinct accounts have arrived but by the post this evening we shall expect some particulars, which I will communicate tomorrow. Thus much is certain that no action has happened. I am my dear Sir Respectfully Your humble Servt ALS , DLC:GW .
Notwithstanding my expectations of receiving particular accounts of the operations against the insurgents in Massachusetts yet I am disapointed by those people who are in some degree obliged by their official connection with me to communicate with me. The two enclosed letters will convey to you the most distinct ideas of the situation of affairs up to the 28th ultimo. I shall continue to keep...
My last to you was of the 1st instant since which I have received your favor of the 25 Jany. You will probably have received mine long before this time of the 14th ultimo which will satisfy you that I received duly your favor of the 26th December. I now enclose you (in confidence) three Copies of letters written by our friend Lincoln to Govr Bowdoin which will shew you in a more connectd State...
In my last to you of the 8th instant I enclosed you a number of General Lincolns letters to Govr Bowdoin, in order to give you a connected statement of the rebellion in Massachusetts. I have now the great satisfaction of informing you, that this ugly affair, is in a train of being speedily and effectually suppressed—pursuing my former plan, I enclose you (in confidence) 4 copies of letters...
I thank you my dear Sir for your kind favor of the 3d instant which I received yesterday. I beg leave to make an observation once for all which is, that you would not consider yourself as under obligation to answer any of my letters, (unless I should particularly request the favor) untill you should find sufficient leisure and inclination for the purpose. It would pain me exceedingly were I in...
The storm in Massachusetts is subsiding for the present. But what effects the disfranchisement of a great body of people will create is not easy to say. a numerous body of high spirited men, conceiving themselves oppressed by the government composed of their equals, will reguard the oppression more than the causes which gave birth to it—They will be probably plotting perpetually, to releive...
My last to you was on the 22d instant, in which I stated my apprehensions respecting the proposed disfranchisement in Massachusetts. I did not mean to find fault with the measure. I am persuaded circumstances have rendered it necessary, and proper. But any rigorous chastisement of the rebels, will enflame them and render it right and expedient for the government to provide for its own safety...
I wrote you on the 22d ultimo, that the affairs of Massachusetts were quietly settling down to peace and good order. But by recent advice from General Lincoln, it appears that the Insurgents who fled from Massachusetts, have received encouragement from the Inhabitants of this State bordering on the Line—and that embracing the time when the greatest part of his force were disbanded on the 23...
The disturbances by the Massachusetts insurgents on the frontiers of this State, were quieted by an action which happened, on the 28th ultimo near great Barrington in which a number of them were taken prisoners. Govr Clinton therefore on his arrival, at the borders of Massachusetts finding no business, congratulated Genl Lincoln and returned to this City. The leaders of the rebellion are...
I have attended my dear Sir to your request respecting the Chevalier D’anterroches, and the following sketch is the result. He is the son of a general officer in the french service old and infirm; His uncle is the bishop of Condon, rich, and miserly; besides which he is a relation of the Marquis de la Fayette—In the early part of his Life his father designed him for the church, and forced him...
I thank you for your kind favor of the second instant which I received by the last post. Since my last to you, the legislature of Rhode-Island who seem to be unworthy of the rank of freemen, have rejected the proposition of the convention. But this may not be conclusive—The people themselves in that State may take the matter up, of which there is some probability, and send...
I enclose you a letter from Don Diego de Gardoqui, which he transmitted to me by the post to Philadelphia after my departure, and which I received by the return post. I was happy on my return to find my daughter Lucys eye so much better, as to remove all fears of being obliged to apply the surgeons instruments to it. As you will have states sufficient to proceed to business, we hope to hear by...
Influenced by motives of delicacy I have hitherto forborne the pleasure my dear Sir of writing to you since my return from Philadelphia. I have been apprehensive that the stages of the business of the convention might leak out, and be made an ill use of, by some people. I have therefore been anxious that you should escape the possibility of imputation. But as the objects seem now to be brought...
presuming that you will not set out from Philadelphia untill Monday the 17th I write you a line to congratulate you on the termination of your arduous business & to wish you a happy sight of Mrs Washington and your family. In every event respecting the reception of the propositions of the convention you will enjoy the high satisfaction of having performed every thing that could possibly be...
By this time my dear Sir, you will have again renewed your attention to your domestic affairs, after the long absence occasioned by the convention. I flatter myself with the hope that you found Mrs Washington and your family in perfect health. Every point of view in which I have been able to place the subject induces me to believe, that the moment in which the convention assembled, and the...
The bearer the Marquis de Chappedelaine has been made known to me by my old friend Colo. Mauduit duplessi. The Marquis who is an officer in the service of his most christian Majesty thinks that he should have come to America to little purpose were he to depart without having seen your Excellency, I therefore take the liberty of introducing him to your attention. I am with the most perfect...
I thank you for your kind favor of the 15th October which was duly received. Notwithstanding the opposition and writings of the enemies of the new constitution it is now pretty apparent that it will be received by considerable majorities in New Hampshire, Massachusetts Connecticut New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. The information from Maryland is defective, but Virginia it is said will...
Some time has elapsed since my writing to you as I had nothing to offer but what you were acquainted with through the medium of the public papers. The new constitution has hitherto been as well received as could have been expected, considering the various existing opinions prejudices, and parties in the respective states. In addition to Delaware Pensylvania, and New Jersey, Connecticut has...
I thank you my dear Sir for your favor of the 10th of last month which I duly received. The constitution has labored in Massachusetts exceedingly more than was expected. The opposition has not arisen from a consideration of the merits or demerits of the thing itself as a political machine, but from a deadly principle levelled at the existence of all government whatever; The principles of...
It is with great satisfaction that I inform you that last evening the news arrived here of the adoption of the new constitution in Massachusetts on the 6th instant. The members present in the convention on the decision of the question 355—187 affirmatives, 168 negatives—majority 19. It may be asserted with great truth, that the subject was most candidly examined and debated. Many of the...
Your favor of the 11th ultimo was duly received. The publication signed Publius is attributed to the joint efforts of Mr Jay, Mr Maddison and Colo. Hamilton It is highly probable that the general conjecture on this case is well founded. I have not written to you since the untoward event of New Hampshire⟨.⟩ The conduct of the convention was so contrary to expectations of every person who...
I have to acknowledge my dear Sir the receipt of your several favors in March and yours of the 28th of april enclosing the application of Major LEnfant. I intended to have written You from Philadelphia while attending on the Cincinnati but being only three days there, and being much hurried by public business I could not obey my wishes in that respect. I have this day been putting on board the...
It is with the most sincere satisfaction that I congratulate you on the unconditiona⟨l⟩ adoption of the constitution by the Convention of this state. The particulars of this important event are contained in this days paper herein enclosed. Messrs Jay Hamilton and the rest of the federalists have derived great honor from their temperate and wise conduct during the tedious debates on this...
It is a long time my dear Sir since I have had the pleasure of addressing you, owing to my having been into Massachusetts and the province of main, during the period of the last four months. I have received your favor enclosing some foreign applications for admission into the Cincinnati—These papers are placed on the files of the society but cannot be acted on, untill the next general meeting...
I had the pleasure by the post of Yesterday to receive your favor of the 29th ultimo. I immediately sent to the store where the american cloths were advertised for sale, and to all other stores where it was probable there were any, but was exceedingly chagrined to learn there were none in Town at present. Four peices are however expected hourly, the invoice being received, and information of...