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    • Washington, George
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    • Pickering, Timothy
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    • Adams Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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The enclosure, contained in Colo. Henleys letter to me (which with the letter itself is forwarded) needs no comment. Had it come to me as a confidential communication, the transmission of it to you, might have been attended with some embarrassment; but as it is free from this, I have no hesitation in making the government acquainted with this transaction. The presumption indeed, and I hope the...
Your letter of the 12th Ulto came duly to hand, but the expectation that Congress would rise sooner than it really did, in the first place; and the supposition that Mr Craik would return home, so Soon as [it] did rise in the next, have delayed my acknowledgment of its receipt, and giving direction relative to the money paid you on my A/c by Judge Addison, until now. But learning from Doctr...
The last Mail brought me your favour of the 24th instant, covering a letter from General Kosciuszko. And presuming that the Attorney General is on his way to Virginia, I hope to receive, soon, the Packets you committed to his charge. Not knowing where Genl Kosciuszko may be, I pray your care of the enclosed to him, as it is probable his movements will be known to you. It is with extreme regret...
Since writing to you a few days ago, I have been favoured with your letters of the 26th and 30th Ulto. If you should have occasion to write to Mr Parish of Hamburg, you would oblige me, by thanking him in my behalf, for his very polite & friendly offer of sending me any thing I might have occasion for from that place. It would be more formal than necessary, to introduce Mr Bucknall’s...
Your letters of the 24th of the last, and 2d of the present Month, have been duly received; for which, & their enclosures, I thank you. I am not surprised that some Members of the Ho. of Representatives should dis-relish your Report. It contains remarks, and speaks truths which they are desirous should be unknown to the People. I wish the parts which were left out, had been retained. The...
Confidential Dear Sir, Mount Vernon 3d March 1799 The unexpectedness of the event, communicated in your letter of the 21st Ulto, did, as you may suppose, surprise me not a little. But far, very far indeed was this surprise short of what I experienced the next day, when by a very intelligent Gentmn (immediately from Philadelphia) I was informed that there had been no direct overture from the...
Your letter of the 1st instant was brought to me by the last Post. The Journals of the 1st 2d & 3d Sessions of the first Congress, I have, & no later. These are in folio—one volume of the Senate, and another of the House of Representatives. If no complete set can be had, either in folio or octavo, it would be useless to obtain a copy of what I now possess: but if they are to be continued in...
Your favor of the 25th was received by the last Post. Mr Monroe’s application is nothing more than a continuation of the old game, in a new form; and as I presume he means to play it with all the advantages that are to be derived from his auxiliaries here I will thank you for the whole of what will come before the public—now, or then, according to circumstances. I would thank you also for...
Your private & confidential letter of the 24th Ulto came duly, and safely to hand. Its contents, I confess, surprised me. But as men will view the same things in different lights, I would now , fain hope that the P——has caught the true one; and, that good will come from the Mission, which is about to depart. These are my wishes, and no one is more ardent in them; but I see nothing in the...
I thank you for the enclosure in your letter of the 1st instant, and for forwarding my letters to England, under cover to Mr King. Since the receipt of the above, General Pinckney has given me the whole of Major Mountf[l]orence’s letter to him. Surely La Fayette will not come here on such an errand, and under such circumstances as are mentioned in that letter. And yet—I believe he will, if the...