You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Peabody, Elizabeth Smith Shaw
  • Period

    • Adams Presidency

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 4

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Peabody, Elizabeth Smith Shaw" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
Results 1-27 of 27 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Charity hopeth & believeth all things, & Love covereth a multitude of faults— But in parental affection, is included all the generous Sentiments, all the tender emotions that can animate the feeling heart; & though it may be dissposed to the most favourable constructions yet it is most sinsibly alarmed by neglect, or a want of filial regard. Feign would I hope, that my dear Son, is no ways...
The Dye is cast! Jefferson is announced the President. But I hope it will not have so dissagreeable effect upon you, as upon William Smith; for it made him quite sick. Yesterday Mr Jabez Kimbal brought us the news, just as we were going to dine, & William could not eat one morsel; but he was unwilling to own that to be the cause. I confess I could scarcely swallow mine; It rubbed very...
Not one word have I heard from my Dear Sister, since I left Boston, nor have I had any intelligence from Washington excepting what we have gathered by the News Papers, & those we have read with a peculiar degree of anxiety. My mind as well as the publicks, has long been long held in painful suspense, nor do we yet know but that he , who has been the stability of Our Times, may again preside, &...
I am happy in being here with Mr. and Mrs Foster, who behave under their recent affliction, with that becoming temper of mind, as I hope will be approbated by the great searcher of hearts, & the Giver of every Good—I am more, and more convinced that happyness is not attached, to a concomitant of wealth but that “ virtue alone , is happiness below”— I was doubly dissappointed by my sister, &...
Miss Palmer has given me hopes of your coming, & Mrs Smith to our Exhibition, & says, you say, you will be so good as to carry me home with her—We have a Ball the next night after Exhibition & I suppose my Boarders will not leave me till Friday—We have a charming harmonious family, & are as still, as could be supposed where there are so many young ones—But if at this time you should see some...
To hear of your health, & safe return to Quincy, was joyful tidings to one whose bosom glows with love, gratitude, & sisterly affection—But the account you give of Mrs Norton again sinks my Spirits, & I involuntaryly breathe out, in broken accents, O spare her, spare her, gracious heaven! protract her date, & give her to see the fruit of her labours; the good seed which she has sown, spring...
As I very seldom have any copy of my Letters I have forgotten what, & where were my last informations. Frequently I think I have mentioned things, when afterwards I have found, I had not—The Intention was so forcible upon my mind, that I believed the thing performed—But I find there is a wide difference between purposing & doing —I believe you thought me very unfeeling not to notice the...
A Letter which I had a long time wished for, I at length received from my affectionate Sister. Every day I had been thinking I would write. But the round of duties that called for my unremitted exertions; left me too weary, or too inert to take up my Pen, for the company which our Boarders attract, demand polite & respectful attentions from me, by their own obliging behaviour— And I thought...
Yesterday agreeably to the Presidents recommendation, our own feelings, & the example of David, (who called all the People together, & wept again over Abner; a Prince & a great Man fallen ;) we assembled, & with down cast Eye, & solemn dirges, walked in procession from the Academy; lamenting the departure of humanity’s Friend , Columbia’s Patriot, & Father.— Mr. Peabody delivered a Sermon you...
How often do we find that having much to say, the full heart cannot impart the half. This evil I find extends to epistolary writing, for having many incidents crouding upon each other, I thought I had not time to notice them as I ought, & so have communicated nothing. But as the occurrences of my own Family, are what can only be very interesting to you, I will tell you that our numerous little...
When I have not seen, or written to a Friend for several months so many Incidents have intervened, that I often pause, & am at a loss where to begin, not knowing what will be most interesting. Several things have occured which not having time to transmit would now appear insipid, having lost the charm of novelty. For many things lose there Spirit & flavour by age. If we cull the fairest, &...
It is a long time since I have written to you—My mind has been so agitated that I was not fit to write—or in other words, when I sat for a moment, & attempted to write my paper became so blotted, that I was asshamed to send it—Now do not attempt to reason; for I should feel so conscious that it’s dictates ought to be obeyed, & so little able to comply, that this would prove another source of...
I have received two letters from you, & suppose you wonder that you have not heard from me much oftener. We have eight Children in the house all under 14 years age—They are as good as any; but they keep me fully employed; they play hard, & tear their Cloaths so that it is almost impossible to keep them whole.—If it was not the belief , that I am promoting the cause of Literature, instilling...
My little Abby—has been sick with a slow intermitting fever, occasioned by a cold—which has thrown many round us into fevers—The Dr has just been here, & says that disorders opperate strangely, many whom he thought out of danger, are seized again—Some in their heads, lungs, and several have died with repeated voilent billious cholicks—but we have not lost any one in the Town as yet—It has been...
After many expecting, anxious hours for my dear Nephew, I am made happy by seeing his safe arrival announced in the Newspaper—The fibres of my heart cannot remain untouched, while my Sisters must be filled with joy, & gratitude— I claim a share, & feel that I am a maternal Participant—I know that you long to clasp your Son in your fond arms—When he reaches Peace-field you will think the order...
Untill you become a Parent, under similar circumstances with myself, it will be dificult for you to conceive what were the emotions of my heart, upon your leaving me at Quincy, to accompany the President to his destined seat in Philadelphia—May heaven preserve, & bless you both, was the silent incense of my Soul. You are now my Son, just embarked upon the wide Ocean of Life; your passage...
I congratulate you upon the prospect of the recovery of your dearest Friend, the Partner of your youth, the comforter of maturer years, & the solace of your declining life—I did indeed think my good Brother upon the threshold of a better world—I thought it scarcely probable that the best means would be blest; the solicitude of Friends, or even your tender Care could have kept him from the Sky,...
I have this moment been conversing with Richard Dexter upon the subject of becoming one of in your Family—His Object is to get some property, that he might acquire more knowledge in our Academy, & then go into the country, purchase Land for a little Farm, & by honest industry be stiled a useful member of Society, & a faithful defender of its rights, & Liberties— He sustains a good Character, &...
I will not sink, & dispair because many are my disappointments, & afflictions—for our Saviour has assured us that those were not the greatest of Sinners, upon whom the walls of Siloam fell—But I am sometimes ready to believe (what is almost a paradox,) that the less sensible, are the most happy, and that we must be too wise, or too stupid to be moved at the vicissitudes, and accidents which...
Whenever I have set myself down to write to my dear Sisters, I have found myself so drowned in Grief, as to prevent my proceeding any further, than to make the attempt—.To see my Child laid in the dust, was an affliction I had not prepared myself for; & I find the realities, the solemnities, the trial greater than I can bear, or support as I ought—I had too fondly hoped for her assistance now,...
Though the kind remembrance I have of my Sister is imprinted upon my heart; as with a point of a diamond, and can never be erased while vital Spirits remain, yet I know not when I have written to her.—The cares and anxieties, the hopes, and the fears, that I should do too much, or not enough for my poor Betsy, I did not wish to trouble you with, or to tell you that my mind has been so agitated...
I have thought day after day, that another should not pass without writing to my much loved Sister; that tomorrow I should have time , & would devote it, to the effusions of Sisterly affection, but I find each day fraught with its cares, & now more peculiarly so by my dear Betsy Quincy’s being sick with a lung fever, in consequence (I suppose) of a sudden cold. She was voilently seized with a...
Least I should forget it, I acknowledge the receipt of ten Dollars you sent while I was at Haverhill, but in the multiplicity of my thoughts I for-got to mention it— you will please to excuse me— I have conversed with Mr Attwood about receiving pay for his expences he absolutely refuses taking anything for his trouble— The extra, charges I have seen payed, by mony Mr Attwood, & I found in his...
Since my last my time has been cheifly occupied, in attending to those services, which were due to our late worthy Nephew— Though we had been in daily expectation of his dissolution, & every breath he drew seemed as if I heard a voice, saying “Sister Spirit come away” yet it was a sudden stroke at the close— As he called the watcher who set by him, Aunt, I suppose he took her for me ; & I was...
Your kind Letter which assured me of your welfare was a cordial to my heart. It came safe to hand, with its contents by Judge Livermore. The affectionate regard it evinced for me, & mine, might have overwhelmed an heart less accustomed to favours; accustomed , not callous I assure you, for esteem, love, & gratitude so often put in motion, fans the finer feelings, & makes them glow with...
Health to my Sister, under a more fervid Sun, than that to which she has hitherto been accustomed. Yes! I most ardently wish you this most needfull blessing, without which all others must be tasteless, even Friends a burden, & grandeur painful.— I hope Queen Mab has told me a falsehood. She came last thursday night in her airy Chariot, drove directly upon my heart, presenting you to me, laying...
If words could express the gratitude I feel for your kindness to me, & my Children, it would be worth while to delineate it upon paper, but as I am sure the attemt would be vain, I can only beg of him to reward you a thousand fold, who alone knows your particular wants, & can amply supply either body, or mind, out of his rich treasury— I sent for Cousin Charles to spend the Sabbath with me, he...