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AL (fragment): Historical Society of Pennsylvania [ First part missing ] Franklyn for the Favor of his Invitation, sho’d have answer’d his Card sooner but has been kept at Westminster the whole Day, begs Leave now to say, that He will wait on the Doctor, and in the mean Time begs his Acceptance of his most respectful Compliments. The writer has not been identified, though the handwriting bears...
AL (mutilated): American Philosophical Society [I am] returning you my kind thanks for your favour in lending me the Perusal of Mr. Pringles account of the Meteor seen in England &c. some time agone, which I herewith return. I have been at some Pains in geting the account of this that appear’d here the 20th Ulto. in the Evening, but a Great Deal Appears from what has been said to be Imperfect...
AL : American Philosophical Society This letter, undated, unsigned, and in an unidentified hand, survives among Franklin’s papers. Internal evidence indicates that it was written by someone in the colonies and at about the middle of the eighteenth century. Because the problem of colonial union was being so actively discussed in 1754, it is tentatively assigned to that year. According to your...
Draft (incomplete): American Philosophical Society The author of this document, which survives among Franklin’s papers, might have been any one of several well-informed members of the anti-proprietary party who was in Philadelphia at the end of December 1755. The handwriting has not been identified. The manuscript consists of three pages, the first two of which are numbered 5 and 6, and the...
AL (incomplete): American Philosophical Society The accurate determination of longitude by a ship at sea long remained an unsolved problem. Several theoretically possible methods were advanced during the two centuries and a half after Columbus, but when put to actual test none proved both practicable and sufficiently reliable to serve the needs of mariners, especially of those embarked on long...
I am favoured with yours and have given particular Attention to the Contents, it gives me some relief, when you say you are not, nor has been prejudiced with me. Concious I am, that to my knowledge I never did any thing to merite it. If I have not been so fortunate for some time past as I had a reasonable prosspect of my endeavours has in no respect been the Less I am Subjected to good & bad...
I am favoured with yours, as Also for Mr Young which I have delivered him; he seems Satissfyed with your proposal and senceable that he will save more than he Could in Such a place as Bladensburgh from the Wages he had there, And now waits upon you himself —I have Dropt two lines to the Doctr desereing to let me know if there was any particular reason for his leaveing his Employ when I receive...
The Pall or Black Cloath that was sent down to you on a late Occation Mr Carlyle Informs me was Originally your property, but as we are yet unprovided with one in town we must request the favour of you to send it by the bearer—Our Friend and Accquantance Mr Joseph Wattson Departed this life last night about Eleven oClock of a Bloody Flux, he neglectd himself much in the begining of the...
Our Rum Petition and also one for the Inspection of herrings was forwarded to you yesterday by Post and hope it will be in time. along with each there is a little Memorandum for your peruseall, As the greatest difficulty seems to Arise in raiseing a Sum equivolent to that now raised on Rum imported I am in great hopes that will in some measure be Obviated when the Mode now proposed is duely...
I am favoured with yours and Observe the Contents I am very senceable of the dissadvantages a person must Labour under who wants experimental knowledge in any undertakeing whatever & more especially in the plan that you have to execute at present. And that James Clievland is by farr a properer person for such Bussiness, but what Induced me to think of recomending Mr Young, was you mentioning...
Im favoured with yours and Observe the Contents your Orders by the Adventure shall be pointedly and particularly taken notice of —I was this Morning a good deal Alarmed when we began to Overhaul your Herrings the first 3 or 4 Barrels we opned were in exceeding Bad Order On the top they were laid in promisscously without either form of packing or Salt and most of those they were filled up with...
In regard to your Design of importing Palantines into Virginia I beleve it would be attended with some difficulty from severall Circumstances, they are in generall much prejudiced against comeing into Virginia or Maryland as in either they are not allowed the same liberty of Concience in enjoying their own Religion, this Naturealy Inclines them more to Pensilvania, as well as the Number of...
Letter not found: from Robert Adam, 28 July 1774. The letter is described in the Parke-Bernet catalog no. 63, entry 380, 16–17 Nov. 1938: “Introducing a gentleman who wanted to establish a general post office through America, and about a dispute with Colonel Fairfax.” The dispute with George William Fairfax was undoubtedly over the sale of the bloomery. See Samuel Athawes to GW, 8 April 1774 ,...
With this you will receive three petitions to be laid before your honorable House respecting the duty on Rum, an inlargement of our Town, draining the Marsh lots &c. the other is relative to the Herring fishery which you well know, is become very considerable and therefore worthy of Attention. Perhaps it may be only necessary to say something respecting the inlargement of our Town & the other...
The bearer hereof Mr Young is a young man that came a perfet Stranger to me about three years ago enquireing for employmt as an Assistant or Clerk And from his appearance then I thought there was something promiseing in his looks or that bid fair for doing well haveing at that time no occation for any person my self I recomended him to Doctr Ross who I had heard say wanted such a person, he...
Mr. Cranch informs me that Hones will go to Town tomorrow, and that I may not miss one opportunity, have now taken my pen to thank you for yours by Tom, and also for that which I have just now received by Mr. Ayres. You seem in high Spirits at which you know I rejoice. Your minute description of the persons you have seen, are very entertaining to me. I cannot consent you should omit writing,...
Five Weeks have past and not one line have I received. I had rather give a dollar for a letter by the post, tho the consequence should be that I Eat but one meal a day for these 3 weeks to come. Every one I see is inquiring after you and when did I hear. All my intelligance is collected from the news paper and I can only reply that I saw by that, that you arrived such a day. I know your...
Alass! How many snow banks devide thee and me and my warmest wishes to see thee will not melt one of them. I have not heard one Word from thee, or our Little ones since I left home. I did not take any cold comeing down, and find my self in better Health than I was. I wish to hear the same account from you. The Time I proposed to tarry has Elapsed. I shall soon be home sick. The Roads at...
Why my good Man, thou hast the curiosity of a Girl. Who could have believed that only a slight hint would have set thy imagination a gig in such a manner. And a fine encouragement I have to unravel the Mistery as thou callest it. Nothing less truly than to be told Something to my disadvantage. What an excellent reward that will be? In what Court of justice did’st thou learn that equity? I...
Welcome, Welcome thrice welcome is Lysander to Braintree, but ten times more so would he be at Weymouth, whither you are afraid to come.—Once it was not so. May not I come and see you, at least look thro a window at you? Should you not be glad to see your Diana? I flatter myself you would. Your Brother brought your Letter, tho he did not let me see him, deliverd it the Doctor from whom...
How many months have passed away since I have either written or received a line from my Dear Caliope? What various Scenes have I passed thro? Your Diana become a Mamma—can you credit it? Indeed it is a sober truth. Bless’d with a charming Girl whose pretty Smiles already delight my Heart, who is the Dear Image of her still Dearer Pappa. You my Friend are well acquainted with all the tender...
I am much obliged to you for the care you have taken about help. I am very willing to submit to some inconveniences in order to lessen your expences, which I am sensible have run very high for these 12 months past and tho you know I have no particuliar fancy for Judah yet considering all things, and that your Mamma and you seem to think it would be best to take her, I shall not at present look...
Tomorrow being Commencment, suppose this will not fail thro want of a conveyance. I therefore set, to tell you that I was much obliged by your kind Letter. When ever I receive a Letter from you it seems to give new Springs to my nerves, and a brisker circulation to my Blood, tis a kind of pleasing pain that I feel, and I some how, or other catch the infection which you speak of, and I feel so...
I received your very obliging Letter and thank you for the early intelligence of your designed Tour. I could wish to be a fellow Traveller with you; tho I cannot personally partake, of your joyful reception, I feel no small pleasure in the anticipation of yours. I commit to your care a Letter which I would not trust to any hand less safe than yours. You will carry it Sir with my tenderest...
You was pleas’d to say that the receipt of a letter from your Diana always gave you pleasure. Whether this was designed for a complement, (a commodity I acknowledg that you very seldom deal in) or as a real truth, you best know. Yet if I was to judge of a certain persons Heart, by what upon the like occasion passess through a cabinet of my own, I should be apt to suspect it as a truth. And why...
I heard to Day that the Doctor had a Letter from Mr. Cranch, and that he was still very Ill, poor Man. I am grieved for him, and for you my dear Sister, who I know share with him in all his troubles. It seem s worse to me when I hear you are unwell now than it used to, when I could go and see you. Tis a hard thing to be weaned from any thing we Love, time nor distance has not yet had that...
I dare not express to you at 300 hundred miles distance how ardently I long for your return. I have some very miserly Wishes; and cannot consent to your spending one hour in Town till at least I have had you 12. The Idea plays about my Heart, unnerves my hand whilst I write, awakens all the tender sentiments that years have encreased and matured, and which when with me were every day...
I wrote you last Sabbeth evening in a good deal of pertubation of Spirits. I fear I did wrong in sending it you; I then promised to acquaint you with the result as soon as I knew it. Mr. Adams returnd a monday night in order to Relieve me from my apprehensions. It does not appear that there was any premediated design to raise a Tumult. An officer very drunk sallied forth, and was seen in that...
I was yesterday at Weymouth where I received your Letter, and the saffron risbands &c. I thank you and Cousin Betsy both; I expect you a thursday, but from all I can find out, I do not think the visit will be to any purpose; there seems to me to be at present a real aversion to change of state. having quited one has no inclination for an other; so things look to me. I am really sorry upon all...
The die is cast. Yesterday brought us such a Speach from the Throne as will stain with everlasting infamy the reign of G e orge the 3 determined to carry into Execution “the acts passd by the late parliment, and to Mantain the authority of the Legislature over all his dominions.” The reply of the house of commons and the house of Lords shew us the most wicked and hostile measures will be...