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The Fate of Switzerland is an instructive lesson to america; the newspaper Reports of the ruin of that brave and innocent People are so detached & imperfect, that I have thought it would be useful to obtain a connected & plain account of this afflicting Event.—I explained my wishes to Sir Francis D’Ivernois, who immediately prepared the Letter, a translation of which I have the honor to send...
Some weeks past, I had the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 16th of October; the inclosure was immediately forwarded, though, from the obstructions which interrupted the passage to Hamburgh, I fear it was a long time on its way to Berlin. We are still uncertain what is likely to be the situation of Europe during the approaching summer, and on this topic I can only refer to my...
I avail myself of the opportunity of a vessel about sailing from Hull for Boston, to say that a Danish frigate with a small number of ships under her convoy, having resisted a search attempted by a squadron of British frigates, has together with the merchant ships been captured and sent into an English Port. Several persons on each side were killed in the action between the frigates. If...
In the Paris papers of the 6th. instant is an article respecting the american negotiation, that seems to be drawn up with more care, and greater knowledge of the Subject, than is usual in a mere paragraph of the Editor’s—; and when considered in connexion with the present state of the french press, and the rumours of a like tenor, that have prevailed during the last weeks, leads to the belief...
Overtures, and some direct propositions on the subject of Peace have been made between England & France, as well as between the latter and Austria. indeed it seems that certain preliminaries, not yet entirely disclosed, were signed on the 29. of July at Paris by Count St. Julien on the part of the Emperor, & the disavowal of which at Vienna, has produced the stipulated notice from France that...
I have had the honour to receive your Letters of the 29th. September, and 21. October, and the Bills of which you inform me, amounting together to one thousand Pounds Sterling, have appeared and been duly accepted by me as the agent of your Brother John Quincy Adams Esqr. With great Esteem and Respect &c. NHi : Rufus King Papers.
On the 28 ulto. the Bank of England stopped payment in Specie. And since every Bank in Great Britain has followed the Example; the Directors say the Bank is more than Solvent, exclusive of their capital Stock invested in the Funds. Committees of the two House of Parliament, which have examined the affairs of the Bank, confirm by their Report the Declaration of the Directors, and Associations...
As Mr. Church is the bearer, I refer you to him for what it would take many Pages to relate, and will only say that notwithstanding the injuries we continue to receive from France I still hope, the same policy that has hitherto kept us out of the war, will continue to influence and decide our Government. How the new President will conduct himself in a situation thorny and embarrassing remains...
Unless greater attention is given to the procuring of the requisite evidence in the Cases of Capture than has yet been done, we shall ultimately meet with serious Losses, and give occasion to much Complaint. The Sufferers depend on the Government, and the Government on the Sufferers, and thus that wh. shd. be done is omitted. I inclose to you a copy of notes wh. Mr. Gore & I made this morning...
Lord Malmesbury will leave London in three or four Days for Lille where the conferences between this Country and France are to be held. Opinions fluctuate concerning the Probability of peace. A Struggle evidently exists in France between the Directory & the Legislature, in the latter of which Bodies it is supposed there is a sincere desire of Peace. Some late proceedings in the Legislature, or...
No satisfactory Opinion can yet be formed concerning the termination of the negotiations for Peace. Even those who are supposed to have the best information are without confidence—on the one Hand peace may be concluded sooner than any one thinks probable, on the other the negotiations at Lisle and montebello may be suddenly broken off, and France again engaged with austria as well as England....
We have this day accounts from Paris, which tho~ very important and interesting, are not unexpected. The Breach between the Councils and the directory has for some time destroyed all Prospect of a reconciliation between them; and either an organized civil war, in consequence of the different sides adopted by the several armies, or a Measure like that which has happened, had become...
[ London, November 13, 1797. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c. dates & persons from 1796 to Augt. 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
It will not surprise you to hear that an open Scism, accompanied by mutual reproaches took place between our Envoys before they separated. Mr. Gerry remains at Paris; and there is a strong opinion that great pains will be taken to persuade him to consent to a public reception, in order to deceive and mock his Country with overtures of an insidious negociation. Marshall & Pinckney left Paris...
[ London, May 26, 1798. King’s notation for this letter reads: “Hamilton. Politicks.” Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
We have certain intelligence that the Toulon expedition has sailed. The number of Troops, of Transports, and of men of war are variously stated, but it is known that Buona parte commands and that the fleet is a very great one—its Destination is the subject of inquietude and of conjecture. A few Days will bring us more perfect accounts, and from the Force and Position of the Br. fleet under Ld....
Since writing you a day or two past, I have had the pleasure to receive your Letter by the Packet, and am rejoiced to find my hopes confirmed by your Opinion that we shall not be wanting to ourselves in our Conduct towards France. Immediately on hearing of the proceedings of the Admiralty Judge of st. Domingo, I remonstrated to the Government against them, and was without delay answered that...
[ London, June 8, 1798. Second letter of June 8 not found. ] In the “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries, two letters from King for June 8, 1798, are listed.
[ London, June 27, 1798. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
France will pursue with us the Plan that she has elsewhere found successful. She will endeavour to overthrow us by the Divisions among ourselves which she will excite and support by all the means of which she is mistress. The Paris Papers of the 18. ulto. say le Citoyen Roziers est nommé Consul Genl. aux Etats unis. Gamier (en convenl. de Saintes) consul, & Boscq vice consul à Wilmington,...
Buena parte has made the Debut of the campaigne by the easy tho important conquest of Malta. This Island has been supposed impregnable and therefore was the Depositary of great wealth removed there from Italy. It contained likewise an excellent arensal, two or three ships of the Line, and as many as 6.000 excellent Seamen. It was the maltese Seamen who made the fine campaign under Suffrein in...
I send you inclosed an interesting little piece addressed to Gallatin by a former Citizen of Geneva—if translated and published it may do good. We have no news from the mediterranean since the Capture of Malta, nor can we do more than conjecture the future destination of Buonaparte. Turin with its arsenals is possessed by a french army, so that Sardignia is at the feet of the Directory. The...
[ London, July 21, 1798. Kings notation of this letter reads: “Hamilton. Duplicates of address Gallatin.” Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City. See King to H, July 14, 1798 .
You will believe that I have been much gratified with the late intelligence from home. France has calculated all her plans on our decisions, and the expectation that her friends if not more numerous, would be more active, and possess greater energy, than the friends of our Government—or rather she has believed that our Government like that of every country, that she has succeeded to overturn...
[ London, August 1, 1798. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
Tho’ I have very great confidence in the integrity of my Agent Mr Low, I Consider it to be a measure of prudence to be attentive to the Security of my property in his hands: I don’t know that he is much connected in any of those Speculations which too many of our friends have gone into, nor have I any reason to suppose him engaged in any business of hazard. Still I have concluded to request...
[ London, August 18, 1798. King’s notation of this letter reads: “Hamilton & President. Letters from Miranda forwarded.” Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City. Francisco de Miranda to H, August 17, 1798 . For Miranda’s letter to John Adams, also dated August 17,...
[ Margate, England, September 13, 1798. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
I am charmed with the military appointments; in the main they are quite what they should be—such chiefs ought to give Glory as well as Security to their Country, and they will do both, if the occasions offer. You see that I relapse into my former strain. I know not what you and others whose Sentiments I respect may think, but I must unsettle all that is best settled in my opinions of the...
You will have no war! France will propose to renew the negotiation upon the Basis laid down in the Presidents Instructions to the Envoys —at least so I conjecture. If the negotiation is recommenced the most obvious precaution suggests the expediency of confiding it to hands above all suspicion. We see that we have nothing to fear from the arms of France; all her skill, and energy, &...