Alexander Hamilton Papers
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From Alexander Hamilton to James McHenry, 19 March 1799

To James McHenry

Private

New York March 19. 1799

Dear Sir

I understand, that the Officers for Connecticut have been appointed & their names published,1 but I have seen no paper containing them. If so, be so good as to send me the list, and if there have been other appointments since the lists transmitted me, pray let them be added.

Pursuant to your very proper idea of having at the seat of Government of the Chiefs of Different Departments2—it seems to me adviseable that you should have some Agent for the Commissariate or provision-branch, to whom applications may be addressed & from whom orders may issue to the different Contractors or sub Agents.

Did those provisions of the “Act for organising &c.” which declares that the Adjutant General shall be ex Officio Depy. Inspector General3 & which allow the Inspector General a Secretary continue in the Bill when passed?4

Is there any arrangement which prevents me calling for the assistance of the Adjutant General when I deem it necessary?

Yrs. truly

A Hamilton

The Secy at War.

ALS (photostat), James McHenry Papers, Library of Congress; copy, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress.

1The Connecticut officers were appointed on February 13, 1799 (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 311–12). On February 14, 1799, a list of the Connecticut appointments appeared in the Gazette of the United States, and Philadelphia Daily Advertiser.

3See Section 14 of “An Act for the better organizing of the Troops of the United States; and for other purposes” (1 Stat. description begins The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, I (Boston, 1845). description ends 749–55 [March 3, 1799]).

4Section 26 of “An Act for the better organizing of the Troops of the United States; and for other purposes” reads: “And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to the inspector-general, in addition to his allowance as major-general, and in full compensation for extra services and expenses in the execution of his office, the sum of fifty dollars per month, and that he shall be allowed a secretary to be appointed by himself, with the pay and emoluments of a captain” (1 Stat. description begins The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, I (Boston, 1845). description ends 755).

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