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after a Sleepless night I begin my journey with an anxious mind, tho not a desponding one. my dear Sister is I hope out of danger, tho So low and weak as not to be able either to stand or walk. mrs Norten whom we had all burried in our expectations is getting up again. Thus have I cause of comfort that Death has not enterd their doors Whilst in my own family I have cause to mourn the Death of...
The morning after you left this place, the Aurora was filled with five columns & an half, from T. Coxe; wherein he undertakes to detail another private conversation, which passed between him and Mr. Dennie, during his last visit to the City, & while he lodged in the same house with Dennie & myself. It is hardly necessary to observe, that this, like all other details from the Same Source, is...
I reachd this city on Sunday Evening and have waited one day to rest myself and Horses. my health is but feeble and a little over fatigue deprives me of my rest—I Shall Sit off this morning, but cannot make more than 25 or 30 miles a day. I Shall endeavour to reach Washington on Saturday if the Weather will permit. it would be an ease to the horses if Curry could come half way to Baltimore and...
In conformity to the order of Senate of The United States I do myself the honor to lay before you a copy of their proceedings in their Executive capacity, inclusive of the last Session. I have the honor to be / Sir / Your most obedient / humble Servant MHi : Adams Papers.
Ordered, that the Secretary wait upon the President of the United States, and acquaint him, that a quorum of the Senate is assembled, and that in the absence of the Vice President, they have elected the Honorable John E Howard President of the Senate pro–tempore. Attest, MHi : Adams Papers.
Many months have pass’d since I received a line from you, or from my dear mother. From my brother Thomas I have no letter of a later date than July, and from the department of State I have but one dated since last February.—Perhaps I am to impute the greater part of this seeming oblivion of my american correspondents to my own remissness during the last winter—For six months however I have...
The letter from Genl: Pinckney to Genl: Marshall apprising him of the probable result of the South Carolina election; seems to be considered here as deciding the great political contest; which has excited So much interest, throughout the Continent, for some months past. The issue is like to be different from that which the federalists have; of late allowed themselves to anticipate, and their...
Resolved, that the President of the United States, be requested to lay before Senate the instructions given to our late Envoys Extraordinary and Ministers Plenipotentiary to the French Republic. Attest, MHi : Adams Papers.
I have received your affectionate & confidential favors of the 17th: and 23d: instt: and have conferred with Mr: Ingersoll on the subject of their contents; so far as they concerned himself. He observed, that his communication with me, on the Subject of his resignation of the office he now holds under government, was intended merely to afford an opportunity for filling the vacancy, which would...
I take up my pen to mingle with you and Mrs. Adams the feelings of our Great Affliction for the Death of General Washington. A better Man and a Greater General never lived. I have lost a real And Sincere friend who would protect Me. I now look up to you Sir to protect me in my rights and from knowing you here I shall feel the Influence of your Protection. Since I had the Honour of Seeing you...
I have searched, in conformity to the request expressed in your favor of the 2d: instt: all the writers upon the law of Nature and Nations, which I have in my Office, for authorities to support & justify & explain, the Sixth article of the Convention with France. The extracts from Vallet in your letter are somewhat more explicit on the particular point in question, than his masters, Puffendorf...
I have received with much sensibility the commission by which you have been pleased to honour me with an appointment to the office of Commissioner under the act of Congress for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the government of the United States.—And while with diffidence I accept the trust, I can not forbear to express a hope that an erroneous estimate has not been made of my...
There being a probability of at least one vacancy on the Bench of the supreme Court, Mr Read of So. Carolina hath requested me to mention him as a Candidate for the office of Judge. His Lady entertains such apprehensions from a Southern climate as have induced his determination in favor of a more Northern residence. The important stations in which Mr. Read hath been placed, added to his law...
Hitherto I have never taken the Liberty to address you by Letter, during your Administration. Living, as my years require, much retired, I have Nothing to ask whi for myself which this World can give—But still I cannot be an indifferent Spectator to the Things of this World, and especially of your eminent Virtue & Services, not only in your present illustrious Station, but in every former one,...
I have your favor of the 15th: instt. and am pleased to find in it an interpretation of the 6th: Article of the Convention with France, which had escaped my reflection—Viewing it as a provision only to operate after the expiration of our treaty with G Britain, it may be both natural & proper, but as the time when it was to operate was not specified, many others, like myself have supposed it to...
When I said, that I did not disagree with Manlius, in attributing the downfall of the federal cause, to the Mission to France, my meaning was, not, that the loss of the late election, was to be viewed, as the consequence of that Mission, for I believe with you Sir, that independent of that measure, the federal Candidate would have been almost universally deserted. But I meant to assert as my...
Your favors of the 24th: and 27th: ulto: are duly received. It seems not to be understood here, whether the proceedings; in Senate; relative to the Convention, are conclusive, as to the fate of that instrument, or whether, under any pretext, the discussion can be revived upon it. I am, myself, unable to Solve the question, though I have some idea, that the rejection of the particular,...
The wise & steady Administration of our national Government, for Twelve Years past, has not only render’d us respectable in the Eyes of Nations abroad, but has been productive of incalculable Advantages at Home— If in any Instance foreign Nations have violated our Rights, they have had Conviction, that when Justice has requir’d it, We have had not only the Means, but Resolution to resent the...
I arrived here about half after Six, without any accident, but beat and bang’d enough I do not wish for the present, a severer punishment to the Jacobins & half feds who have Sent me home at this Season, than to travel the Roads in the San Culot Stile just now; the Roads were hard frozen points up, all the way. We were 4 hours making our first Stage, and then commenced a voilent Snow Storm....
I reachd this city on tuesday Evening. at Baltimore Leiut Parker came in to see me, and offerd his service to me; I had engaged a carriage of Evans to take me here with good horses and a carefull driver, for which I was to give him 80 dollars or in proportion if I could not get across the Susquahannah I offerd mr Parker a seat with me. he was very usefull to me and exerted himself very much or...
The object of my writing at this moment is to comply with a Suggestion made, through Mr: Breck, by a great number of the most respectable and influential Merchants of this place, who have taken the alarm respecting the conditional ratification of the Convention with France, and who are now extremely anxious, that another reconsideration of it on the part of the Senate should, if possible be...
I write you once more from this city. the Trenton River is impassable and has prevented my sitting out. we hope however that the Rain may clear it. I Sent Townsend of to day; I have heard Some of the democratic rejoicing such as Ringing Bells & fireing cannon; what an inconsistancy said a Lady to me to day, the Bells of Christ Church ringing peals of rejoicing for an Infidel president! The...
Having had the honour of receiving a Commission, appointing me one of the associate Justices of the Circuit Court of the District of Columbia, I beg leave to resign the Commission which I have heretofore held, by which I was appointed one of the Commissioners under the act of Congress, for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the Government of the United States; and while, with...
I have recommended to the Secretary at War, Mr Philip Church, my nephew, for the appointment of a Captain of Infantry. This young Gentleman is personally known to you; but your knowlege of him is too slight to render it useless to speak of his qualifications. To the advantages of a good education he adds a very discreet judicious mind and an excellent heart—duly animated by that laudable pride...
The very obliging manner, in which you was pleased to assure me of the appointment of my nephew Philip Church , and the actual appointment of my relation Capta [ i ] n Hamilton to a Lieutenancy in the Navy, which I just learn from the Marine Department, are circumstances from which I derive much pleasure, which I consider as conferring upon me a personal obligation, and for which I beg you to...
I shall with pleasure obey the command contained in your letter of the 17th instant and shall accordingly inform the Governor that I am ready to proceed in the execution of the measure. With perfect respect & esteem I have the honor to be Sir Yr obed servant ALS , Adams Family Papers, deposited in the Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston; ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress.
General Wilkinson, who has been some weeks in the City, in consequence of an invitation having for object the readjustment of our Western Military affairs, is about to make a journey to Bra [ i ] ntree to pay his respects to you. On such an occasion, I hope it will not be thought improper that I should address you on the subject of this officer; since what I shall say will accord with what I...
The brigade, which as Lieut. Col. commandant, I have had the honor to command, being on the point of dismissal, I take the liberty of suggesting, that the officers & soldiers are well instructed in the duties of their profession, & it would be of great public benefit, if as many of them, as might be requisite, should be taken to fill up the corps, government have concluded to retain in...
I had the honor of receiving, an hour since, your letter of the 22d instant, with the copy of one to you from Colonel Smith. I am happy to think that the question presented is on mere military principles a very simple one. The rule of promotion, by succession, does not in any service, as far as my knowlege goes, apply to a new corps, in its first organisation. Officers for such a corps, it is...
The Secretary of war respectfully takes the liberty to transmit to the President of the U. States, a statement of his recollection of the substance and incidents of the conversation which passed between them the evening preceding the resignation of his office, committed to writing immediately afterwards. He also transmits copies of sundry papers having reference to certain parts of that...
I respectfully take the Liberty to state to you my recollection of the substance and incidents of the conversation which passed between us on the evening (the 5th instt) preceding my Resignation of the Office of Secretary for the Department of War. I dined on the same day with Mr Nicklin, and was at table when informed that my Servant waited at the door to see me. He brought me a Note which...
It has been repeatedly mentioned to me that you have, on different occasions, asserted the existence of a British Faction in this Country, embracing a number of leading or influential characters of the Fœderal Party (as usually denominated) and that you have sometimes named me, at other times plainly alluded to me, as one of this description of persons: And I have likewise been assured that of...
The time which has elapsed since my letter of the first of August was delivered to you precludes the further expectation of an answer. From this silence, I will draw no inference; nor will I presume to judge of the fitness of silence on such an occasion, on the part of The Chief Magistrate of a Republic, towards a citizen, who without a stain has discharged so many important public trusts. But...
Col Toussard, who will have the honor of delivering you this letter, is desirous of being appointed Inspector of Artillery. He has reason to hope that his wish is favoured by the Secretary at War—and seems to think that the intimation of my opinion may be useful to him. On the supposition that it accords with the views of the head of the War Department, I have no hesitation to add my...
I have heard with much pleasure, that you contemplate a visit to the City designated for the permanent Seat of the Government of the U. States, in the course of the Summer, or early in autumn. It is unnecessary, I hope, for me in that event, to express the satisfaction it would give Mrs Washington & me to see Mrs Adams, yourself & Company in the shade of our Vine & Fig tree; but I shall...
Not being in the habit since my return to private life, of sending regularly to the Post Office (nine miles from hence) every Post-day, it often happens that letters addressed to me lye longer there, on that account, than they otherwise would do. I have delayed no time, unnecessarily, since I had the honor of receiving your obliging favour of the 22d Ulto, to thank you for the polite &...
I had the honour on the evening of the 11th instant to receive from the hands of the Secretary of War, your favour of the 7th announcing that you had with the advice and consent of the Senate appointed me “Lieutenant General and Commander in Chief of all the armies raised, or to be raised for the Service of the U. S.” I cannot express how greatly affected I am at this New proof of public...
With all the respect which is due to your public station, and with the regard I entertain for your private character, the following representation is presented to your consideration. If in the course of it, any expression should escape me which may appear to be incompatible with either, let the purity of my intentions; the candour of my declarations; and a due respect for my own character, be...
The letter with which you were pleased to honor me—dated the 9th instant—was received by the last Mail; and demands my particular acknowledgments. It was with sincere concern I received the account of Mrs Adams’s low state of health, and your consequent indisposition. If my fervent wishes would restore her, and you, to perfect health, this object would soon be accomplished: and in these...
The letter herewith enclosed from Mr Joel Barlow (though the old date) came to my hands only yesterday. I have conceived it to be my duty to transmit it to you without delay—and without a comment; except that it must have been written with a very good, or a very bad design: which of the two, you can judge better than I. For, from the known abilities of that Gentleman, such a letter could not...
I have been duly honoured with your favour of the 19th Ulto, mentioning the nomination of Mr Murray to be Minister Plenipotentiary to the French Republic. With the writer of the letter, which I did myself the honour to enclose in my last to you, I truly observed that I had never held any correspondence; and I only knew him in his public mission from this Country to the Barbary States, the...
The Senate of the United States request you to accept their acknowledgments for the comprehensive and interesting detail you have given, in your speech to both Houses of Congress, on the existing state of the Union. While we regret the necessity of the present meeting of the Legislature, we wish to express our entire approbation of your conduct in convening it on this momentous occasion. The...
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the President of the US. and will have the honor of waiting on him to dinner on Thursday next RC (Gary Hendershott, Little Rock, Arkansas, 1992); addressed: “The President of the US.” Not recorded in SJL .
I do myself the honor to enclose to you a Resolution of the Senate of this day. I have the honor to be, Sir, Your most obedient and very humble servant RC ( DNA : RG 59, MLR ); at foot of text: “The President of the United States”; in hand of Samuel A. Otis, signed by TJ. Not recorded in SJL . Enclosure: Senate resolution of 18 Feb. (same, in Otis’s hand; see below). The Senate on 18 Feb.,...