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I am this Day favoured with yours of the 11th. of Novr., and am unhappy to hear that the Flames of War have burst again in the eastern World, and that there is too much Reason to apprehend they will rage, at an early period, in the western Hemisphere. Nevertheless, if Britain is so much under the Influence of a weak passion, as to indulge it in renewing Hostilities amongst us, we shall meet...
This will be delivered by Mr Jarvis lately of Boston, but formerly of this City, Son in Law to Mr Broom, whom You probably know. I have but two of your Letters unanswered; one of the 27 th of June last, the Objects of which have I think been fully complied with, & the other of Nov r 4, in which I find no Mention of a Letter I wrote You from philadelphia in July last. Congress met in November...
I informed You a few Days since, that Yourself, M r Chancellor Levingston, & M r J Rutledge, were in Nomination for the Court of London, since which many Attempts have been made to determine the Choice, & this Morning it was effected & devolves on Yourself. I am happy to give You this Information, both on publick Consideration, & on the Score of Friendship, the former however being on every...
A few Days since, I rec d your Letter of the 13 th of Decr last, without either of the Arrets therein referred to. from the Cover of the Letter, which is inclosed for your Inspection, I suspect it has been opened, previously to my receiving it; if so, I should be well pleased to know who the person is that is so very curious as to loose his Sense of Honor in this Matter. When I left New York,...
By the last Post I received from the president of the Senate of Massachusetts a Letter, inclosing the papers herewith transmitted, & requesting me to write to your Excellency on the Subject. As I have no other Knowledge of the Matter, than what is derived from Colo. Gridley’s Letter & the Resolve accompanying it, I can only say, that when your Excellency is at Leisure, if You think it...
I am this day, Madam, favoured with your Letter of the 19th. of March, and embrace the earliest Oppertunity of informing You, that it is highly probable, Congress will make their Arrangements, for negotiating commercial Treaties this Week. The Subject has several Months been prepared, for Deliberation, but this has been prevented by the Want of a full Representation; untill of late, there...
Since my last of the 3 d of August I am favoured with yours of the 26 th of June, 6 th of July, 26 th of August & 11 th of September, & am much obliged to You for the papers inclosed in the July Letter, as well as for the useful Information contained in all of them. The Conduct of the Court of London, clearly indicates, & convinces Us on this Side the Atlantic that they have an unfriendly...
Here I am after a six Months Session at Annapolis, on my Way to Massachusetts, & altho my Opposition to the same System in America, which you have opposed in Europe, has perhaps rendered me equally obnoxious here to the aristocratic Party, yet I assure You the Pleasure resulting from a Reflection on the Measures adopted by Congress, overballances every trifling Consideration of the loss of...
Since I had the Pleasure of addressing You, nothing of Importance has occurred in the Concerns of our Friend excepting a Letter from Mr. Jay, wherein he with great Candour and good Sense has endeavoured to do Justice to Mr. Adams’ Character, and recommended him as the most suitable person to represent the united States at the Court of London; declaring at the same Time in the most positive...
I find on inquiring that you are elected Vice-president, having three or four times the number of votes of any other candidate. Maryland threw away their votes on Colo Harrison & South Carolina on Governor Rutledge, being with some other states which were not unaminous for you, apprehensive that this was a necessary step to prevent your election to the chair—in this point they were mistaken,...
Since my last, informing You of the Circumstances of your Appointment to the Court of London, Congress have elected Col o Smith of this State, Secretary to the Legation. several Candidates were presented to Congress, & my Friend & Collegue, M r King of Newbury port (whom I shall hereafter speak of, & whom I wish to introduce to your Confidence & Friendship) was of Opinion with myself, that it...
I have received your letter requesting “any explanation which may serve to throw further light on the subject” of the Baron de Steuben’s claims, & inclosing an extract of a report lately made thereon. In answer thereto, I must observe, that the distance of the period at which the Baron arrived at York Town is such, as to make it difficult if not impossible for a person to be very particular or...
I am favoured my dear sir by the last post with yours of the 9 th of september & 12 th of December, since the Date of Which some Arrangements which I communicated in my last, & which You are probably e’er this officially informed of, correspond with your Wishes— I feel the Force of your observations respecting the Salaries of our Ministers; but Congress in point of œconomy, are very different...
I have lately returned to this City after four Months Absence, & am favoured with your several Letters of the 31 st Jany 9 th of March & 13 th of April, in neither of which is any Mention of several Letters I wrote to You in Jan y Feb y & March last— You wish to be informed when “You are to be one of Us”? the Answer is easy, when You please. I have enquired of my Friend King whether any Order...
The proceedings of the Convention being this day published, I embrace the Oppertunity of tranmitting them by a Vessel which is to sail this morning for London. There were only three dissentients Governor Randolph & Colo Mason from Virginia & your friend who now addresses you, from Massachusetts. The objections you will easily conceive without their being enumerated: & they will probably be...
[ Annapolis, 19 May 1784 . Noted in SJL as received 24 May 1784, “inclosing introductory letters.” Letter and enclosures not found.]
I have but one of your Favours unanswered, which was duly delivered by M r Wingrove, a very intelligent & worthy Character. I wish it was in the, power of Congress to comply with his Wishes, but general Regulations will not admit thereof. I am discontinued agreably to the Confederation from my Seat in the Councils of America, & will You beleive it? I have commenced private Life, By an alliance...
The definitive Treaty is this Day ratified by Congress, & I have but a few Moments, by Colonel Hermer, who is charged with the Delivery thereof, to inform You that M r Dana is arrived & requested to attend Congress. I have suggested to some of my Friends the good policy of appointing him to a Seat in Congress, & to him the Advantages to be at this Time expected from the Measure; & I flatter...
M r Thaxter arrived here last Evening, by the Way of New York, with the definative Treaty, having narrowly escaped a severe storm by reaching that Port on Wednesday Evening— your Favours by him I have received with great Pleasure, as I was in Want of the Information they contain, as well as of your Sentiments on several important Subjects— Governor Reed will probably deliver You this, & my...
I intended by this Conveyance to have sent You a History of the Times, but by various Engagements I am prevented from fulfilling my Wishes—Will You be so obliging as to send by one of your Domestics, the Letter to M r Quin, & the other to the India House?—two such Enterprizes in one Year as to marry a Wife & purchase a Farm will I hope apologize a little While longer for my Delay in writing to...
I intended by the last packet to have answered your Letter of the 11th. of May, for which I am much indebted to you: but was accidentally prevented by her having sailed the Day before I expected it. I cannot account for the Detention of your Letter by Colo. Le Mair: And will give you notice, if the Commissioners’ Letter by him to Congress, has not been received. Your Reasoning, respecting...
I embrace the Oppertunity by Mr. Guild, of informing You, that Mr. Adams was well the 27th. of July, and that by a Letter to the Minister of France of the 29th, the Dutch Negotiation with the British was finished, by which one great Obstacle to the definitive Treaty is removed. Inclosed is an Extract of an official Letter from Doctor F—to Mr. Livingston Secretary of foreign affairs dated July...
By Mr. Bourne, who was here last Week, I informed You that our commercial Affairs were arranged, that Mr. Adams Mr. Franklin and Mr. Jefferson were to carry on the Negotiations, that three Years would probably be requisite to compleat the Business, and that you may embark for Europe, without Delay, as there is not a possibility of any Departure from the Measures adopted by Congress. Mr....
I returned to this place about a fortnight after You left it, and received from Mrs. Cotton your friendly Letter of the 2d of July, with an elegant travelling Box, which I value highly, as it has the Honor of being a pledge of your Friendship. Agreable to your Injunction I shall communicate what has occurred since You left Annapolis, presuming that You have not received the Journals. On the...
The packet has given her Signal this Morning for sailing & I have but an half Hour to write. You son Mr Adams delivered me your Favours of the 25 th & 28 th of April, & these were More acceptable as they were received from his Hands. I think him a promising Character, that will make a Figure in publick or private Life, & be an Honor to his Country as well as to his Connections. He has had much...
Mr. Thaxter is arrived with the Definitive Treaty and I have the pleasure of receiving a number of letters from Mr. Adams. I think it will be Indispensably necessary to continue him in Europe, and shall therefore use my best endeavours for this purpose; but can form no Idea of what will be the determenation of Congress on the Occasion, as the Representation of the present year will be very...
We have the honor of addressing this by our worthy friend, the honorable Mr. Sayre, who was formerly Sheriff of London. The active part, which at the commencement of the revolution, he took in favor of America, is, we presume, too well known to you, to require a relation: and the loss he sustained, in consequence of his opposition to the british ministry, is not less a matter of general...
A few Days since, I rec d your Letter of the 13 th of Dec r last, without either of the Arrets therein referred to. from the Cover of the Letter, which is inclosed for your Inspection, I suspect it has been opened, previously to my receiving it; if so, I should be well pleased to know who the person is that is so very curious as to loose his Sense of Honor in this Matter. When I left New York,...