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  • Author

    • Washington, George
  • Recipient

    • Pickering, Timothy
  • Period

    • Adams Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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Private Dear Sir, Mount Vernon 9th Septr 1798. Your private letter of the first instant came duly to hand, and I beg you to be persuaded that, no apology will ever be necessary for any confidential communications you may be disposed to entrust me with. In every public transaction of my life, my aim has been to do that, which appeared to me to be most conducive to its weal. Keeping this object...
Your letters of the 20th & 27th Ulto have been duly received; and the Pamphlets, with Colo. Monroe’s View, came safe. If no direct opportunity to Alexandria should present itself soon, by which the W[or]ks of Mr Nancrede could be sent with convenience & without liability to damage, I would thank you for putting them (carefully wrapped up) into the hands of Colo. Biddle, who is the Agent...
Owing to my not sending to the Post Office in Alexandria with the regularity I used to do whilst I was in the exercise of public duties, I did not receive your favor of the 21st instt until yesterday:nor have I before, acknowledged the receipt of your letter of the 11th, which also came safe. Not expecting to have much business to transact in Philadelphia I appointed no Agent there; and if...
Your favour of the 18th Ulto came to hand in due course of the Mail, and I thank you for the information contained in it. Is it not time to learn, Officially, and unequivocally, the result of the Presidents message, and consequent (I presume) intimation to the French Government, respecting the appointment of Envoys to Treat with it? Having no Church nearer than Alexandria (nine miles distant)...
Your favour of the 5th instant came to hand in due course; and the manner in which you proposed to dispose of my letter to Mr Murray, was perfectly agreeable to me. Knowing nothing of the writer of the enclosed letter, and unwilling to be hasty in encouraging proposals of this sort, without some information of the characters who are engaged in the Work; I take the liberty of enquiring, through...
At the sametime that I acknowledge the receipt of your favour of the 20th Ulto enclosing a translation of the Spanish letter and one from Mr King, let me beg the favour of you to forward those which go under cover with this, to their respective Addresses, along with your own if you should have occasion to write soon to our public characters abroad; or by the first conveyances if you should...
The pressure of business in the last days of my administration, occasioned my dispatching the enclosed Instrument to the Commissioners of this City without the Seal of the United States (as certified); and I should not have known it wanted this evidence, had not those Gentlemen (upon my arrival here) informed me of the omission. I now forward it for the purpose of having this defect remedied;...
The information contained in your letter of the 3d instant was highly grateful to me. Such communications are not only satisfactory to me, but are really useful; for while I hold myself in readiness to obey the call of my Country, it is expedient that I should have more authentic information than News Paper inconsistencies, of the approaching, or receding storm; that I may regulate my private...
This letter will contain very little more than an acknowledgment of the receipts of your letters of the 13th & 18th of last month, which came safe to hand. The letter written by Mr Wolcott to the President of the United States, and the representation made by me to him, so soon as I received official information of the change intended, by him, in the relative Rank of the Major Generals, and of...
I have been duly favored with your letters of the 15th & 20th Instant; and received great satisfaction from the communications in both. That General Pinckney not only accepts his appointment in the army of the United States, but accompanies the acceptance with declar[at]ions so open & candid, as those made to General Hamilton, affords me sincere pleasure. It augers well of the aid that may be...