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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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You have a mind, active, highly informed, and benevolent. I avail myself of all these qualities in addressing to you the following request. I mentioned to you when you were here, that we had in contemplation in Virginia to establish an university or college on a reformed plan: omitting those branches of science no longer useful or valued, tho hitherto kept up in all colleges, and introducing...
I know, my dear friend, that you sent me, so long ago as August, the much desired, and much valued piece on education , which I read with great pleasure, and ought to have acknoleged it’s receipt. but when I am at home there are so many delicious occupations of the more active kind that it is as difficult to drag me to my writing table, as to get a horse, broken loose from confinement, to...
I am happy in having seen here M. Bureau Pusy. the relation in which he stands to two persons whom I so much esteem as yourself and M. de la Fayette, as well as his own merit ensured him my best wishes. he is now on the wing as well as myself. I have therefore only time to inform you that about three weeks ago you were chosen a member of the American Philosophical society by an unanimous vote....
I have to acknolege the reciept of your favors of Feb. 5. & 9. and to thank you for the pamphlet contained in the former one which was a desideratum to me. I will forward the diplomas to Chr. Livingston & mr Stewart. the latter is almost out of date. I am Dear Sir Your most obedt. servt PrC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “Mr. Andrew Ellicot”; endorsed by TJ in ink on verso. Ellicott’s letter of 9...
I recieved a little before I left home your favor of Oct. 17. as I had in due time the preceding one. the attractive nature of country employments are my apology to my friends for being a very unpunctual correspondent while at home. having no refuge here from my room and writing table, it is here that I fetch up the lee-way of my correspondence. I am glad to hear you are ready for printing...
I have to acknoledge the reciept of your friendly letter of the 5th instant . I had before heard of the melancholy situation of mrs Skipwith and, whatever reason might suggest as less painful than that was to herself and her friends, yet affection could not learn the event without a shock, and a tender recollection of former scenes on which the curtain is now forever drawn. but we shall join...
It is with sincere pleasure I learn that Wayles and Maria have concluded to run their course of life together. From his prudence I presume he has not proceeded thus far without knowing it would be agreeable to Mrs. Eppes and yourself. I have thought it right on this occasion to do precisely what I did on a former similar one. I have made what I gave to my daughter Randolph the measure of what...
I wrote you last on the 11th. of April, & the day after recieved yours of Apr. 4 . I inclosed you at the same time the communications just then recieved from our envoys. others are lately recieved, but, as far as made known to us, they contain only a long memorial given in by them, justifying all our complaints , and repelling those of France. it takes up the subject from the time of Genet’s...
My last was to Maria of the 12th. of Feb. I have been discouraged from writing under the apprehension that my letters did not get to you. I therefore inclosed that to mr Jefferson. since this I have recieved yours of Feb. 7. 10. 16. & 20. by which I have had acknolege ments of the receipt of all mine except of Dec. 21. & my last of Feb. 12. this I shall hear of in due time. the former was sent...
Yours of Jan. 20. & 24. are duly recieved. in the former you mention the reciept of £40. for me, and Maria’s of the next day says that mr Eppes expected to recieve £30. more for me at the ensuing Cumberland court. not having heard from mr Randolph on the subject of the hire of your negroes, I was in the moment of recieving your letter, just about to inclose you a draught on George Jefferson...
My last letter from Maria was of Mar. 20. & from yourself of Feb. 8 . the dates of my latest to Maria were of Apr. 1. Mar. 7. and to yourself of Feb. 18. you have seen in the papers the resolutions proposed by mr Sprigg, the first of which was that under existing circumstances it is not expedient to resort to war with France. it is very uncertain how this would have been decided. but the...
Your favor from the Hundred came to hand the [day before] yesterday. I have been detained here a week by bad weather. [this morn]ing mr Nicholas & myself breakfasted at Sun-rise to set out: but heavy snow is now come on. we shall start as soon as it holds up. our election was yesterday. Woods carried it against P. Carr by 247. against 122 votes. those of your people who were unwell when you...
I wrote you last on the 1st. inst. and three days ago recieved Maria’s of the same date. we have intelligence which seems to be authentic that the Spaniards have delivered up the posts on the Missisipi. this is the more welcome, as the commencement of war in that quarter seemed more imminent than it is with France. we are certainly more indebted for avoiding it to the good sense & moderation...
I wrote to my dear Maria on the 1st. inst. and covered it in one to yourself on the 3d . I have not yet recieved any letters either from you or Monticello since I left home, now five weeks.—you will have seen the debates on Logan’s law, as it is called. the forged paper they endeavored to palm on the H. of R. as if written & presented by Logan to the French directory, being made appear to have...
Your favor of Jan. 1. came to me on the 18th. that of the 12th. was recieved yesterday . the one you mention from the Hundred has never been recieved. none of these acknolege the receipt of mine of Dec. 21. the day I left Monticello. on the 30th. of Dec. I inclosed you some pamphlets, not writing as you know I mentioned my design of writing little for a year to come. on the 17th. inst. I wrote...
We have for some time past had as little communication almost as if we did not know how to write. mr Randolph’s journies have given us mutual information of the welfare of both families & of course has lessened the occasion for writing. your prospect of a crop here has been as good as could be, independant of the seasons. but there has been through the whole of this part of the country an...
I wrote to Maria on the 15th. inst. yours of the 12th. was recieved on the 18th. mr Tyler who was the bearer of my letter to Maria, set out so instantly after the event of the election that I could not write, but as he had promised to send Maria’s letter, he would probably notify that event at the same time. I cannot regret entirely the disappointment of meeting Maria & yourself at Monticello...
I wrote to you Dec. 23. via Petersburg, and to Maria Jan. 4. via City point. neither seems to have reached you Jan. 12. the date of your letter which came to hand yesterday. I answer it immediately according to my promise to Maria. and if mine be acknoleged as soon as you recieve it, we may hear from each other regularly every fortnight, as a letter is but 6 days going hence to Richmond, and...
I arrived here on the 4th. day of my journey without accident, & found myself better provided with lodgings than I expected. in general Congress is comfortably & conveniently lodged; dearer however than at Philadelphia; in my own case considerably so. the French treaty will meet considerable opposition in Senate. the judiciary system is again brought forward, & there is great fear will...
In a letter to Maria, of the 6th. inst. I acknoleged the receipt of yours of Mar. 16. & 24. finding that Patsy has got home, I am in hopes that the expectations expressed in that of the 24th. that Maria would be well in a few days, have been realised; & that this long & painful scene for us all will be closed with a return of health. the two houses have at length agreed to adjourn on the 2d....
I recieved yesterday a letter from Doctr. Taylor informing me he had paid very nearly the whole sum he owed me to mr Hanson, whose certificate was in the hands of French on it’s way to me. as soon as I recieve this certificate I shall not hesitate to redeliver to him the patents of the mortgaged lands in Greenbriar &c. be so good therefore as to leave them with mr Eppes, praying him barely to...
Presuming that you get the newspapers I shall not repeat the public news which they detail. The great victory obtained by the English over the Dutch fleet is placed beyond doubt, they have taken 9 out of 16. As to the proceedings of Congress, they have passed a bill putting off the commencement of the Stamp act till July next. The land tax will not be taken up this session. It is suspected...
Yours of Mar. 20. came to hand yesterday. you are not aware of the consequences of writing me a letter in so fair a hand, and one so easily read. it puts you in great danger of the office of private secretary at Monticello, which would sometimes be a laborious one. your letter was 11. days coming here, and mr Eppes’s of Feb. 8. was 19. days on it’s way. this shews that there is something wrong...
I wrote to mr Eppes three weeks ago. immediately after the date of that letter Lucy increased her family. she is doing well except as to her breasts. the one so much out of order when you went away, still continues in the same state, and the other threatens to rise also, which would entirely prevent her giving suck. she could not be moved in their present condition. I expect to set out for...
I left Monticello the 18th. of Dec. and arrived here to breakfast on the 25th. having experienced no accident or inconvenience except a slight cold, which brought back the inflammation of my eyes and still continues it, though so far mended as to give hopes of it’s going off soon. I took my place in Senate before a single bill was brought in or other act of business done, except the Address...
We have heard not a word of you since the moment you left us. I hope you had a safe & pleasant journey. the rains which began to fall here the next day gave me uneasiness lest they should have overtaken you also. Dr. and mrs Bache have been with us till the day before yesterday. mrs Monroe is now in our neighborhood to continue during the sickly months. our Forte-piano arrived a day or two...
I wrote you last on the 18th. of May since which [I have recieved mr Eppes’s] letter of May 20. and yours of May 27. I have deter[mined to set out from] this place on the 20th. inst. and shall, in my letters of tomorrow, [order my horses] to meet me at Fredericksburg on the 24th. and may therefore be at home on the 26th. or 27th. where I shall hope to have the happiness of meeting you. I can...
It is very long since I have heard from Eppington. the last letter I [recieved?] was from mr Eppes dated Apr. 4. so long without hearing from you, I cannot be without uneasiness for your health. I have been constantly in the hope that we were within 3. or 4. weeks of rising, but so often disappointed I begin to lose my faith as to any period of adjournment; and some begin now openly to avow...
I am this moment arrived here, and the post being about to depart, I set down to inform you of it. your sister came over with me from Belmont where we left all well. the family will move over the day after tomorrow. they give up the house there about a week hence. we want nothing now to fill up our happiness but to have you & mr Eppes here. scarcely a stroke has been done towards covering the...
You will be surprised at receiving a letter from me dated here at this time. But a series of bad weather having suspended our works many days, has caused my detention. I have for some time had my trunk packed and issued my last orders, and been only waiting for it to cease raining. But it still rains. I have a bad prospect of rivers and roads before me. Your sister removed to Belmont about...
I arrived here on the 3d. inst. expecting to have found you here and we have been ever since imagining that every sound we heard was that of the carriage which was once more to bring us together. it was not till yesterday I learnt by the reciept of mr Eppes’s letter of June 30th. that you had been sick, and were only on the recovery at that date. a preceding letter of his, referred to in that...
I have at length, my ever dear Maria, recieved by mr Eppes’s letter of Mar. 24. the welcome news of your recovery. welcome indeed to me, who have past a long season of inexpressible anxiety for you: and the more so as written accounts can hardly give one an exact idea of the situation of a sick person. I wish I were able now to leave this place & join you. but we do not count on rising till...
Your letter, my dear Maria, of Mar. 13. came safely to hand and gave us the information, always the subject of anxiety, & therefore always welcome, that yourself and mr Eppes were well. it would yet have been better that we could all have been well together, as the health we enjoy separately would be more enjoyed together. whether we can visit you is still uncertain, my presence here is so...
Washington Jan. 4. 1800. [i.e., 1801] Your letter, my dear Maria, of Dec. 28. is just now recieved, and shall be instantly answered, as shall all others recieved from yourself or mr Eppes. this will keep our accounts even, and shew by the comparative promptness of reply which is most anxious to hear from the other. I wrote to mr Eppes Dec. 23. but directed it to Petersburg. hereafter it shall...
Your letter, my dear Maria, of Jan. 21. was recieved two days ago. it was, as Ossian says, or would say, like the bright beams of the moon on the desolate heath. environed here in scenes of constant torment, malice & obloquy, worn down in a station where no effort to render service can avail any thing, I feel not that existence is a blessing but when something recalls my mind to my family or...
I recieved at Monticello two letters from you , & meant to have answered them a little before my departure for this place; but business so crouded on me at that moment that it was not in my power. I left home on the 21st. & arrived here on the 28th. of Dec. after a pleasant journey of fine weather and good roads, & without having experienced any inconvenience. the Senate had not yet entered...
I have recieved yours, my dear Maria, of Feb. 1. and with that extreme gratification with which I recieve all the marks of your affection. my impatience to get from hence is urged by the double motives of escaping from irksome scenes here, and meeting yourself and others dear to us both. no time is yet spoken of for our adjournment; yet as there is likely to arise nothing which might keep...
Your letter, my dear Maria, of the 2d. inst. came to hand on the 8th. I should have answered it instantly according to our arrangement, but that I thought, by waiting till the 11th. I might possibly be able to communicate something on the subject of the election. however, after 4. days of balloting, they are exactly where they were on the first. there is a strong expectation in some that they...
I arrived here, my dear Maria, on the 3d. inst. and was in the daily hope of recieving you, when mr Eppes’s letter of June 30. by the post of day before yesterday, gave us the first notice of your being sick. some preceding letter we infer had explained the nature of your indisposition, but it has never come to hand. we are therefore still uninformed of it. your sister & myself wrote yesterday...
Mr. Eppes’s letter of Jan. 17 . had filled me with anxiety for your little one, & that of the 25th. announced what I had feared. how deeply I feel it in all it’s bearings, I shall not say, nor attempt consolation where I know that time & silence are the only medecines. I shall only observe as a source of hope to us all that you are young and will not fail to possess enough of these dear...
I acknowleged, my dear Maria, the reciept of yours in a letter I wrote to mr Eppes. it gave me the welcome news that your sprain was well. but you are not to suppose it entirely so. the joint will remain weak for a considerable time, & give you occasional pains much longer. the state of things at Chesnut grove is truly distressing. mr B.’s habitual intoxication will destroy himself, his...
You mentioned to me in conversation here that you sometimes saw my former servant James, & that he made his engagements such as to keep himself always free to come to me. could I get the favor of you to send for him & to tell him I shall be glad to recieve him as soon as he can come to me? Francis Sayes who also lived with me formerly and, since that, with you, came here some time ago to offer...
Th: Jefferson returns his thanks to mr Fennel for the Dissertation on his method of making salt. the theory is certainly promising. what may be the actual result depends on so many circumstances as to require experiment to found an estimate. having no experience on the subject himself, he is entirely unable to give an opinion: but doubts not that mr Fennel has sufficiently verified his process...
Your favor of Mar. 25. came safely to hand with the grains of [corn it covered] for which accept my thanks. A nephew of mine, Mr. S. Carr who married a daughter of the Mr. Carr near Georgetown, setting out this day for that place, I have sent him some of the peas you [desired] which he will inclose under cover to you, and lodge in the care of Mr. John Thompson Mason. This letter goes...
I am favored with yours of May 19. and thank you for your intentions as to the corn and the large white clover, which if forwarded to Mr. Archibald Stuart at Staunton will find daily means of conveyance from thence to me. That indeed is the nearest post road between you and myself by 60. or 70. miles, the one by George town being very circuitous. The representatives have at length got through...
I have yet to acknolege your last favor which I recieved at Monticello, and therefore cannot now recur to the date. the perversion of the expressions of a former letter to you, which you mention to have been made in the newspapers, I had not till then heard of. yet the spirit of it was not new. I have been for some time used as the property of the newspapers, a fair mark for every man’s dirt....
I am much obliged to you for the pamphlet you Sent me, and have only to regret that there is not a more general circulation of that and Such like publications throughout the United States—as it would have a great tendency to enlighten many honest well meaning persons who are Deceived and Missled by those who have been employed throughout the United States to represent and missrepresent with a...
I know well that you were a clerk in the Treasury Department while I was in the office of Secretary of State; but as I had no relation with the interior affairs of that office, I had no opportunity of being acquainted with you personally, except the single occasion on which you called on me. The length of time you were in the office affords the best presumption in your favour, and the...
It would have highly gratified me had it been in my power to furnish the relief you ask: but I am preparing for my departure and find, on winding up my affairs, that I shall not have one dollar to spare . It is therefore with sincere regret I have nothing better to tender than the sentiments of good will of Sir, Your most obedient servant, MS not found; reprinted from Hamilton, Observations,...
I thank you for the pamphlet of Erskine inclosed in your favor of the 9th. inst. and still more for the evidence which your letter afforded me of the health of your mind and I hope of body also. Erskine has been reprinted here and has done good. It has refreshed the memory of those who had been willing to forget how the war between France and England has been produced; and who ape-ing St....