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Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1756 – 1757 (Philadelphia, 1757), pp. 48–9. Franklin and others were appointed on Dec. 16, 1756, to “prepare a Draught of a Message to the Governor, concerning the Report now prevailing in the City of the Governor’s having given Orders for Quartering of Soldiers upon private Houses.” It was brought in, approved, and sent to...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1756–1757 (Philadelphia, 1757), p. 41. Franklin and John Baynton were appointed on Dec. 8, 1756, to reply to Governor Denny’s message of that date on quartering the British troops momentarily expected in Philadelphia. Submitted the same morning, the reply was approved and sent to Denny at once. Since it is quoted in full in the...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1755–1756 (Philadelphia, 1756), pp. 52–3. Upon receipt of a renewed, urgent appeal from Gen. William Shirley to attend a forthcoming council in New York, Governor Morris asked the Assembly on December 2 whether it thought he should respond to the appeal, or stay in Pennsylvania to aid in the defense of the province. The next...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives, 1754–1755 (Philadelphia, 1755), p. 117. Col. Thomas Dunbar, commander of Braddock’s army after the defeat on the Monongahela, decided to withdraw his demoralized troops instead of making a new attack from Fort Cumberland, and on July 16 informed Governor Morris that he planned to bring two regiments into winter quarters at...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1754–1755 (Philadelphia, 1755), p. 73. On the morning of March 18 Governor Morris sent the Assembly a message announcing the arrival of General Braddock in Virginia and urging them to display “Vigour, Unanimity and Dispatch” in taking measures to supply men, provisions, and money for the army’s use. He listed the following...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1754–1755 (Philadelphia, 1755), p. 153. We have considered the Governor’s Message of the 16th Instant, with the Extract from Governor Lawrence’s Letter to Governor Phips, in which it is observed, “That if the excellent Laws prohibiting the Transportation of Provisions to Louisburg continue in Force for two Months longer, there...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1754–1755 (Philadelphia, 1755), pp. 81–2. Resolved , That the Sum of Fifteen Thousand Pounds be now given to the King’s Use; Five Thousand Pounds thereof to repay the Money borrowed for victualling the King’s Troops in Virginia; and that Isaac Norris, Evan Morgan, Joseph Fox, and Benjamin Franklin, Members of this House, and...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1755–1756 (Philadelphia, 1756), p. 21. While Morris and his Council were considering the governor’s message to the Assembly of November 8, Conrad Weiser arrived with Scaroyady and other Indians who came with pleas of action to defend the frontier lest the few still loyal Indians defect or become the victims of their armed and...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1750–1751 (Philadelphia, 1751), pp. 85–6. Resolved, N. C.D. That it is the Opinion of this House, that the Proprietaries Interest will be so greatly advanc’d by keeping up a firm Peace and friendly Correspondence with the Indians, that they ought to bear a proportionable Part of the Charges expended upon all such Treaties as...
Printed in Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives , 1762–1763 (Philadelphia, 1763), p. 40. Pursuant to a Resolve of the Nineteenth of last Month, that the Thanks of this House be given to Benjamin Franklin, Esq; for his many Services not only to the Province of Pennsylvania, but to America in general, during his late Agency at the Court of Great-Britain, the same were this Day...