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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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In announcing to you Mrs. Hamilton’s acceptance of your obliging present and conveying to you the acknowlegements which she charges me to make to you I abandon the reluctance which I might otherwise feel to my sensibility at a mark of your attention so delicately conveyed. The discharge of my professional duty towards you with all the zeal which the nature of the case demands has no ⟨claim...
Your last letter, My Dear Sir, has given me great pain; not only because it informed me that the opinion in favour of Mr. Burr was increasing among the Fœderalists, but because it also told me that Mr. Sedgwick was one of its partizans. I have a letter from this Gentleman in which he expresses decidedly his preference of Mr. Jefferson. I hope you have been mistaken and that it is not possible...
Letters which myself and others have received from Washington give me much alarm at the prospect that Mr. Burr may be supported by the Fœderalists in preference to Mr. Jefferson. Be assured, my Dear Sir, that this would be a fatal mistake. From a thorough knowlege of the character I can pronounce with confidence that Mr. Burr is the last man in the UStates to be supported by the Fœderalists. 1...
Several letters to myself & others from the City of Washington, excite in my mind extreme alarm on the subject of the future President. It seems nearly ascertained that Jefferson & Burr will come into the house of Rs. with equal votes, and those letters express the probability that the Fœderal Party may prefer the latter. In my opinion a circumstance more ruinous to them, or more disastrous to...
[ New York, December 26, 1800. On January 1, 1801, Marshall wrote to Hamilton : “I receivd this morning your letter of the 26th of Decr.” Letter not found. ]
The post of yesterday gave me the pleasure of a letter from you. I thank you for the communication. I trust that a letter which I wrote you the day before the receipt of yours will have duly reached you as it contains some very free & confidential observations ending in two results—1 That The Convention with France ought to be ratified as the least of two evils 2 That on the same ground...
I will run the risk with you of giving countenance to a charge lately brought against me, though it has certainly had a very false direction—I mean that of being fond of giving advice. Several friends at Washington inform me, that there is likely to be much hesitation in the Senate about ratifying the Convention with France. I do not wonder at it, and yet I should be sorry that it should...
[ New York, December 24, 1800. On January 9, 1801, Gunn wrote to Hamilton : “I have received your favor of the 24th. Ult. Letter not found. ]
Burr loves nothing but himself; thinks of nothing but his own aggrandizement, and will be content with nothing, short of permanent power in his own hands. No compact that he should make with any passion in his breast, except ambition, could be relied upon by himself. How then should we be able to rely upon any agreement with him. Jefferson, I suspect, will not dare much. Burr will dare every...
I intirely agree with you, My Dear Sir, that in the event of Jefferson and Burr coming to the House of Represnetatives the former is to be preferred. The appointment of Burr, as President would disgrace our Country abroad. No agreement with him could be relied upon. His private circumstances render disorder a necessary resource. His public principles offer no obstacle. His ambition aims at...