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For a few days past, every moment of my time has been so compleatly occupied in official duties, that I have had hardly a moments time to write or even to think for myself—We have not heard from or , since your last letter to the President from Philadelphia. The President has nominated all the officers for this district Mr F. Johnson of Frederick—Mr Marshall of Alexandria, brother to ex Sec of...
I have had the pleasure to receive your very kind letter of the 14th of Feb. at Baltimore, for which I pray you to receive the grateful offerings of an honest heart. I should not have neglected answering it, till this late date, had I not been uncommonly occupied in business, and had nothing to tell you, but what I wrote to Mr. Adams, whose letters I presume you have seen. Soon after you left...
I gave you the earliest information of Mr. Jeffersons election. Last night a mob of about fifty collected about the houses near to the capitol and compelled the inhabitants to illuminate them in honor to Mr. J. This passive submission of the federalists to the will of a rascally mob is in my opinion degrading in the lowest degree. I never would have submitted I would have died first. No...
Agreeable to my promise in my last, I now inclose to you Mr Jeffersons letter, which I consider to be the counterpart of the letter to Mazzei and which, you must have more philosophy, than I think you possess, to read without bitter indignation—without execrating the author, in the most unqualified terms. The whole letter is in the canting style of the vilest demagogue of our...
Yourrs of the 20th and 21st are received. I also received this morning a compleat sett of the Portfolio without any letter or direction respecting them. Presuming they were sent to be at my disposal, I shall send them by tomorrows mail, to Anapolis where I expect to get many subscribers. I some time since sent a sett to Boston and another to young Chace at Baltimore and if I had a number more,...
Your several favors are before me. The letter for———I sent by the first mail, after receiving it. I delayed sending your brothers letter, expecting that you would comply with your promise, and send me the whole series—then I should have returned them altogether. For the pamphlet of Gentz, please to receive my best thanks. I have been highly delighted and instructed by the perusal, and doubt...
The last letter I wrote you was from Frederick Town. I should have written to you more frequently, while on the road and sooner after our arrival in this city, had it not been for the concourse of people, from the time of his reaching entering, till he left a house, which has continually surrounded the; P. residen t, and which, in this warm weather, was infinitely more fatigiueing than his...
Before I left Philadelphia, I wrote you, expecting the letter would overtake you at Brookfield. The rain on monday prevented our leaving the city till Tuesday, as we had previously intended. The great rains, which they have had this way, have made the roads very bad—they are ploughed up, by the heavy loaded German waggons, exactly like the corn fields in New-England, and you might with equal...
By Major Toussard, we had the pleasure to hear of your being at Scotch plains in health, and of your being escorted a few miles from thence by some of the officers. By a letter from Malcom, I heard of your arrival at N York, and of your intention to leave that city on Saturday Morn. I presume by the time, this can reach Brookfield, you will be there—I shall direct it, under cover to Mr....
I am favored with your Lre & will reply thereto as fully as is in my power—the house I occupy—is built upon the side of an hill—the lower Story has two Cellars & a passage to the outhouses— The Kitchen Story has an excellent office, abt 21 by 20. which contains a folding bed 4 windows a Store room, a pantry, & the best Kitchen in America—in the Area is the Ice House fill’d—the Kitchen is in...
Your favors of the 19th & 22d I have recd. no Vessell at present is up for Phila.a. If any one offers, I will endeavour to procure the articles you wish to be sent. it is now so late in the season, that I do not expect I shall forward them— I am much oblig’d to you for the papers you inclos’d. such Mad Men, as Cooper can never do any injury to the Government. Their mad zeal, defeats their own...
Your favor of the 28th inst I this morning had the pleasure to receive and for which my best thanks are due you. With this you will receive a letter from Mr T. Adams received last evening—I think the probability is that he will be with us this Afternoon. The Chief Justice and Govenor Davie have both left this place for New port where Captain Barrey is waiting to receive them and to carry them...
The Secretary of State has just informed the President, that he was writeing to you and would be happy in incloseing any letters from him. The Presidents engagements, being such, as not to allow him to improve the present opportunity, desires that I would write you a few lines. We left Quincy on the 30 Sept. and arrived in this city on the 10th of Oct. By letters from my Aunt of the 6th we...
After quite an agreeable journey we arrived at this place on the 10th inst. where we have found much better accommodations than we had any reason to expect. We are at present with two old maids Miss Barnes’s, who appear to be civil and obligeing—they have furnished the President with two rooms, a parlour handsomely furnished and a convenient bed chamber. The City is very much crouded at...
We arrived at this place last evening about seven Oclock, where we have found most excellent accommodations. We have been highly favored with charming weather—excellent roads and good entertainment ever since we left you—find the chariot a much easier carriage than the coaches. The President thinks he never made so great a progress in his journey with so much ease to himself as the present. At...
I wrote you from Worcester, which before this, I hope you have received. We lodged last night at Palmer, dined at Suffeild and arrived here this evening little after seven. We stopt a few moments at Windsor to see the Chief Justice—who says he enjoys better health at present, than he has for many years past. The Presidents old friend Mr. Trumbull was well enough to walk to the tavern and spend...
I have the honor to enclose to you, by the direction of the President, a letter from General Lincoln with a certificate signed by a number of the most respectable merchants of Boston, recommending Captain Silas Dagget of Martha’s Vineyard, to be keeper of the light house, to be erected on that Island. The president desires me to add that he has seen the man—was pleased with his civility and...
I received your letter of the 14th of Feb. yesterday—I enclosed to you this morning Browns paper containing the report of the committee, to whom was referred the Report of the committee the petitions &c requesting the repeal of the Alien & Sedition bills &c. It was drawn up by Mr. Goodrich of Cont. and is a most masterly production. I think you must be pleased with it. The report was made the...
With this I send you two more copies of the dispatches—A defence of the Alien & sedition bills Divernois letter, Giffords address to the Loyal association &c the pamphlet setting forth the pernicious effects of stage plays. The last mentioned pamphlet was sent to the president the night after he went to the theatre and another quaker sent two more the Evening after.—they are grieved to the...
I have just received your letter of the 8th of Feb. and feel grieved to find you in so low spirits and so unwell, but flatter myself that the sight of your son (whom I hope has long before this happily arrived) & his excellent company will revive your spirits and restore your health. The snow has almost entirely left us and we have had some days of the past week as pleasant and warm as we have...
Yours of the 2d of Feb. I received this morning—The president says he cannot blame you for not writing oftner but because you write two to him to his one, but could he write as freely as you can and had he as much leisure he should write you every day. Last Evening we went to the play. Secrets worth knowing & the children in the woods constituted the entertainment. The plays were good but the...
There is a class of men in this country, possessing some public confidence, but entirely destitute of any moral principle, whose whole lives are spent in the prostitution of their talents to the perversion of reason—whose unceasing endeavors are to mislead the public mind—to obstruct public business and by the aid of cavil, misrepresentation and artificial odium, to deprive the government of...
Saturday I was made very happy by the receipt of your letter of the 25th of January. I wish I could send you Guillotina but having not been published in any of the newspapers beside the “Connecticut Courant” I dont think it will be in my power to send it you. My cold is much better but the weather changes so often here, as soon as I get little better, I renew it.— The inclosed arreté of the...
Mr Adams left us yesterday morning for New York. He expects his business will detain him till monday, when he will set out for Quincy. I shall miss his company very much. I have read Mr. Gerry’s communications to Congress over and over again. The directory French government, in these last dispatches, displays in the most captivating manner, the charming pictures of candor, frankness and...
I have sat down to enclose to you the dispatches of Mr. Gerry—The Secy’s report I will send you when published. It will not be relished by the Jacobins. I have lately been reading a most enchanting poem called Joan of Arc by a Mr Southey. It has some faults in respect to its diction and versification but not withstanding these blemishes, it abounds in beauties and excellencies of the highest...
I am almost dead with a horrid cold and fear that before I shall half finish this letter I shall drown it with water, from my eyes. I wish I felt well and in good spirits enough to give you an account of the presidents ball—It was brilliant indeed, and the ladies were drest and looked almost too beautiful. The president enjoyed himself much better, than he would have done, had not Cousen...
I have received your letters of Jan 3d & 6th with all that pleasure & gratitude which so much good counsel deserved. I do love to read your letters. Before this reaches you, you must have heard of Cousen Thomas’s arrival at N York, from whence he wrote to you. He arrived in this city this afternoon, & is very well. It would do you good to see how happy it has made Uncle. I wish Aunt was here....
So far I have written this half hour, but I have a bad head ache, & the spirit doth not moveth me to write. Although I have nothing to entertain or amuse you still as I have begun I am resolved to finish the letter. In thus doing I do but follow the example of many celebrated poets and philosophers who have written, not letters only, but volumes, on nothing. I have read in the Centinel with...
I have seldom known it to be colder at the Eastward than it is here at present. Although I have a very large fire & my desk almost into it, still my fingers ache & the ink scarcely runs from the pen. I sent you a few days since Logan’s address, attempting, like his brother traitors, to vindicate his conduct. Thus did Arnold, Munroe & Randolph and thus do all traitors. “If their purgation did...
I received yours of the 29 Dec. yesterday morning. By the same mail we received the accounts of the defeat of Buonaparte, which made every good man very happy. Peter says in his paper of yesterday, that he “was just thinking! of something to present to the caitiffs of French Faction for a new years gift—something to shake their gall bladders, something to sting their souls, when he heard of...