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I think through all the most trying conflicts of my life, I have been called to pass through them separated from the personal condolence and support of my bosom friend, I have been taught to look for support and aid from superior power than man: there is a state of mind, when affliction dries up the source of tears, and almost bids the swollen heart burst. I have left one of those distressing...
This day you promis’d me to begin your Journey: but if the Weather is as disagreable with you as it is here, I could not exact the fullfillment of the Engagement. I fear you will have bad roads and unpleasant Weather. You talk of your Perplexities and say you must get out of them yourself. Do you think mine less severe, public or private? My dear and venerable Mother— Alass— I feel for her.—...
I have recieved your letter of the 13 th , my beloved friend, it is impossible to express the delight I experienced, when I read the welcome tidings it conveyed yes my Dearest friend, should you find it practicable, I will with pleasure attend—you—my whole life shall be devoted to render you happy, and I trust in time, it will be in my power to convince you, that I am far from wishing to...
I feel as if I were My worthy friend, Compel’d to write a few lines to you in this uncommon hour of distressing events that await you. Tho’ what you wished with respect to one of the deceased has happen’d—Yet Not the less affecting I am sure— Your Mind I think Must be freed from a Charge that Seem’d to dewell heavy upon you— when I last had the Satisfaction of Seeing You — at this Moment the...
I thank you for your obliging Letter of the 31 st Ultimo I do not know that I should have replied to it before the 5 th. of next Month had not my Daughter receved a late Letter from you & in which you inform her that the Letters you had recived from America had determined you to proceed to Lisbon as soon as possible but that you was diserous of takeing London in your way, I need not tell you...
This, I hope, is the last letter which you will receive from me at Quincy. The funeral rites performed, I prepare to set out on the morrow. I long to leave a place, where every scene and object wears a gloom, or looks so to me. My agitated mind wants repose. I have twice the present week met my friends and relatives, and taken leave of them in houses of mourning. I have asked, “Was all this...
I wrote you from Brussels on the 19 th: inst t: and acquainted you with the progress of my journey to that place. I left it on the 20 th: with the Diligence, and reached Valenciennes in safety at an early hour of the evening. There I was deserted by my fellow travellers whom I met on the banks of the Mease, but in the course of the day I had become tolerably acquainted with my new companions...
From an old friend the companion of your youthfull days you will allow the familliarity I use— I was so Struck with the intelligence m r Belcher left this morning that I am hardly capable of writing but the Spirit constraineth me the dispensations of providence are so visibly kind they have a voice of their own and need not be repeated— Peace to the Spirits of the departed they had their Dear...
On Friday the 21 st. inst t. departed this life, in the 89 th. year of her age, M rs. Susannah Hall, the venerable Mother of John Adams, President of the United States of America. And on Monday following her funeral was attended from the President’s house to the Meeting-House in this place, by a large & respectable assembly of the inhabitants of this and the neighbouring Towns, who came to pay...
Thus far am I on my journey. I hope to reach East Chester on thursday Evening, and one day I must pass there, and one in N york. on Monday I shall sit forward for Philadelphia, and could wish you to meet me at muckleroys to dinner on twesday, if agreable to you, of which you can inform me by post addrest to me at N york to be left at our Sons. Brisler will be home by Saturday Night or sunday...
I know you will rejoice to hear that we are so far on our journey without meeting any accident my Quincy Friends and Neighbours who accompanied us as far as Westown could tell you that they parted with us in as good Spirits, as the peculiar circumstances which preceeded our leaving home would admit. we reachd Williams’s and lodgd there. it was fortunate that mr Brisler was with his wife, for...
I am very much gratified to find by your favour of the 26 th: that your Journey from Brussels was so pleasant, and that you are so well satisfied with what you had seen.— I shall request Mess rs: Moliere to extend your credit with their correspondents at Paris. There is a Danish vessel going to Lisbon from Amsterdam in the course of three weeks or a month. I shall go to Amsterdam in a few days...
Your letter of the 21 st of April, appears to intimate a doubt of the possibility of our meeting, my last disappointment my beloved friend, has taught me to fear, and I have endeavored to acquire fortitude, in case of the worst— Heaven knows with what delight I should have accompanied you, and how rejoiced I should be to have it in my power to contribute to your happiness but if this cannot be...
Your Letters of the 21. 22. 23. and 26 of April are all before me— They have inspired me with all the Melancholly in which they were written. Our Mother and our Niece are gone to rest. The first a fruit fully ripe the last but a blossom or a bud.— I have Suffered for you as much as you have Suffered— But I could give you no Aid or Amusement or Comfort.— I pray God that these dispensations may...
I this day receiv’d your kind Letter from Springfield. I Set you down in Brookfield in my mind that day however I think you did right to go on as fast as you could the President must want both you & mr Brisler & could I think you would have any rest after you arriv’d I should feel better about you. but I do hope you will not think of Staying thro the hot months your Life is of too much...
we reachd here yesterday being thursday the 7 th day from leaving home. we had very bad Roads, the Rains having washd all the stones bare, and the ruts were very deep I was much fatigued; Brisler and Family went on to N york mrs Brisler much mended in her Health by her journey. I hope when we get over our fatigue we shall all be able to say so. Betsy does not seem the worse for it, tho I think...
Upon receiving this morning your Letter of the 21 st: of last month, I recurred to mine of the 7 th: in answer to which it was written. I was not conscious of being displeased at your reading Chesterfield’s Letters, or at your having mentioned it to me.— But in reading over my own letter again, I am not surprized at your having taken it in that light.— No, my ever dear, and valued friend, I am...
I have written you three letters since my arrival here; this is the fourth, which I mention only for the sake of knowing whether you received them in order. It is very well known that I am here and some people might think it worth while to discover what I write to others I have hitherto only one letter from you, and had not expected to have another until the last post, supposing you to have...
Your kind letter of the month of March last deserved an earlier answer. but my absence from this City must be my excuse. The Lay Preacher has not escaped the notice of any one who has a taste for fine writing and you may be assured it has afforded me great pleasure to hear my friend Dennie mentioned as one of the most charming writers of The age. Unfortunately I have mislaid The proposals you...
Mess rs: Moliere, will this day extend your credit with their correspondent at Paris, to the amount of 4000 livres more. This I presume will amply suffice for your occasions. I requested you by my last letter, to be here not later than the 25 th: of this month. There is to be a Ball on that day at the Hotel de Suéde. The Count desires me to tell you, that you will be very much wanted as a...
And is it possible that my charming friend should feel an uneasy sentiment a sentiment of fear in sitting down to write to me: to me, the friend of her Heart, who would rather suffer a thousand torments than give her a moment of pain?— I am really ashamed of myself for having by morose expressions chilled the feelings of a breast which was formed for the reception of none but warm and kind,...
most cordially welcome to me was your kind Letter of May the 4 th , yet I have not found time since my arrival to thank you for it, or even to write a Line to any Friend. my Journey was as pleasent as my thoughts upon what was past, and my anticipations of what was to come would permit it to be. we reachd East Chester on thursday noon and found mrs smith and Children well. my reflections upon...
I have just got your agreeable favours of 8–9— & 11— May, and as this is the last day upon which I can write to reach you at Paris, and I have but little time for the post, I shall be short. M r: Arnoux’s letter has given me great pleasure, and I wish you if you have time, to give him my grateful thanks for it; for his kind remembrance of the family, as well as his attentions to you. Madame de...
Although it is probable you will have quitted the Hague, e’re this can reach you, I cannot help answering your very kind letters, and flattering myself, that they will not arrive too late— I yesterday recieved yours, of the 6 th , which I cannot say gave me satisfaction, as it confirmed my fears of your not returning— I am sorry my best, and dearest friend, you should ever feel a moments...
The last Letter I have received from you is dated the 11 th: of last November. I know not whether since that time the multiplicity of your own avocations or the uncertainty where your Letters would find me have prevented you from writing to me. However it be I cannot suffer a long period to pass without writing, on my part, and I feel already culpable in some degree, when I reflect, that I...
I keep up My old Habit of rising at an early hour. if I did not I should have little command of my Time at 5 I rise from that time till 8 I have a few leisure hours. at 8 I breakfast, after which untill Eleven I attend to my Family arrangements. at that hour I dress for the Day. from 12 untill two I receive company, sometimes untill 3. we dine at that hour unless on company days, which are...
I hope before this Time M rs. Adams has arriv’d at Philadelphia and recovered from the Fatigues of her Journey; of her Health & yours I am solicitous to hear— Since M rs. Adams’s Departure I have been busily employed in adjusting your Farming Concerns, M r. Porter, who has the Care of your Homestead, appears to me from what little Experience I have had of Him, to be well disposed, diligent &...
Yesterdays Mail brought me your very Affectionate Letter of the 12 Instant which I have repeatedly read with great attention and deliberately wieghed the contents & therefore Speak in reply without any reserve, I find that you & my Daughter have the strongest Affection for each other & that Life must be a burthen to each so long as you are seperated, it is hard for Parents to part with...
Your letter of the 12 th is arrived, and I flatter myself that our difficulties are ended— Why my beloved friend did you tell me to choose, what I have always declared, requires not a moments hesitation to determine, no my Adams, I have long ardently wished you might be enabled to return, and I have repeatedly assured you, that no personal inconvenience, would prevent my accompanying you, if...
I hear by mr Smith & Cousin Louissa’s Letter to her Sister that your journey made you sick for several days I do not wonder at it. you was fatigued before you sat out & such bad roads to pass without more time to pass them in was enough to make you sick the weather has been very cool, uncommonly So here every thing but Indian corn grows finely notwithstanding. your Farms Would delight you....
I have received my kind friend’s letters of 3 d , 16 th: and 19 th: of May, and am impatiently waiting to hear from you and your father again. I am going this day on a tour to Amsterdam, where I shall make the arrangements for my immediate departure; so that I shall probably not remain here long enough to receive your reply to this Letter. There are many difficulties in the way of any...
Your Brother is appointed to Berlin, but you I presume will soon return to America; perhaps you may be upon your passage, and this Letter may not reach you, before You Sail I long to see you, but yet I am Very sensible it must be a cruel separation to your Brother— Who he can obtain for a Secretary I know not. The family is all here, and are as happy as the absence of all our Children, and the...
I arrived here last Evening and this morning received your cover, enclosing the Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury.— There are Letters here from America, as late as the 29 th: of April. M r: Murray had then sailed so that he may be looked for every day. I have not yet seen M r: Damen, and of course have made no arrangements. I shall make none immediately for my own departure. I feel a...
I had the Pleasure of receiving your Letter of 23 Ult o: with the Pamphlet last Saturday 27 th: for which please to accept my Thanks. According to your Directions I requested Russell to send the Centinel to you which he has since informed me he has done; you will see the Statement made relative to the Nomination and by this Scrap from the Chronicle the pitifull Venom of Envy in the party...
The weather was so cold yesterday that we had fires in our Rooms. I suppose you have weather of a similar kind. we have had frequent showers and yesterday a fine rain. The House have at length got through the answer to the speech, 3 weeks debating whether, they should use the term indignation, or sensibility. the answer as reported and as finally agreed to, is a very handsome one, as well as a...
I received your Letter by this days post I began to be anxious to hear from my Friends at Quincy. I cannot but say that I was astonishd at some of its contents. I could not believe that any Gentleman would have had so little delicacy or so small a sense of propriety as to have written a more vague opinion, and that of a Lady too, to be read in a publick assembly as an authority. the Man must...
Blessed are the Peace makers, says [a Good] Book, for which you and I, entertain the highest respect and reverence. I quote this benidiction to reconcile you to the appointment of your Best Ffriend, as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the French Republick. An appointment which all true Friends to their Country, and real Americans will rejoice in out of 28 Senators, there...
We yesterday received the Centinal. I thank you for the vindication which I found in it. I well knew how watchfull the Faction would be to lie in wait & catch at every Straw, misrepresenting and abusing every measure which was intended to secure us from foreign influence. the President waited a reasonable time for the answer of the House to his Speech, before he made his nominations to the...
“Our difficulties ended”!— Be it so.— But Faith is not one of the articles of which I possess a remarkable store.— I wish you may never have reason to consider as the commencement of difficulties, what you now regard as their termination. We shall have the means of conveyance to Lisbon.— Such as will perfectly well suit me; and such as you are willing to take up with.— But I do not like [to...
The present period is more interesting to this Country than any since the adoption of The Federal Constitution The House of Representatives after a three weeks debate on their answer to The Speech of The President have at length entered on Serious business. The fortifying our Ports and harbours. Finishing and equipping our Frigates Purchasing some large Merchantmen to be converted into Sloops...
As you are now in a Sphere of Life that requires the Enjoyment of Health, the Exercise of Wisdom, Patience and every other Virtue, I wish you the Possession of these equal to its Exigences and that as is the Day so may be your Strength. I feel anxious for my Friends, but peculiarly so for the State of my Country, at the same Time can chearfully leave it to the Care of Providence and those on...
Will you be kind as to see mr Frothingham and tell him that I wish him to have the Coachee cased, and put on Board the first vessel which sails for this place agreeing for the freight of it, before he puts it on Board I have a Leeding Brass Harniss at Quincy which I will write to have sent to mr Frothingham that the whole may come together. Dr Welch has in his Hands three hundred Dollors which...
I was not more fortunate in the weather on my return, than I was in going to Phila a. 3 days out 5 on the road it constantly rain’d.— before this you have seen the Speech of our New. Gov. & the answers of the Senate & House. this Election is as popular as any for some Years. the Answer from the House pass d. as reported by the Com tee. without any debate or the least alteration. the Printers...
I had a mantua makaker & a Tailor last week which keept me so fully imploy’d that I had not time to write I receiv’d your kind Letter by the Post a thursday & rejoice that you have got into such good order so soon. I do not rise quite so early as you but I should if I could get all my folks to Bed in season you do well to devote so much of the day to riding I hope the difficulty the bad roads...
I have felt every day as if I was conscience smit for neglecting to write to you. I have been some encumberd with cares and ceremonies which tho not very pleasent, the custom of the World, and the state of society have made them necessary in publick Life. the sitting of congress has added to my cares, at a season of the Year when I should very gladly have dispenced with so much company as we...
I have not written a line to you for a long time; yet scarcly an hour of the day passes in which you are not present to my mind; I fear my last Letters were captured the ship, captain scott, was taken by the French. you will think me more tardy than I have really been. by the date of this you will see where I am. it was not my intention to have come here untill the Fall of the Year. I expected...
Your’s of the 6 th Instant I received yesterday together with the Extracts from Bache’s Paper they have not yet found their way in to the Chronicle ’tho it may be expected. with respect to the Charge against the President of Insinserity in the Interval between his Address to Congress and his Nomination I can say that I took notice of the same here two Days only before the Nomination was known...
Your Friend Quincy is married, truly married and to a Nyork Lady, by the Name of Morten, without Beauty and without Money, but amply compensated by the accomplishments of her mind and the Virtues of her Heart, as I am informd, for I have not the pleasure of knowing her. Having told you this peice of News, I shall proceed and would acknowledge the date of your last Letter to me, but I...
The packet being detaind I write you a few Lines further to inform you that mr Marshal accepts his appointment, but Judge Dana declines on account of his Health The President accordingly has Nominated mr Gerry. the senate have not yet agreed to it. the N Englanders do not like this Nomination. You are so well acquainted with mr Gerry, and With his sentiments Principles conduct and services,...
I received your Letter of June 13 th. and thank you for it. the account you give me respecting my House and the Farm are very pleasing. I like your proposal of going to it and taking tea with my good Neighbours very much— I am very sorry to hear that mrs Beal is so unwell. I have feard that she would fall into a decline, for she has appeard to me, to look very unwell for many Months. she was a...