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I have a day or two since received your favour of 10. Feby; by which I perceive that my last Letters from London had reached you, though I know not what was the fate of several that preceded them, and none of those which I wrote from this place had come to hand. I have not however since my arrival here been altogether negligent, and I hope that before this time you have received the proofs of...
I am unable to find language to express my Gratitude and thankfullness to you—for your maternal Care of the Dear little orphan whose life we owe to your uncommon resolution and perseverance. I think if you had not taken care of it, it would have Dyed a more dreadfull death and a more melancholy death than if it been taken away with the Smallpox or yellow fever—it is said them that will give a...
It has not been from want of the most affectionate Respect that I have suffer’d your kind letter by Mr. White to remain so long unanswer’d. The sickness and death of a late worthy friend of mine, Mr. James Cook of Georgetown, and the business which has fallen into my hands in Consequence of that Event, have occupied my whole attention and must be my apology. Mr. Cook was about my Age, and was...
I can never sufficiently thank you for your Letters. & the communications you so frequently Supply me with. I am consider’d as the fountain head from whence Couth truth is to be look’d for. I have read parts of your Letter’s till I have them by heart and can preach very well without notes now. Wherever I go I am scarcly welcome without I bring my pocket full of Letters. I was last week Several...
I feel too sensibly the obligations you have laid me under by the letters you had the goodness to write on the 3d. and 4th,—They deserve a better return than it is possible for me to make; while I can only offer the effusions of a grateful heart I see too plainly that those alone wou’d not be acceptable—You require a Serious engagement on my part which I am forbidden to make by motives that...
My knowledge of your condescension and goodness emboldens me to address you at present. I have at length prepared my History of New-England for the press, in which I have mentioned your illustrious partner as one of the first and most active promoters of the declaration of Independence. I have given a Sketch of his Speech on that important occasion from Ramsay: The whole is not inserted in any...
Since the last Letter I recd from you dated April 12th poor Sukey compleated the Journey of Life and is gone to the World of Spirits through the whole of her Sickness, few have exhibited a greater Degree of Firmness, Patience & Submission to the divine Will, She has left us the consoling Hope of her enjoying a blessed Immortality—Mrs. Tufts by her long Attendance upon her seems to be much...
Though the kind remembrance I have of my Sister is imprinted upon my heart; as with a point of a diamond, and can never be erased while vital Spirits remain, yet I know not when I have written to her.—The cares and anxieties, the hopes, and the fears, that I should do too much, or not enough for my poor Betsy, I did not wish to trouble you with, or to tell you that my mind has been so agitated...
I too have taken my pen with the rising Sun. I have been so disturb’d with the Result of the allarming riot before your Door on the fast day evening that I have not had a moments queit sleep this night. I had no Idea the faction would have treid their Strength So oppenly. I suppos’d the Letters which had been thrown into your house were mear threats. but I hope they have but staid their time....
Saturday April 21st, I received yours of the 9th. I wrote to you the 1st. of April in answer to yours of March 20th, which before this you must have received, and shall always esteem my letters of inestimable value, so long as they purchase yours. The excellent pamphlet you sent me I thank you. The sentiment it contains—the spirit with which it is written prove to me, that the author possesses...
The recipt of your affectionate and friendly letter my dear Madam Claims at once my gratitude and love.—How good is that heart that feels for others woes Such is yours,—and may Heaven bless you With health and long life, and may you still Continue to fill every Station of Life that Providence shall Call you to With that dignity humanity and sensibility which has ever been your Characteristick...
Vanity of vanity! & the conseiquenc of it is vexation of Spirit—Who ever is inclin’d to live beyond their income let them enter the House where plenty hospitality & an appearence of Wealth us’d to be display’d at the moment the mask is fallen of & they will behold a Scene of distress & woe enough to tear the heart of love & Friendship I have long suspected Doctor Welsh’s affairs were...
Your ready reply my dear madam to my last forbids a delay on my part to Cherish a Correspondence that has Given reciprocal pleasure. when I See the Glow of friendship still kept alive in the bosom of the few left of my former associates, it is a powerful Stimulous to take up the pen. it is to me indeed a pleasing occupation, when this Can be done unincumbered with ceremony.—when the mind feels...
In my Letter of the 27th. of last Decr: I took the liberty thro you to recommend my friend Major John Hobby of Portland to some appointment in the stamp department of the revenue but I find that business has been annexed to an existing office. I have now to solicit for him one which probably will take place soon, I mean that of a purchasing and issuing commissary ing for the troops which are...
I have the happiness to inform my invaluable friend mrs. Adams of the safe arrival of her precious little ward The had a long passage of 12 days but the Nurse nor Children were not sick and Naby was only one day very sick. The babe did not appear fatigued with the voyage but is very much tanned which I think must conceal some of her beauty. She is very lively and is grown very fond to have me...
I yesterday receiv’d your kind Letter of the 18th my Sons and mrs Johnson to you. you cannot think my Sister how much pleasure they gave me I had one also from Nancy informing me that her Richard was broke out with the Small Pox & was like to do very well. he had about fifty Pustles & had been very Sick for two days before he broke out. mrs Cranch had inform’d me before of mr Johnsons...
We began to suffer much for want of Rain, having had hot and dry Weather, with but very little Rain from the beginning of this Month to the. 25th. when we were relieved by a plentiful Rain. It has also been rainy through this Day and We have now a fine Prospect of a plentiful Produce— You would wish to know what Progress is made in the Building. I can only tell you that I have spared no Pains...
I have received within these few days your letters of the 17th: and 29th: of March, together with the books and pamphlets mentioned in the former. The last was forwarded to me from England by Mr: King, and at the same time one from the Secretary of State of the 10th: ulto:—I had long been without letters, and they have now been pouring in by floods at once. I have written to you and elsewhere...
Yesterday morning I had the honour of writing to the President & enclosing my fast Sermon. At noon, I had the very great pleasure of voting for him as President of the Academy to which office he was re-elected unanimously; and before night I received your very obliging favour of the 24th. with the Books & the extract, for which I return you my cordial thanks. As I had not seen Robinsons work...
Your letters of the 18th. of last December, and the 4th. of March following, with the contents, came safe to my hand. I should have acknowledged the receipt of them sooner, but I have been “ Cumbered about many things ” and knowing that your Sister had informed you of their safe arrival, I have neglected to write answers. ‘Tho’ this is but a poor apology, it is the best I can make, consistent...
Your ready reply my dear Madam to my last forbids a delay on my part to cherish a correspondence that has given reciprocal pleasure. When I see the glow of friendship kept alive in the bosom of the few left of my former associates it is a powerful stimulus to take up the pen. It is to me indeed a pleasing occupation when this can be done unincumbered by ceremony. When the mind feels itself at...
Yours of May the 20th & 21d I receiv’d last Teusday, do not be impatient my Sister if I do not write twice a week always. I believe I often do—Others have a demand upon me also & grumble if I do not write frequently—you cannot think how much I do scribbile but there is not one of my correspondents that I owe so much to as to you nor one I write to so often—you are every way so thoughtful of...
your excellent Letter of the 26th of May I receiv’d a Saterday. I have heard or seen Something about this Book of Mr Robinson’s & have wish’d to read it. Tis about to be Printed in Boston. mr Kirkland tells me who preach’d here yesterday—you put it into right hands when you sent it to Doctor Belnap. this country will owe much Of their safety to the clergy. There is not to be found so much...
I should have answer’d your kind letter of 16th. ulto. before this time, but I have only this morning return’d from the General Court at Annapolis. I thank you most sincerely for the interest you take in my affairs, and for the parental advice you have given. I have already suffer’d enough by becoming surety for others, to know how to prize that advice, but it requires a kind of hardness of...
From the favorable attention you were pleased to pay to me, while relating to you the holy vision, that appeared to my friend West’s father in Chester County, relative to the awfull visitation of God to our native land, and the exalted station she is here after to hold, paramount to all Nations which have previously, or do now exist, as well as the great denunciations against the European...
I cannot suppress the inclination I feel to transmit you a Sermon which gave me infinite pleasure—probably you know that this vicinity has been more infected with the contagious spirit of Revolutionary France than almost any part of Massachusetts.—sagacious people find it easy to apply many of the characters & all agree that Nehemiah deserved well of his country.—I sincerely pray that the U S...
I have been at hard work this morning & my hands tremble so. I can scarcly hold my Pen, but if I do not write now I may be hindred as I was last post day & so not finish my letter to send till too late I was in the chaise for Boston yesterday at 6 aclock. I found my Friends well & Doctors Welsh’s Family gratified by your attention to Thomas. Mr Smith was bound for the payment of Tomas College...
I have just finished Professor Robinson’s history of a conspiracy, against all the religions & governments of the world, and have laid it aside to answer your’s of June 2d, received the 9th. I have read this book, my aunt, with attention—have seen societies formed, whose object, under the guise of promoting general good has been to abolish all religions & government. I have seen this & am...
Three more letters from you of 3. 4. and 13. April, brought to England by Mr Thornton, have just this moment come to hand, together with a pamphlet or two.—The message to Congress of 3. April together with all the documents accompanying it, have been published in London, from whence I have received them as mentioned in a former letter. They were received from Philadelphia by the Directory on...
After having so long delayed to answer your very affectionate letter I feel perfectly ashamed of making any excuse as I am consious it is not in my power to make a proper one I must therefore rely upon your known indulgence and in future be more careful—Our jouney from Hamburg was extremely unpleasant the roads were very bad and I was in constant dread of our being overset but fortunately we...
I enclose a Duplicate of a Letter which I have lately received from Mr Adams. I have not heard of an House which would agree with the discription but if I had the Course of Exchange is so much against Holland, that I should not think of doing any thing at present. Mr. Smith has informed me of the Proposal for my Son Thomas to go to Berlin to relieve Mr Thomas B. Adams. As Mr Smith has writen...
As the extract which you marked in yr Son’s letter was too long for one paper I divided it & gave one half to Benjn & the other half to John Russell, the latter part appears in the Commercial Gazette of this day, the former I hope will come out on Saturday. I have read Robisons Conspiracy with astonishment, it contains the seeds of all the mischiefs which we have been tormented with for years...
I have just closed a letter to the Prest. on the subject of my Bror. Greenleaf. I do not know whether I have not said too much, but if I had not been restrained by a sense of Propriety I should have beg’d & pleaded that he might have some appointment or other. I consider him as a man of uncommon abilities and attention to Business, & he has no means of exercising his Talents at present, having...
Your favor of the 9th. Inst. I have recd with the Bill of Loading inclos’d. I am sorry to find that Congress will not adjourn ‘till July. The warm weather must make Philaa. very unpleasant, exclusive of many other disagreables in a City the hot-bed of Jacobinism.—We have an arrival this day from Morlaix as late as the 5 May. The expedition to England it is said will not take effect. The troops...
I have at last heard from Atkinson. I had just sent a long Letter to sister when I receiv’d one from her & another from Cousin Betsy—Sister is full of anxiety about her daughter & well she may be—for by both the letters I think her in a fix’d consumtion. Her cough is better but her Fever runs high she has night Sweats & is so weak she can ride but a few miles in a day. Cousin Betsy says she...
I thank you for your condecending notice both of me and mine; the dear Partner of my life has left this Earth and gone to Heaven. I agree with you that the loss to me can never be repaired. The lenient hand of time has as yet been insufficient to assuage my Grief, or to ease that pungent sorrow (warrented by reason and Scripture) with which I am impressed: and I sorrow most of all that I shall...
I wrote to the President the 13th. Inst. by Mr. Edmd. Soper who was going to Philadelphia to seek some office in the Land or Sea Service. As there must be a large opening for officers of one Description or another I thought He might be competent to some one or another, tho’ I do not think him prudent enough to be trusted with one that would require much Responsibility respecting Money Matters—...
SINCE the date of my last I have received your favour of 8. April, with the pamphlets mentioned in it.—The communications of the American Commissioners have resounded through every part of Europe , and produced a very sensible impression in the public opinion with regard to the characters exposed in them.—An attempt at defence has been made, by a publication in the official newspaper of the...
I did not indulge the expectation that I shoud wholly escape reproach when I had the honor to write you on the 11th of last month—your condescention (not to say partiality) had placed me in a dilemma from which even your own goodness cou’d not entirely extricate me—I resolved however to merit the continuance of your esteem & therefore at once discarded all private considerations & listened to...
I have had the House full of company for a week & have not been able to steal a moments to write to you or to my dear children at Washington.— I have receiv’d yours of the 8th & 13th of June together with one from my Son to you & one for Doctor Tufts which I deliver’d immediately into his hands as he was present when I receiv’d it. He is at your House two or three times a week & always finds...
Your Favours of May the 28h. & June the 6th. came safe to Hand in the Latter 200 Dr. and a Minute of the Sums transmitted to me, which I find to agree with the Credits I have given, it gives me Satisfaction, that in all the Transactions of Business for Quincy’s Estate as well as the Management of Yours I do not recollect an Instance wherein I have faild of giving Credit for Monies received tho...
While on the circuit here, I have received the enclosed letter from my friend Mr: Stedman of Lancaster, brother in law to Mrs: Dana—Finding that the Gentleman mentioned in it, is personally known to the President & yourself, and has been likewise recommended by Judge Cranch, it is altogether needless for me to trouble you further than by laying that letter before you—Indeed I am loth to do...
Your favor of the 19th. Ins. I have received by post. T. Welsh can have his Degree at Cambridge at any time before Commencement, if you think it necessary for him to go before you return I will look out for a passage for him and fix him off.–The Answer to the Address from the Students at Cambridge was recd. & published in one or more of our papers. (It is in the Mercury 5 June.) I think it a...
If, Madam, I still retain a Place in your esteem, (and I am not conscious that I have ever forfeited it) let me Solicit your kind interposition in behalf of an Application made by Mr. Hurd in a letter to the President for the loan Office now vacant by the decease of Mr. Appleton. Shoud Mr. H. be thought properly qualified, by the President, for this Office, he wou’d endeavor to merit it by a...
From the Uncertainty whether my Son’s Departure would be necessary before Commencement he applied for his Degree provided it should be required of him to go before that time & it was granted so that he is ready whenever an Opportunity Offers. There is no Vessell here going to Hamburgh and it is uncertain when there will be one. Since my last Mr Appleton has as I expected paid the last Debt of...
I have now received your letter of 21. April—not however by the way of Bremen but from Hamburg, though I had just received another packet from the State department of the same date, from the Consul at Bremen. With your last came likewise other letters of a date as recent as 7, May. one of them from you to my brother.—For your pamphlets and newspapers likewise I have to renew my thanks. I am...
Nothing but dire necessaty has prevented my writing as often as you could wish. I do not always think it necessary to give you a list of the avocations which forbids my taking my Pen, but you know what it is to have ranting Boys to make & mend for & young men to pull about & leave upon tables chairs &c Books papers & clothes: but I have no one to feel the propriety to keeping a house...
Your barrels & Trunk, for which you inclos’d me a Bill of Loading some days since arriv’d safe Yesterday.—I hope the business of Congress will permit you soon to leave Philaa. before the extreme hot weather comes on.—Our House of Rep. Yesterday pass’d a Resolution Unanimously , to instruct our Sen. & Rep. in Congress to propose an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, excluding...
I wrote to you about the 20th. Inst. which probably you have receiv’d by this Time—I rejoice to hear that Mr. Marshall has arrived and hope for the Arrival of the other Envoys soon—Their long & patient stay at Paris under a State of Humiliation, was considerd by many as too degrading, it may however have answered some good Purposes and eased the Minds of some who perhaps would have thought,...
Your favor of the 26th. Ulto. I have recd. it is unfortunate that your Letter of Feby. did not arrive sooner. it may be a Lesson for the Young Man, not to be too much elated with present prospects & teach him early to bear disappointments with fortitude. I am much surpriz’d, at the application for the L. O. after a conversation which I had with Mr. & Mrs. ——— I did not expect, he wou’d have...