Thomas Jefferson Papers
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From Thomas Jefferson to George Jefferson, 5 September 1800

To George Jefferson

Monticello Sep. 5 1800.

Dear Sir

On the 4th. of Aug. I drew on you in favor of Rhodes for 168.82 D. this by my statement would be somewhat over the funds I had in your hands, besides which you have paid articles of freight, drayage &c of which I have no account. I now inclose you a draught on John Barnes at George town1 for 200. D. tho’ it must be presented to him there, yet it is payable at the bank of the US. in Philadelphia. whether this kind of draught, or one payable at George town is most negociable with you I should wish to be informed, as in the 1st. week of the ensuing month mr Barnes will have funds of mine in his hands which I shall wish to draw. Our sheriffs will be going to Richmond about the 22d. inst. (or a little before the 1st. of October) to pay up their collection. I shall give them draughts on you for my taxes, and also for some sums assumed by me for others. not possessing a statement of them, I do not know whether the inclosed draught will cover them, but you shall be furnished with another amply sufficient payable at Georgetown or Philadelphia as best suits you, the first week in Octob. if this can be disposed of for cash it will provide you for my draught. if not, they may perhaps leave me in arrears with you a few days. I pray you in that case to make the advance for me for a few days, as the sheriffs will be liable to a penalty if they do not pay into the treasury at a fixed day. by the next post I shall be able to inform you what my draught may be probably one or two hundred dollars beyond the bill inclosed—mr Barnes sent from Philadelphia directed to you,2 in April I think, a [box] containing a pair of mahogany dining tables addressed to mr Eppes, marked probably I.W.E. I do not know by what vessel they came but they left Philadelphia while I was there. they came, I believe, alone. mr Eppes says that on application to you you cannot find them. still I think they must be in your warehouse. I pray you to search well. in the mean time I write to mr Barnes on the subject. I am Dear Sir

Your’s affectionately

Th: Jefferson

PrC (MHi); faint; at foot of text: “Mr George Jefferson”; endorsed by TJ in ink on verso. Enclosure not found.

Matthew Rodes (Rhodes) collected the federal direct tax enacted in 1798 on land, houses, and slaves. According to TJ’s financial records, the tax on his Albemarle County lands amounted to $97.75; the tax on Monticello, valued at $6,000, was $30; the tax on 65 slaves amounted to $32.50; and the federal tax on his phaeton was $9. The correct total was $169.25, but TJ continued to refer to it as $168.62 (MB description begins James A. Bear, Jr., and Lucia C. Stanton, eds., Jefferson’s Memorandum Books: Accounts, with Legal Records and Miscellany, 1767–1826, Princeton, 1997, The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Second Series description ends , 2:1023–4).

Draughts on you for my taxes: TJ gave Alexander Garrett a payment of $104.63 for his taxes and fees in St. Anne’s Parish, where Monticello was located. The amount included $10.24 for William Short’s taxes. TJ’s taxes in Fredericksville Parish amounted to only $11.15, but he gave Joel Yancey an order for $264.31. Of that $170 was for money TJ received from Yancey on 4 and 15 Sep., to be repaid in Richmond. The remainder was for sums assumed by TJ for others, including $21.19 for William Davenport, $28.64 for Ann and Walter Key, $7 for James Key, and $26.33 for John H. Buck (MB description begins James A. Bear, Jr., and Lucia C. Stanton, eds., Jefferson’s Memorandum Books: Accounts, with Legal Records and Miscellany, 1767–1826, Princeton, 1997, The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Second Series description ends , 1:40n; 2:1023–7).

1TJ interlined “for 200. D.”

2Preceding three words interlined.

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