You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, Abigail Smith
  • Recipient

    • Adams, John
  • Period

    • Adams Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, John" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 49 sorted by editorial placement
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
mrs Smith appears so anxious and unhappy tho She Said nothing, that Seeing it, I advised her to follow you, & Sent Michial to Town hoping She would overtake You tomorrow. She appeard so rejoiced at the proposal that in half an hour, she was gone. I hope she will overtake You by tomorrow night. I Slept well last night & tho I feel very low Spirited, I Shall Strive to be content . I will follow...
I have rejoiced in the fine weather which we have had since your absence. and tho to day it threatens a Change, and debilitates me, I hope it will not prove very urksome to you. I received Your Letter written at Flags and should have rejoiced more in Your progress, if it had not have distanced you further from mrs Smith who was following you with all speed. I fear she did not overtake You...
By the post of yesterday I received your two Letters, one from Brookfeild and one from Suffeild I rejoiced in your rapid progress as the weather was so fine but I mournd for mrs Smith who I knew was following you with all speed, but I fear from your rapid movement did not overtake you untill last night, if then, by a Letter which came yesterday to her from her Sister Clarkson which I ventured...
On Sunday, Monday and Twesday we had a storm of Rain, Hail & Snow as severe as we usually get in Jan’ry or Feb’ry attended with a voilent gale of wind I could not form an Idea where you were, but thought from Your rapid movement early in the week that you might have got as far as Norwalk. My last Letter from you was dated at Suffield. I have not heard a word from Mrs. Smith since she left...
You have been So good writing at every Stage when you put up for the night, that I have been able to follow you with pretty exact calculation. I thought however that mrs Smith would overtake you at New haven I received yesterday mor’g your Letter from Lovejoys and was rejoiced to find that mrs Smith had come up with you, more so, as the unpleasent weather must have retarded you on your...
This is our Thanksgiving day, when I look Back upon the Year past, I perceive many, very many causes for thanksgiving, both of a publick and private nature. I hope my Heart is not ungratefull, tho sad; it is usually a day of festivity when the Social Family circle meet together tho Seperated the rest of the year. No Husband dignifies my Board , no Children add gladness to it, no Smiling...
I last Evening received your Letters, one of the 24th from Prince Town, and of the 25th from Philadelphia. I rejoiced to find you safe landed there, tho so far verry far distant from me. as you wrote immediatly upon your arrival I could not expect any Family documents. I hope Brisler Will inform me. I am going to send you an excellent Servant as represented to me by my Sister Peabody: Sober...
I write you a few Lines just to Say that I am better than when I wrote you last, that mr Cranch is also Slowly mending. Boylstone Adams is not worse. I expect to hear that you have a Great cold. if so I pray You be early attentive to it. I inclose you the News paper which I take. my Neighbours taking the rest, I See them all. You will find in it the Letter I mentiond to you. it contains...
I received yours of 28th of Nov’br I have not faild of writing to you once a week ever since you left me, and I believe twice, tho the Letters may not reach You, so regularly as I wish. I have kept you informd of our movements. Mr Porter and French compleated last night getting Home the whole of our Timber, Boards, and Shingles. Of the Boards there are more than 30 thousand, and near 50...
I last Evening received yours of Novbr 28th. If oceans do not rool between us, mountains have arrisen The late sevear Snow Storm has shut me in, as close as a mouse in a trap, and that so early in the Season, that no probability appears, of any comfertable travelling this winter. The Banks are so high, so hardly compacted together that they will not be removed untill Spring; I am well...
I received the Centinal last Evening and found by it that the two Houses were formed and that a committe had waited upon you; that you could not as usual attend upon the day following oweing to indisposition. You will easily Suppose that I must feel very anxious from reading this, because I know a slight indisposition would not detain you; I have a Letter from you of the 9th of December. You...
I Last Evening received yours, of the 13th, I believe I must Cheer you up a little, and I dont know how to do it more affectually than by telling you that I am better, that I rest well a nights, and that yesterday for the first time I drank Coffe at my Sister Cranchs. We had a light fall of Snow two days ago, which coverd the bare ground, and as the Banks were considerably sunk and the Roads...
I believe our Legislatures when they made the House tax were not aware of the trouble attendant upon the execution of it. to measure every House Barn out House count every Square of Glass, collect every peice of Land, and its bounds—and then apprize the whole is a Labour indeed, I have had the Gentlemen here the last week, and they have with the assistance of your Brother gone through...
on tuesday Evening I received the Mercury, and read in it, the arrival of Capt. Jenkins in the America, on Sunday. You may well suppose I felt greatly rejoiced expecting from Thomas’s Letter, that he was undoubtedly a passenger. no mention was however made of him in the paper: I expected for two days to hear of him. Then I conjectured that not knowing of my being here, was the reason of my not...
I cannot give you any account of Thomas. I have sought for him by capt Jenkins. The Barbara which saild at the same time was a better vessel, well armd. mr Smith thought it probable he would prefer her, as she was for Boston. I joind him in the same opinion, and was not a little distresst in the Storm on Saturday Evening to hear that She had been cast away on Saturday morning near Salem, but...
I received your Letter of December the 25th and am very glad to hear you are so comfortable. I should rejoice if you had fewer perplexities, that you might have more agreable Sensations; yet if we look through the year which is past, we have abundant cause for gratitude and thankfullness to Heaven both for public and private Blessings and if we have not all we wish, we have perhaps as much as...
I believe it was in some such cold weather as the present, that Solomon made the wise observation, if two lie together, they shall be warm, but how can one be warm alone? Now if he had had such a Bedfellow as Louisa, he might have found, that two might lie together, and yet be cold, for I am sure I felt half frozen last night. Ever since thursday the weather has been most severely cold, so as...
I received your Letters of Decbr 31 & Jan’ry the 1st I am sorry that it should fall to your Lot to nominate Col Smith again, and that to a lower Grade than, as a Soldier he merrits. I think however that he was placed in a difficult situation. if he had rejected the offer, those who have stiled him a Jacobin, would have attributed it to motives unfriendly to his Country. but as a Man...
Yesterday in high Stile with his Carriage and four, His Honor the Lieut. Govenour made me a visit. This is the first notice I have received of his Gaurdianship. He desired I would inform the president that he had been here, as he had promised him that he would take care of me . I told him I should certainly comply with his request; the seeing me for the first Time, since the loss of Mrs Gill,...
I received your Letter of Jan’ry 10th last Evening by mr Black when he returnd from Town, with one from William and the news papers. If I could but hear that Thomas was Safe arrived, I Should not dispute the presidene of first visit from him. I presume he would have no hesitation in detemining where it ought first to be made. Every circumstance will certainly lead him to Philadelphia, being...
I give you joy of the Safe arrival of our–dear Thomas; whom you will have cordially received before this reaches you; I Shall be happy to see him as early as will be convenient for him: but if it is thought best that he should remain a while with you; I shall acquiese, now I have reason to believe him in Safety. I hope his Health has not sufferd from his winters Voyage. I shall the more...
I Received yours of the 15th on wedensday, and participated in the Joy and pleasure you must have experienced in meeting a dear and amiable Son after a four years Seperation. How happy should I have been to have folded him at the same time to my Bosom, and felt a pleasure which the Childless can never experience, I have already written both to you, and to him, respecting his comeing to Quincy....
I have at length procured the addresses and find them better collected and arranged than I expected, tho there are many not yet published; If dr Tufts Should have occasion for some Money he desires to know if he may draw. he applied the interest to purchase principal, since the new Loan is opend there are plenty of Six per cents at market. I have purchased 80 Bushels of oats. I could not get...
Your observations in your last Letter upon your Solitude; and your reflections upon your Age and feelings, led me to a train of Reflections to which upon that period of Life to which we are both hastning, to that period when the wise man hath told us, no pleasure is to be found; That Frederick who was as great an unbeliever as Voltaire Should experience this truth in its full face I can easily...
I have received your Letters of the 24 & 28 of Jan’ry. if you continue in the use of so many learned words—you must send a dictionary explanatory of them. When you talk of your solitude I fully Comprehend that, and commisirate you in it. I hope you have not Sleepless Nights added to your other torments. I cannot reconcile myself to the Idea of Thomass setling in philadelphia. I Shall try to...
upon the 12th, our dear Thomas reachd Quincy to my no small Joy! I am as happy in his company and Society, as you have been before me, and I bless God that he has returnd to his Native Country an honest sober and virtuous citizen. I hope he will continue an honour and a comfort to his parent’s tho it is allotted them to experience different Sensations with respect to one, of whose reformation...
I cannot say that I write you from my solitude, for who can call themselves Solitary when in the Society and company of a beloved Son, who has been long absent, and who returns to his native Land, with a plentifull Supply of the flowers and fruits which he has judiciously Selected, from the various Countries into which he has traveld. he appears very happy Surrounded by the Books in the little...
I have not any Letter from you of a later date than the 9th; you was then unwell. I have one from William of the 12th. As he does not mention your being still indisposed I hope it was only occasiond by the Thaw, and the close air of the Theatre. I have myself been confined for a week but got down Stairs yesterday, and hope I have parted with some of my bad humours by the application of...
Yesterday afternoon Mr. Greenleaf returnd from Boston, and as he, as well as my others Neighbours; are particuliarly attentive and kind, in bringing Letters and papers to me as well; as of communicating all News. He came full fraught, with the appointment of Mr. Murrey minister Plenipo to France, a measure which had astonishd all the Federilist; and was a Subject of great Speculation in...
I yesterday received yours of Febry 22d there has not been any measure of the Government since you have been placed at the Head of it, which has so universally electrified the public: as the appointment of mr Murray to France, not the man, but the appointment, it came so sudden was a measure so unexpected, that the whole community were like a flock of frightned pigions; nobody had their story...