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I received yesterday your letter and package by Capt. White, and have received the account of the last resolution of the house to disband the army. I think the jacobins have now reason to exult, at out-manœuvering the federalists, as it appears they do upon every occasion. The federalists deserve every thing that will happen to them for their apathy. The next thing I expect to hear is that...
I received yours of the 11th, this morning, by Mrs. Smith, who was so good as to stop and see me, though only a few moments, as the stage could not wait. I asked them to have breakfast or spend the day. As soon as I receive your letter, informing me when you will be at Brunswick, Colonel Smith and myself will go there, and meet you, and escort you here, where I hope you will spend Sunday. We...
I send you 5 bushels of early & 7 of late potatoes, which tho it fullfils my promise does not satisfy my intention.—foreseeing that you would wish for more than I cou’d spare, I have enquired among my neighbours, but like myself they are all scantily supplied I have however directed your messenger to the best source of information on the road where I still hope he will find what are...
Receiv’d of Mrs Adams one hundred dollars in Payment for a Portrait painted by me MHi : Adams Papers.
Persuaded that your Collection of Sermons wou’d be enriched by the addition of Dr. Osgoods I have the honor to transmit you a Copy—The sterling good sense & manly Spirit of his writings as well as their classical Elegance have long since established his literary fame on a very solid basis.—will you make my respects acceptable to the President of the United States & receive the assurances of my...
Accept the thanks of a heart opprest with sorrow but greatfull for your friendly sympathising letter. To that almighty power who alone can heal the wounds he inflicts I look for consolation and fortitude May you long very long enjoy the happiness you now possess and never know affliction like mine With prayers for your happiness / I remain your sincear / Friend NNPM .
J. May’s most respectfull compliments to Mrs: Adams, and renders the enclosed, agreably to her request. Although the high honour, and happiness confered on him, by the confidence of Mrs: Adams, is infinitely above any pecuniary compensation; yet, in obedience to her request, he is obliged to submit an account; which, with deference, he hopes will be satisfactory to her. He begs to assure Mrs:...
The Letter which you so obligingly communicated, is this day published in the Commercial Gazette; and I have endeavoured to make its insertion accurate and perspicuous. The original is enclosed according to your directions. You will, I hope, pardon me for the liberty I am about to take, in requesting the honor of your commands in future, upon any similar occasion. Well knowing my duty in this...
Being informed of your intention to stop in this Town on your way to the Southward, you will give great pleasure to Mrs. Marshall and my self by accepting a bed at our house, as we can accommodate you with convenience, & perhaps more agreeably than at a public house; and depending on the honor of seeing you / I am / Madam / Your most humble Sert MHi : Adams Papers.
I have recd yours of 13 and 15th. rejoice that you are able to write, and pray you to keep me informed, of your own health & of Mr Cranch and Boylston Adams. The inclosed Letter from Mrs Johnson I Send without loss of time. MHi : Adams Papers.
Your favor of the 26th. Ulto. I have recd. it is unfortunate that your Letter of Feby. did not arrive sooner. it may be a Lesson for the Young Man, not to be too much elated with present prospects & teach him early to bear disappointments with fortitude. I am much surpriz’d, at the application for the L. O. after a conversation which I had with Mr. & Mrs. ——— I did not expect, he wou’d have...
I have the Honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Letter of the 30th. I am much gratified that the proceedings of this Brigade meets with your approbation, I hope it will be entitled to your good opinion and wishes to the end of its military Career—my assiduities and pointed attention shall not be wanting— I have daily causes of exultation, and am very frequently complimented, By The...
We are all well and only want you and cousen L here to make us very happy. Saturday twelve O clock the president delivered his speech & spoke it so distinctly that I do not believe there was a single word but what was distincly heard all over the house ‘though it was very crouded. The president has had something such an inflamation on his right cheek as he had last summer before he went to the...
‘Though I have been writing a very long letter, to my wild, random, laughter loving Walter and have made it very late, still I want to thank my aunt for her letter of Dec 20th received yesterday morning before I sleep. Logan is chosen Representative for this State by a very large majority. It so happened that the day L took his seat, a new carpet was placed on the floor of the house. The...
I received your letter of the 18 of Nov last Wednesday. The president received yours of the 22d yesterday & of the 25 this morning—They have made us quite happy to see in what excellent spirits you are and to hear of your better health. I read Barlows letter to the president at Springfield. There can be no doubts of its authenticity. Mr Thatcher of Massachusetts said that Mr. who brought from...
Saturday April 21st, I received yours of the 9th. I wrote to you the 1st. of April in answer to yours of March 20th, which before this you must have received, and shall always esteem my letters of inestimable value, so long as they purchase yours. The excellent pamphlet you sent me I thank you. The sentiment it contains—the spirit with which it is written prove to me, that the author possesses...
My little Abby—has been sick with a slow intermitting fever, occasioned by a cold—which has thrown many round us into fevers—The Dr has just been here, & says that disorders opperate strangely, many whom he thought out of danger, are seized again—Some in their heads, lungs, and several have died with repeated voilent billious cholicks—but we have not lost any one in the Town as yet—It has been...
With this I send you two more copies of the dispatches—A defence of the Alien & sedition bills Divernois letter, Giffords address to the Loyal association &c the pamphlet setting forth the pernicious effects of stage plays. The last mentioned pamphlet was sent to the president the night after he went to the theatre and another quaker sent two more the Evening after.—they are grieved to the...
I am happy to hear that you have not suffer’d from the extreme heat of the last week. I wish the warm weather may ripen the measures of Congress—What ought to have been compleated some Months since is now but just bro’t forward. after the Rect. of the first dispatches the treaty shou’d immediately have been revok’d—better late than never. if this measure is not adopted it will hang like a...
I wrote you from Worcester, which before this, I hope you have received. We lodged last night at Palmer, dined at Suffeild and arrived here this evening little after seven. We stopt a few moments at Windsor to see the Chief Justice—who says he enjoys better health at present, than he has for many years past. The Presidents old friend Mr. Trumbull was well enough to walk to the tavern and spend...
Welcome thou best of women thou best of sisters, thou kindest of Friends, the soother of ever y human woe to the city of Washington. Welcome to the best Men Welcome to a who love, honor & respects: you take their Sweet offspring to your benevolent Bosom & say to them Thus would your grandmama do if she could hold you in her arms.—I tremble I can scarcely hold my pen other s must tell you how I...
By Major Toussard, we had the pleasure to hear of your being at Scotch plains in health, and of your being escorted a few miles from thence by some of the officers. By a letter from Malcom, I heard of your arrival at N York, and of your intention to leave that city on Saturday Morn. I presume by the time, this can reach Brookfield, you will be there—I shall direct it, under cover to Mr....
I send you this morning besides the usual number of papers, one from Newburyport containeing a good letter signed W, addressed to Joel Barlow. For two or three days past we have had very excellent slaying but a great rain yesterday has destroyed it almost all—At Quincy I suspect the snow is a foot or two deep on a level. There are a great many of the members absent of congress still absent. Mr...
I received your letter of Dec 9th, with all that pleasure and satisfaction, which, the news of your better health could not but excite— I declare I wish you would have, Aunt, a wedding every night in the week, for I plainly see that it gives you better spirits and consequently better health, than all the medicine in the world. I have not seen the president so happy this some time, for as he...
I clos’d my last Letter by informing you that Mr & Mrs Gannett were returned. I went down to receive them & found them both sick he with the Gout in his Foot & She with a violent cold I had them both to nurse till the next morning for it rain’d so hard all the afternoon that they could not return home—Mrs Norton is got below to day but is very feeble, & I hop’d to have had our house not quite...
I have seldom known it to be colder at the Eastward than it is here at present. Although I have a very large fire & my desk almost into it, still my fingers ache & the ink scarcely runs from the pen. I sent you a few days since Logan’s address, attempting, like his brother traitors, to vindicate his conduct. Thus did Arnold, Munroe & Randolph and thus do all traitors. “If their purgation did...
We arrived at this place last evening about seven Oclock, where we have found most excellent accommodations. We have been highly favored with charming weather—excellent roads and good entertainment ever since we left you—find the chariot a much easier carriage than the coaches. The President thinks he never made so great a progress in his journey with so much ease to himself as the present. At...
Mrs: Smith is playing with Caroline and having wrote yesterday, says I must introduce The Bearer—Brigade Major Coxe of the 12th. Regt. to the drawing room—he visits Philadelphia on Furlough, proposing to spend a few day’s there, Should he be there on a drawing room, day, permit his admittance, and be pleased to let Mr. Shaw to be attentive to him for the sake of his gout . he is entitled to...
Mr Adams left us yesterday morning for New York. He expects his business will detain him till monday, when he will set out for Quincy. I shall miss his company very much. I have read Mr. Gerry’s communications to Congress over and over again. The directory French government, in these last dispatches, displays in the most captivating manner, the charming pictures of candor, frankness and...
So far I have written this half hour, but I have a bad head ache, & the spirit doth not moveth me to write. Although I have nothing to entertain or amuse you still as I have begun I am resolved to finish the letter. In thus doing I do but follow the example of many celebrated poets and philosophers who have written, not letters only, but volumes, on nothing. I have read in the Centinel with...
After quite an agreeable journey we arrived at this place on the 10th inst. where we have found much better accommodations than we had any reason to expect. We are at present with two old maids Miss Barnes’s, who appear to be civil and obligeing—they have furnished the President with two rooms, a parlour handsomely furnished and a convenient bed chamber. The City is very much crouded at...
Your favor of the 28th inst I this morning had the pleasure to receive and for which my best thanks are due you. With this you will receive a letter from Mr T. Adams received last evening—I think the probability is that he will be with us this Afternoon. The Chief Justice and Govenor Davie have both left this place for New port where Captain Barrey is waiting to receive them and to carry them...
O how happy should I be, were I to sit down to write you of my dear sisters better health, but alas I cannot. She fails every day & has now grown so weak that she is not able to writte out or even to come below stairs. She still keeps her usual flow of spirits, & she sits “like patience on a monument, smiling” even tho in the arms of death. How miserable should I be, my aunt, in seeing my dear...
I have a thousand things to tell you and but a few minutes to write. We arrived in this city Fryday Evening about seven O clock—the first week we had most beautiful weather & found the roads most excellent—the President said he never knew them to be so good but the snow made them as bad as they were before good. We had not been in the house but a few minutes before his Excellency the Govenor...
I am at present much occupied in closing the military scene here, I shall effect it fully on the 14th. conformable to the wishes of Government—there is every appearance of its being closed with military propriety— concluding the perusal of the enclosed would give you pleasure, I transmit it—it might perhaps not be amiss to put it in one of the Boston papers.— Mrs: Smith and Caroline are well...
I have been honoured by your Letter of the 18th—I have noticed its Contents, I consent to your wishes, and I will smother my own, if my heart cracks—My Idea of happiness rests on the ability properly exercised—to promote the happiness of others, whenever I am furnished with this ability I exercise it, and consider myself obliged by the oportunity, I have written to Mrs. Smith, & you will...
I have this moment been conversing with Richard Dexter upon the subject of becoming one of in your Family—His Object is to get some property, that he might acquire more knowledge in our Academy, & then go into the country, purchase Land for a little Farm, & by honest industry be stiled a useful member of Society, & a faithful defender of its rights, & Liberties— He sustains a good Character, &...
Your barrels & Trunk, for which you inclos’d me a Bill of Loading some days since arriv’d safe Yesterday.—I hope the business of Congress will permit you soon to leave Philaa. before the extreme hot weather comes on.—Our House of Rep. Yesterday pass’d a Resolution Unanimously , to instruct our Sen. & Rep. in Congress to propose an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, excluding...
The president received your letter of Saturday the eigth or ninth 15th or 16th of Dec, in which you discover a very great anxiety for the president’s health, arising from what you saw in the newspapers, by this mornings mail. I wanted to fly to my dear aunt, on the wings of the wind, to inform her of our perfect health and happines. If there were not such blundering postmasters as there are I...
Saturday I was made very happy by the receipt of your letter of the 25th of January. I wish I could send you Guillotina but having not been published in any of the newspapers beside the “Connecticut Courant” I dont think it will be in my power to send it you. My cold is much better but the weather changes so often here, as soon as I get little better, I renew it.— The inclosed arreté of the...
Yours of the 2d of Feb. I received this morning—The president says he cannot blame you for not writing oftner but because you write two to him to his one, but could he write as freely as you can and had he as much leisure he should write you every day. Last Evening we went to the play. Secrets worth knowing & the children in the woods constituted the entertainment. The plays were good but the...
I have received your letters of Jan 3d & 6th with all that pleasure & gratitude which so much good counsel deserved. I do love to read your letters. Before this reaches you, you must have heard of Cousen Thomas’s arrival at N York, from whence he wrote to you. He arrived in this city this afternoon, & is very well. It would do you good to see how happy it has made Uncle. I wish Aunt was here....
Your favor of the 9th. Inst. I have recd with the Bill of Loading inclos’d. I am sorry to find that Congress will not adjourn ‘till July. The warm weather must make Philaa. very unpleasant, exclusive of many other disagreables in a City the hot-bed of Jacobinism.—We have an arrival this day from Morlaix as late as the 5 May. The expedition to England it is said will not take effect. The troops...
Not a single letter have we received from you since Monday. Uncle sighs and says, I wish Aunt would write oftener and I sigh and say, Ah! if she knew half the happiness her letters gave to us, I am sure she would write every day in the week. Congress debates have been warm and interesting for two days past on Mr. Griswolds motion respecting punishing interferences in the government &c. but it...
Our papers have given you the State of the Poll for Govr. as farr as they have been rec. the Votes from the two Western Counties have turn’d the Balance much in favor of Mr. Strong the Eastern Counties are nearly devided.—the returns this week will determine the question.—I am happy to hear that our Envoys are safe. they must have had a very disagreable time after they left Lisbon. a Ship has...
I was very glad to hear by the Letter you sent me from Brookfield that you had got safely so far. the week proved so stormy & disagreable—I was affraid I should hear you were sick. This week has been in general so pleasant excepting one day very windy that I hope you are safe at East Chester this evening, & that the President is recover’d from his cold, your children well & the sweet Caroline...
Next to the pleasure of seeing you, would have been that of hearing, of your perfect restoration to health; but tho that pleasing account has not yet reached me, it is a satisfaction to know that you are much better than when I left you: & I will still hope that “He, who is the health of the countenance,” will in his infinite mercy establish yours. I feel a great deduction from my happiness,...
It was with much pleasure I yesterday receded yours of 1st instant, as it was an assurence of your better health, I hope the return of Spring will bring to you renewed health & strength, but it is needful for your friends to caution you, as you partake too much of the spirit of Martha & are apt to be too careful & encumbared about many things. The Presidents being at home, will bring more...
Your favors of the 19th & 22d I have recd. no Vessell at present is up for Phila.a. If any one offers, I will endeavour to procure the articles you wish to be sent. it is now so late in the season, that I do not expect I shall forward them— I am much oblig’d to you for the papers you inclos’d. such Mad Men, as Cooper can never do any injury to the Government. Their mad zeal, defeats their own...
your excellent Letter of the 26th of May I receiv’d a Saterday. I have heard or seen Something about this Book of Mr Robinson’s & have wish’d to read it. Tis about to be Printed in Boston. mr Kirkland tells me who preach’d here yesterday—you put it into right hands when you sent it to Doctor Belnap. this country will owe much Of their safety to the clergy. There is not to be found so much...