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    • Adams, John
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    • Adams, Thomas Boylston
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On a lu, Tabius, avec beaucoup de plaisir. Il est tres Sage, tres savant et tres elegant.—The Article he vindicates is now well understood here and is I believe universally allowed to be no Violation of our Engagements with any other power.—Even higher and Stronger ground is taken by Some of the ablest Lawyers and it is even contended that we had a right to go back to the Statu quo, and revive...
You have it right in yours of 22d.—A Rivalry between George Cabbot and Elbridge Gerry, for the Title of Excellency in Massachusetts, produced all the opposition of Federalists in that State to my Administration and has now thrown the whole Party in the back ground. I am afraid that is not the worst. Their unbridled rage and violent opposition to Peace with France, will exasperate the opposite...
Yours of the 20th. is before me.——The Senate I hear is perfectly satisfied at length, by a Message and Some papers I Sent them this Week at their request, that there is no Collision between The Convention with France and our Treaty with England: but other points labour, I choose not to say at present what I think. There has been, about two or three hundred Persons in the Union, who from the...
In your Letter of the 9th, you say, that you will not say you disagree with Manlius, in his opinion, that the downfall of the federal Cause is to be attributed to the Mission to France—In this opinion I fully believe that both of you are mistaken; and I am confident, I could convince you of this, if I had an opportunity of recalling to your recollection, the Passages of the times before and...
I thank you for yours of the 9th and its contents, and for the pains to have taken to Search Authorities upon the Collision of Treaties. The Point I think is explained and proved very fully, and So it is understood in England. The Sixth Article however is by no means nugatory. It is of great importance to France. Our Treaty with Britain expires in two years after the termination of the present...
In one of your Letters you say there is much murmuring concerning the Convention with France. This is natural. Those who have laboured to defeat the Negotiation and those who have endeavoured to make it unpopular, from the beginning will still strive to defeat and to disgrace the Result. I shall confine myself at present to one point the apparent Collision between this Convention and our...
I have appointed Mr. Jay, Chief Justice. He may refuse, if he should, I shall follow the line of judges most probably,& then there will be a vacancy. I wish to know if Mr. Ingersoll would accept an appointment as one of the assistant Justices of the superior court, & in that case I wish for his opinion as well as yours of the proper character for the office of district Attorney. Will Mr....
I have recd this Evening yours of the 14th. My little bark has been oversett in a Squal of Thunder and Lightening and hail attended with a Strong Smell of Sulphur. Nothing remains for me, but to indulge that Vanity which I have found out lately is considered as the predominant feature in my Character, by Singing the Song of Horace Virtus repulsæ nescia sordidæ Intaminatis fulget honoribus Nec...
Upon the subject of your letter of the 1st. I can only say that I was prepared to hear all that you relate before I heard it from his wife and Col. Smith. A being so lost to all sense of morality & all social feelings cannot be reclaimed. There is MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I am greatly pleased with your letter of the 30 Aug. Every part of it shows a sound understanding & a manly honest heart. Your conduct at the meetings was wise as well as generous. Never mind majorities. Weigh well & judge right & never fear being in a minority. You are right to mix with your fellow citizens at their invitation to their consultations. Although Horatius has sacrificed to the...
I received last night your favor of the 18th. I thank you for your account of the proceedings of the Supreme court.—I really believe you are right & that I was erroneous, in what we have said about the influence of politicks at the bar in Pensylvania. Indeed any where affected politicks do a man no good. I did not mean to prejudice you against your Quakers friends, who I doubt not are...
I thank you for your favour of July 26. I always rejoice to hear of your Arguing Causes. This Arguing is the way to business. Argue; Argue; Argue; forever when you can, and never be concerned about the issue, any further than you ought to interest yourself for truth and Justice. If you Speak in public, tho you loose your cause, it will Serve your reputation, if you Speak well, as much as if...
I have not received a letter from you since I left you. As I hear nothing of the epidemic in Philadelphia, I begin to hope that such a calamity will this year be spared to that city. I should be gratified to hear of your health and success. I could fill a sheet with curious anecdotes of politicks & electioneering, but as this is a subject on which I ought not to permit myself to write speak or...
Since you are desirous of a Confidence in the Breast of your Father, and he is not less anxious to possess one in yours, I will open myself to you as soon as time will permit, upon Several Subjects and without assuming to dictate or controul will give you my candid, and frank advice. Although you have had a regular Education in the Theory and Practice of the Law, under a Master as eminent as...
I received last night your favour of the 15th, the Sentiments and expressions of which are Such as are such as cannot fail to render your Character Prosperity and Happiness more dear to me than ever. An Office must be procured, and the Price or Rent must not be an Obstacle. I had rather pay for you a high Rent than you should not have an Office in Market or Chesnut Street. Your Brothers...
The daily Duties of my office require so much Writing that my hand and head are fatigued & exhausted before I have half done: and this must be my apology for not writing you till now. I hope you are now well settled in your Office and pursuing your studies. Practice will come in time, but the most certainly from an incessant Attendance upon the courts and taking minutes & making Reports of...
I have rec d your charming narration of your Tour to Paris, both to me and your mother, and am happy to find you were so civilly treated and so well pleased. I shall never forget the kindness of my Friend Arnoux to myself or to you. I congratulate you, on your new Acquisition of a Sister. I Suppose this match grew out of a Spark that was kindled at Nantes in 1779 when your Brother was with me...
Your Brother is appointed to Berlin, but you I presume will soon return to America; perhaps you may be upon your passage, and this Letter may not reach you, before You Sail I long to see you, but yet I am Very sensible it must be a cruel separation to your Brother— Who he can obtain for a Secretary I know not. The family is all here, and are as happy as the absence of all our Children, and the...
I am very much concerned, least you as well as your Brother, should think hard of me, for neglecting so long to write to you, but the multiplied Cares and engagements of Life added to indifferent health must plead my Excuse M r: Murray is to take the place of your Brother, and M r. Dandridge is to be his private Secretary, your brother will go to Lisbon, and you I hope will return to...