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I am very much concerned, least you as well as your Brother, should think hard of me, for neglecting so long to write to you, but the multiplied Cares and engagements of Life added to indifferent health must plead my Excuse M r: Murray is to take the place of your Brother, and M r. Dandridge is to be his private Secretary, your brother will go to Lisbon, and you I hope will return to...
For I suppose you must have an explanation to keep you current with the vieux stile , now-a-days.— I have received your pleasant account from Brussels of your travels thus far. Continue to write me as often as you can, and sur tout return as speedily as possible. I have read something in Adam Smith about the wonders performed by division of labour. I know very well the effects of its...
I am very much gratified to find by your favour of the 26 th: that your Journey from Brussels was so pleasant, and that you are so well satisfied with what you had seen.— I shall request Mess rs: Moliere to extend your credit with their correspondents at Paris. There is a Danish vessel going to Lisbon from Amsterdam in the course of three weeks or a month. I shall go to Amsterdam in a few days...
Mess rs: Moliere, will this day extend your credit with their correspondent at Paris, to the amount of 4000 livres more. This I presume will amply suffice for your occasions. I requested you by my last letter, to be here not later than the 25 th: of this month. There is to be a Ball on that day at the Hotel de Suéde. The Count desires me to tell you, that you will be very much wanted as a...
I have just got your agreeable favours of 8–9— & 11— May, and as this is the last day upon which I can write to reach you at Paris, and I have but little time for the post, I shall be short. M r: Arnoux’s letter has given me great pleasure, and I wish you if you have time, to give him my grateful thanks for it; for his kind remembrance of the family, as well as his attentions to you. Madame de...
Your Brother is appointed to Berlin, but you I presume will soon return to America; perhaps you may be upon your passage, and this Letter may not reach you, before You Sail I long to see you, but yet I am Very sensible it must be a cruel separation to your Brother— Who he can obtain for a Secretary I know not. The family is all here, and are as happy as the absence of all our Children, and the...
I arrived here last Evening and this morning received your cover, enclosing the Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury.— There are Letters here from America, as late as the 29 th: of April. M r: Murray had then sailed so that he may be looked for every day. I have not yet seen M r: Damen, and of course have made no arrangements. I shall make none immediately for my own departure. I feel a...
Your Friend Quincy is married, truly married and to a Nyork Lady, by the Name of Morten, without Beauty and without Money, but amply compensated by the accomplishments of her mind and the Virtues of her Heart, as I am informd, for I have not the pleasure of knowing her. Having told you this peice of News, I shall proceed and would acknowledge the date of your last Letter to me, but I...
Tis expectation that make a Blessing sweet, says the poet. how sincerely sweet would it be to me to fold my dear Thomas to my Maternal Bosom in his own Native Land. I hope and wish, wish & hope that the Day may not be far distant.— This Day, the 14 of July I received by way of N york your kind Letter of April 7 th , more than 3 months Since it was written, from your Brother no one of a later...
I have rec d your charming narration of your Tour to Paris, both to me and your mother, and am happy to find you were so civilly treated and so well pleased. I shall never forget the kindness of my Friend Arnoux to myself or to you. I congratulate you, on your new Acquisition of a Sister. I Suppose this match grew out of a Spark that was kindled at Nantes in 1779 when your Brother was with me...
Your Letters have become Such a model of elegant composition, that I cannot but think you must discover So many dificencies in my untoutord stile, that I feel a little anxious in Exposing it to your Eye. your desire however to obtain intelligence from your Native Land, and from the Friends, and Relatives you have Left there, will induce you to pass over with a less scrutinizing Eye the...
I Embrace the opportunity by the British packet of writing you a few lines, tho I have not any thing very material to communicate to you. I have already informd your Brother and sister of the safe arrival of her Parents and sisters at George Town after a passage of 60 days. Since which, I have received Letters both from mr and Mrs Johnson both of whom with the young Ladies were well. young mr...
When I have written to your Brother I feel as if I had exhausted all the subjects which it is proper for me to write upon, but as your Hand writing allways gives me pleasure tho I see it only upon the superscription of a Letter, or in a few Promissory lines in the cover, I judge you will allways be gratified with a few words from me tho they contain no more than a Bullitin of our Health and...
To know that one Cannot freely say that Black, is Black; even tho it be “darkness visible,” or that white is white, tho the new fallen snow is not purer, is fettering ones faculties, as well as restraining ones pen. Yet in such perilious Times as the present, freely to discuss motives which lead to measures, or to Characterize the Actors “who fret and Strut their hour upon the stage” would not...
I promised my dear Thomas to write to him by the May packet. On Fryday Evening at the drawing Room the British Minister informd me that he would take charge of any Letters I might have to send. I wrote to your Brother by the April packet, since which there has been a continuation, and increase of that American Spirit which I informd him was rising into activity. I have sent to your Brother, by...
The Secretary of State has just informd me of an opportunity to write by way of Amsterdam. I embrace it to send you a few lines only. The vessel is to sail this day, and part of my morning which might have been devoted in writing, will be occupied in prepareing to receive the Youth of this city to the amount of 800 it is said who are comeing in a body, to present their address to the P...
As there is some probability that Thomas Welch will Embark before I shall return to Quincy, I write from hence; I shall esteem myself peculiarly fortunate to see you again in your Native Country, a longer residence abroad in your Situation, would be wholy incompatable both with your interest and future establishment in Life, as you will have to commence again in your profession—you may also...
Agreeable to your request and my own inclination I have sent out a person to your releif Thomas Welch has determined to accept the offer made him and embark for Hamburgh. There is some Hazard now in crossing the ocean. I have inclosed to you, your Friend Quincy’s oration deliverd upon the 4 of July. it is a very handsome performance and does honor to him. I hope it will bring him forward into...
The enclosed paper will give you an exact idea of that property belonging to of Doctor Welsh, and our Brother Charles, which it is that you would take under your care and management upon your arrival in America. When my library shall arrive from Lisbon you will consult with your mother for a place of security in which to lodge it. If it should be joined to that of my father, you will take care...
You cannot concieve Mr. Adams’s disappointment on opening your letter and finding it directed to me I was so agreeably surprized that I absolutely kissed it. Would to heaven we could have you back again. I did not think I should have felt the loss of your society so much but we really are not like the same family as for your brother I never saw him so much affected at anything in my life I...
We have received and been entertained with your letters from Dessau, Magdeburg and Brunswic.—We hope to hear from you, to day or to-morrow, at Hamburg, where upon your arrival, you must have found abundance of letters, either to, or for you. You ask for news; but you are now so much nearer the sources of all the important news, that it must rather come from you to us, than go from us to you....
We have received your letter of the 12th: to Mrs. Adams, but that which you mention as having written the day before to me, has not come to hand. Perhaps the pleasures of the feast put it out of your mind to send it as I cannot well account otherwise for its not having arrived—My principal concern is that it would inform me whether you have received all the letters I have forwarded to Mr...
I know not how it happened, but so it was that your favor of the 11th: instt: did not come to hand untill the day before yesterday—And yesterday came those of 17th: and 19th: both together—I am sorry that you cannot get sooner off, and very glad that you are likely to get so good an opportunity for conveyance. I shall send you some more letters before you go; at present I have none...
I have received your’s of the 26th. enclosing one for Mr Welsh—I now forward those Letters for America, with which I threatned you in my last—Of all the news which you believed or expected to believe, the only parts likely to be confirmed, are the capture of the Leander with Capt. Berry on board, and of the two french frigates by the Colossus—The burning of the transports in the Nile has no...
Without an extraordinary portion of incredulity, I might still dispute, the full confirmation of your news, as the whole of the Brest squadron, was not taken by Sir J. B Warren, and we are yet quite uncertain here what part of it really fell into his hands—But I had rather beleive in the official confirmation of the reports announcing the destruction of the transports at Alexandria, though it...
I write a line in answer to your’s of the 9th: and to send you the enclosed for J. Hall, though the wind here is easterly since yesterday, and you may have improved it, to sail upon your voyage. There are no Russian troops marching towards Pomerania—There is a new Edict here against secret Societies, of which I shall immediately forward a translation, though probably not in time to reach you...
If you have once more set your foot upon American ground, and are in Safety, God be praised I have sufferd great anxiety for you, knowing your intention of comeing this Winter. You may well suppose my Heart Leaped for Joy when I found that Captain Jenkins was safely arrived. I for three days, was expecting to see you, but upon writing to mr Smith for intelligence I could not get any concerning...
We received your short Letter of 19 November written just as the pilot from the mouth of the Elbe was about to leave you. Since that time untill this day we have had almost incessantly Easterly winds blowing, & we hope that you enjoyed the benefit of them, & long before this find yourself restored to the bosom of our Country & friends. Since your departure several circumstances have occurred...
I Congratulate you my dear Son, upon your safe arrival in your Native Country; and myself that I have the prospect of seeing you again, a prospect which for many Months I had no hopes of realizing. as your Father can inform you, and to the very low State of my Health, it is oweing that I cannot so soon as I wish enjoy the pleasure of welcomeing you Home; and meeting you at Philadelphia, where...
I received with sincere pleasure the confirmation of your Safe arrival in your Native Land from under your own Hand yesterday by post. Oweing to Bad Roads, the post from N York did not arrive untill twesday, tho due on Saturday. I had written to you, as you Will find by the first Mail after I heard of your arrival, and tho I should most affectionately rejoice to see you soon, I Shall not urge...
Somewhat more than a month ago I received the very welcome intelligence that the vessel on board of which you were a passenger had arrived at New-York. Some days later, a letter from Mr. Murray mentioned that he had seen your arrival announced in a Philadelphia newspaper of the 15th: of January.Soon after, I received from our ever dear and honoured mother a letter of 1. Feby: fully confirming...
The day after I wrote you last; I received yours of 17 Jany: brought by Mr. McHenry, and which in Chronological order should have come to hand first. My present object is only to say something relative to my own affairs. By letters from our mother written before your arrival, I learnt how Charles had conducted, with regard to my property....To comment upon his proceedings would be useless, but...
I enclose herewith, a letter for Messrs: Jennings & Woddrop of Charlestown, which I will thank you to forward to them & to send them at the same time Six dollars, which you will charge to me—I suppose you will easily find an opportunity, & be sure to send the dollars with the letter, for it is to repay money, which they have advanced, to comply with a request from me, & I know not otherwise...
I presume this will find you at Philadelphia, fixd in your Lodgings; and in possession of your office, where I wish you much of the Good things of the world. tho purchased by toil & trouble, they may Serve to enhance their value; above all worldly goods. I wish you Health, for destitute of that great Blessing, few others can be enjoyed. The few Hot days which we had in May, brought upon me the...
The daily Duties of my office require so much Writing that my hand and head are fatigued & exhausted before I have half done: and this must be my apology for not writing you till now. I hope you are now well settled in your Office and pursuing your studies. Practice will come in time, but the most certainly from an incessant Attendance upon the courts and taking minutes & making Reports of...
Do you know that I have twenty fears that you are sick, or why have I not heard from you for so long a time? Your last Letter was to William Shaw and that written I believe the middle of May—the begining of June You was to enter Your office, it is now the middle, and I hear not of you—I have had an ill turn. Brisler is lade up with an attack of the veratable Goute and as Rhumatism is a cousin...
I received your Letter of June 21. I cannot but feel very anxious for your Health. the Hot Season is fast approaching, and the city will soon become Sickly. the feverish habit of which you complain, and which seems to be rivited to your constitution, will expose you to the disorders incident to the Season; I have sufferd so much from the same complaint that I know full well how to sympathize...
My last letter to you upon private affairs was of April 29. Since which I have received none from you, when untill last evening, when your’s of 4. to 12. March, from Quincy, and of 11. May from Baltimore, both come to hand—In the last, you mention having written me, at full length, the week before by the way of London, but this letter I have not received Your account of the administration of...
I wrote you last week, and now repeat for your information in case that letter should fail in the conveyance, that I have concluded to keep my obligations in Holland, and not to dispose of them, as I had proposed to you in my letter of 29. April—But that you may on the 1st: of January next, draw upon the Secretary of State 2000 Dollars, on my account, and send me an order upon Messrs: Willink,...
To your long letter of March 4–12. I ought to say something more than is merely contained in mine of the 1st: instt: in answer, without waiting for your letter by the way of England, written in the beginning of May, which I have not yet received. Yesterday a couple of small packets of news-papers and cuttings dated February and March, came to hand, which I suppose you sent with your letter...
I know not how it is, but I always feel more spirits when I take my pen to write to you than to any one else; I received a friendly Letter from dr Rush, the good Gentleman endeavours to do away all the suspis he so innocently raised, and in doing it, your Father observed that it was ten to one. if he did not go to prating to the Bishop or his daughters, and excite some Idea that he had been...
I received last evening your letter of 5. May, and having written you twice within a fortnight have now not much to say.—But I cannot forbear to give you my best thanks for your care relative to my affairs both at Boston and New York, as well as your own use and employment of the authority which I gave you to draw in my behalf—I fully approve of all your proceedings. I have this day drawn upon...
I received yours of the 21 July upon my return from a Ride. Your Father Said he had a Letter for me worth a thousand pound’s I found it had been read; I complaind, but was told It was put in unseald, on purpose that it might be read. I had not any objection to its being Seen—yet you know one chuses in Such cases to be judge for themselves; I delight very much in your Letters. you have a...
I received your N. 6. dated 3. June, about three weeks ago, at this place, and should have replied to it sooner, but for a violent fever which seized me on the first of this month, and confined me for about ten days—It was only an intermittent, and paid me no more than five visits; but they were long and severe enough to leave me very weak.—I think myself now altogether recovered, and can...
I received with much pleasure your Letters of August 1st and 12th, for which accept my Thanks. I read the papers as usual, and find the Ethiope washed white by the Necromancing powers of dallas & co— but I was not a little surprizd by the information which Mr H G otis assured me, he received from a correspondent in Philadelphia, viz that our Friend Dr Rush and mr Hartley of York Town were...
I received your two Letters together of August 20th. I have every day since designd to write to you, but have not been very well. I do not know the cause yet for many years, the Month of Sep’br. has depressed my spirits more than any other. I believe it always brings with it some dregs of the old Ague and fever. I most sincerely mourn for the distressess of N York and Philadelphia; but know...
I write you a line for the Sake of inclosing to you Russels paper, which contains the most exceptionable part of Coopers address—Mr G——r had it when I wrote you last. Truxtons Letter also appears. It is true that the Heads of departments were of Truxtons opinion, accordingly Talbots commission was made out and forwarded. But the papers which throw light upon the whole were not sent at the...
My last Letter to you was from Töplitz, of the 16th: of last month, since which I have received your N: 7. June 26. and 8. July 12. the former, a few days before leaving Töplitz, and the latter since arriving here.—Your punctuality, and frequency in writing, give me the greatest pleasure, and your constant attention to my affairs deserves my continual thanks.—I presume that before this time...
I received last night your favour of the 15th, the Sentiments and expressions of which are Such as are such as cannot fail to render your Character Prosperity and Happiness more dear to me than ever. An Office must be procured, and the Price or Rent must not be an Obstacle. I had rather pay for you a high Rent than you should not have an Office in Market or Chesnut Street. Your Brothers...
Since you are desirous of a Confidence in the Breast of your Father, and he is not less anxious to possess one in yours, I will open myself to you as soon as time will permit, upon Several Subjects and without assuming to dictate or controul will give you my candid, and frank advice. Although you have had a regular Education in the Theory and Practice of the Law, under a Master as eminent as...