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I received at once, and with the utmost pleasure your two Letters of the 7 th: and 14 th: of this month. The tenderness and affection with which you assure me that you participate in my anxieties, sheds among them a gleam of the purest consolation The American Election is decided, and has been declared in the manner which I have mentioned to you in former Letters. All my friends here...
Monday Morning, the most agreable in the Week because it brings me Letters from you, has not failed me to day. I have yours of 23 and 25 March. The Correspondence with Plymouth amused me much— The Answer is Superiour to the Letter both in Delicacy, and keenness.— You might have told her, if Chance decides in Elections, it is no better than Descent. But she knows not what she wants. The Letter...
The proclamation of the 25 of March, which is published in the Centinal of April 1 st has excited many anxious thoughts in my Mind. What would I give for an hours conversation it would tend to alleviate my apprehensions. I feel as if I could fly in all our many seperations. I have experienced a variety of anxieties. I thought there could be nothing New to feel, but there is now such a...
I received an hour ago your Letters of the 22 d and 27th. I have been anxious enough for you since I saw the proclamation. I advised you to take for your cough Rhubarb & calomil. do not omit it, but take it immediatly. it will serve You for the complaint which usually afflicts you in the spring as well as for your cough. I will obey the summons as soon as possible but there are many...
I rec d. to day your favour of March 29 th. I write you every Post day and send my Letter to the office. If they do not come regularly to you it must be owing to the office. It would hurt me to refuse the request of my Nephew Elisha Adams: but you gave him and his Mother all the Answer in your Power. If D r Tufts has any Money of mine in his hands, I should be glad if he would Supply my Nephew...
Just after writing my last Letter I received your kind one of March 20; by which I find your departure is postponed until July. As it continues to us the opportunity of hearing frequently and regularly from each other it is an agreeable circumstance; it would be still more so, if it could secure to us the means of meeting again in Europe, which will however I apprehend be impossible. You...
I have already acknowledged the receipt of your kind favors of Sept r: 25 th: & Nov r: 8 th: which were the last I have from you, and that notorious thief of time, procrastination, has devoured a long interval since I made the promise to write you in a few days. I delight in receiving letters from you, but I have an almost inconquerable aversion to writing in my turn, nor can I account for a...
I sent last Evening to the post office in hopes that I might get a Letter of a late Date. I received my News papers to the 30 th March, but no Letter. if there is any delay on my part in executing your directions, attribute it solely to the post offices, which will not permit me to receive Letters but once a week from you. I should Suppose that if a Mail containd only one Letter, it ought to...
Your Letter of the 31. of March made me unhappy because it convinced me that you were so. I Attribute the Cause of it all however, to the dangerous illness of Cousin Polly Smith which I am very sorry to her. The Deaths and dangerous sicknesses of your near Relations and intimate friends always affect your tender and benevolent heart with very deep and affectionate Impressions. I hope she may...
Do not imagine my friend, that I am so weak as to indulge the hope of meeting you in this Country, ardently as I desire it, I am too well convinced our seperation for a time is inevitable to suffer myself to encourage such delusive ideas, and I now endeavor as much as possible to acquire that fortitude, you so much admire, and which I really find so essential— You tell me my friend that it is...
I have this day been obliged to take a serious and painful measure in the removal of the Collector of Newyork, and I wish you to give me your opinion concerning a successor— The office is important and lucrative, Walker has been named to me. What think you of him? I must and will have a good Federalist, one who will not prostitute his office, to a Foreign faction, or a domestic one,— I am &c a...
The day after I sent off my last Letter, I received that of my good friend, dated the 27 th: of last month; and at the same time, a Packet from America, containing my orders to quit my station here, and proceed upon that to which I am now destined. Since then I have been occupied in taking measures preparatory to my departure, which I shall however probably not effect before the latter part of...
I have this day rec d , in your favours of the 5. 6. and 7 th. of the month the first Acknowledgment of the Receipt of my Invitations to you to come to Philadelphia and share in the Burthens of your friend. I hope you may have commenced your Journey before this day: but knowing how many dispositions you have to make, and how difficult it will be to make them I cannot promise myself the...
If words could express the gratitude I feel for your kindness to me, & my Children, it would be worth while to delineate it upon paper, but as I am sure the attemt would be vain, I can only beg of him to reward you a thousand fold, who alone knows your particular wants, & can amply supply either body, or mind, out of his rich treasury— I sent for Cousin Charles to spend the Sabbath with me, he...
Tho I have not heard from you since I wrote you last, and have nothing new to say, unless it be a resital of my own perplexities, out of which I must get by myself. Yet a few lines will assure you that I am getting forward as fast as possible with my affairs, and prepairing to sit out on my journey. the weather has been as uncommonly cold and stormy for the week past, as it was Hot for two...
as soon as your Letter informed Us that M rs Brisler could not come without her husband I sent him off, in two hours, the day before Yesterday, i.e Monday. There has been Such a snow storm ever since that he must have had a bad Journey to N. York— Whether he will wait there for a Wind for Rhode Island or take the stage I know not but hope he will get home before you come away. This days Post...
I arrived here last night after a pleasant journey from Antwerp, where I lodged on Monday. Upon enquiry here I found no Diligence going to day, so that it has given me an opportunity of seeing a great part of the City, which I find surpasses much in point of situation the idea I had of it. The quarter of the park is delightful, and the prospect from the Ramparts is such as brings to mind some...
The Death of my Mother which took place this afternoon very suddenly, will prevent my Sitting out on my journey as I had intended on twesday. we propose to burry her on Monday. I do not think I can get away untill thursday. I shall therefore omit sending Beckey untill fryday. I would wish two places engaged in the Stage as I have an other Girl to go with her, and should like to have them under...
For I suppose you must have an explanation to keep you current with the vieux stile , now-a-days.— I have received your pleasant account from Brussels of your travels thus far. Continue to write me as often as you can, and sur tout return as speedily as possible. I have read something in Adam Smith about the wonders performed by division of labour. I know very well the effects of its...
I had no Letter from you Yesterday. As You intended to commence your Journey on the 24 th. it is not probable this Letter will meet you, till it returns to this Place. But as it is possible you might not be able to set out so soon, you may receive it at Quincy. Brisler is at Quincy before this, I hope. Charles is just gone, for N. York— I have communicated to him my Plan of sending my Coachman...
I think through all the most trying conflicts of my life, I have been called to pass through them separated from the personal condolence and support of my bosom friend, I have been taught to look for support and aid from superior power than man: there is a state of mind, when affliction dries up the source of tears, and almost bids the swollen heart burst. I have left one of those distressing...
This day you promis’d me to begin your Journey: but if the Weather is as disagreable with you as it is here, I could not exact the fullfillment of the Engagement. I fear you will have bad roads and unpleasant Weather. You talk of your Perplexities and say you must get out of them yourself. Do you think mine less severe, public or private? My dear and venerable Mother— Alass— I feel for her.—...
I have recieved your letter of the 13 th , my beloved friend, it is impossible to express the delight I experienced, when I read the welcome tidings it conveyed yes my Dearest friend, should you find it practicable, I will with pleasure attend—you—my whole life shall be devoted to render you happy, and I trust in time, it will be in my power to convince you, that I am far from wishing to...
I feel as if I were My worthy friend, Compel’d to write a few lines to you in this uncommon hour of distressing events that await you. Tho’ what you wished with respect to one of the deceased has happen’d—Yet Not the less affecting I am sure— Your Mind I think Must be freed from a Charge that Seem’d to dewell heavy upon you— when I last had the Satisfaction of Seeing You — at this Moment the...
I thank you for your obliging Letter of the 31 st Ultimo I do not know that I should have replied to it before the 5 th. of next Month had not my Daughter receved a late Letter from you & in which you inform her that the Letters you had recived from America had determined you to proceed to Lisbon as soon as possible but that you was diserous of takeing London in your way, I need not tell you...
This, I hope, is the last letter which you will receive from me at Quincy. The funeral rites performed, I prepare to set out on the morrow. I long to leave a place, where every scene and object wears a gloom, or looks so to me. My agitated mind wants repose. I have twice the present week met my friends and relatives, and taken leave of them in houses of mourning. I have asked, “Was all this...
I wrote you from Brussels on the 19 th: inst t: and acquainted you with the progress of my journey to that place. I left it on the 20 th: with the Diligence, and reached Valenciennes in safety at an early hour of the evening. There I was deserted by my fellow travellers whom I met on the banks of the Mease, but in the course of the day I had become tolerably acquainted with my new companions...
From an old friend the companion of your youthfull days you will allow the familliarity I use— I was so Struck with the intelligence m r Belcher left this morning that I am hardly capable of writing but the Spirit constraineth me the dispensations of providence are so visibly kind they have a voice of their own and need not be repeated— Peace to the Spirits of the departed they had their Dear...
On Friday the 21 st. inst t. departed this life, in the 89 th. year of her age, M rs. Susannah Hall, the venerable Mother of John Adams, President of the United States of America. And on Monday following her funeral was attended from the President’s house to the Meeting-House in this place, by a large & respectable assembly of the inhabitants of this and the neighbouring Towns, who came to pay...
Thus far am I on my journey. I hope to reach East Chester on thursday Evening, and one day I must pass there, and one in N york. on Monday I shall sit forward for Philadelphia, and could wish you to meet me at muckleroys to dinner on twesday, if agreable to you, of which you can inform me by post addrest to me at N york to be left at our Sons. Brisler will be home by Saturday Night or sunday...