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I received p r. post yours of the 17 th this day. I shall forward your Letter to the Children. I received a Letter from mrs Johnson of the 12 th in which she says mr Cranch’s wounds were healing, that the most dangerous was just below the Hair, two other upon the side of the head. the skull was laid bare. the Bravadoes struck him twice after he was sensless upon the Ground, and for no other...
I received your two letters of April 5th and 7th, yesterday, and I enclosed you two from the children, in a letter to your brother this week, receiving them on that day; and not having time to write to you, before the post went. I do not think I have so frequently written to you for a month past, as I did through the winter; and it is because I have felt less anxious for you since the Col.’s...
I Congratulate you my dear son, upon your safe arrival in your Native Country; and myself that I have the prospect of seeing you again, a prospect which for many Months I had no hopes of realizing, as your Father can inform you, and to the very low state of my Health, it is oweing that I cannot so soon as I wish enjoy the pleasure of Welcomeing you Home; and meeting you at Philadelphia, where...
I arrived here this day week, but have been so constantly occupied in seeing company that I have not had time to write a single Line. I received your Letter which I suppose had been on to Philadelphia, on fryday last, in the full Faith that mr Peabody & you would comply with our request. I took the Children, and brought them with me. John is somewhat indisposed with a return of his Ague— I...
Mrs Smith appeard so anxious and unhappy tho She Said nothing, that seeing it, I advised her to follow you, & sent Michial to Town hoping she would overtake you tomorrow. she appeard so rejoiced at the proposal, that in half an hour, she was gone. I hope She will overtake you by tomorrow night. I slept well last night & tho I feel very low spirited, I shall strive to be [co]ntent. I will...
I have rejoiced in the fine weather which we have had Since your absence, and tho to day it threatens a Change, and debilitates me, I hope it will not prove very urksome to you. I received your Letter written at Flags and should have rejoiced more in your progress, if it had not have distanced you further from Mrs smith who was following you with all speed— I fear she did not overtake you...
I received an hour ago your Letters of the 22 d and 27th. I have been anxious enough for you since I saw the proclamation. I advised you to take for your cough Rhubarb & calomil. do not omit it, but take it immediatly. it will serve You for the complaint which usually afflicts you in the spring as well as for your cough. I will obey the summons as soon as possible but there are many...
I received yesterday your obliging favour of Feb’ ry 27th. I have been so little a favorite of fortune, that I never once examined my Numbers by the News papers, or otherways, concluding that those who were equally interested would take proper care for me. as I had formd no expectations, I meet with no dissapointment, and am quite pleased that my adventure should be appropriated to the...
I am much mortified and dissapointed that I cannot have the pleasure which I anticipated of visiting you with the Chilrdren on their Return to Atkinson. I was threatned last week with a return of the complaint under which I labourd last summer; but I was in hopes it would go of, and that a Ride would serve me but I have not found it so. my things were all put up yesterday to sit out, but I am...
As the vessel by which I have already written to you, did not sail yesterday, I can now inform you that the Bill for the protection of our commerce past yesterday in the House of Rep’s 50 to 40— it impowers our vessels of war to capture, and bring in all French cruizers and Privateers which shall be found hovering upon our Coast.— it will pass into a Law tomorrow. We are still in the dark why...
Dr Tufts has been consulted by me respecting the leaseing our places, and we have come to an agreement with the Tennants, who in proportion to the rise of Labour & produce, Annually expect more & more indulgences. a Farmer cannot be content with the profits he once made. he will tell you, the Day Labourer fares better, which is true. I meet with so many difficulties, that I wish Sometimes that...
As you was absent when I left home I was unable to pay you for some articles which you had purchased for me, as well as some which mrs smith had procured for me. if you will be so good as to forward me the amount, I will transmit it to you— When I pay’d mr Fothingham for the Carriage, there were the quarter Lights and some other matters which made the carriage amount to more than our first...
The Death of my Mother which took place this afternoon very suddenly, will prevent my Sitting out on my journey as I had intended on twesday. we propose to burry her on Monday. I do not think I can get away untill thursday. I shall therefore omit sending Beckey untill fryday. I would wish two places engaged in the Stage as I have an other Girl to go with her, and should like to have them under...
If the Compass by which my course is directed does not vary again through unavoidable necessity I shall sit out for Quincy next week. we shall probably be 12 days in comeing. I shall want some preparation at Home. I will write to you from N york. Betsy wrote to her Mother to know if her sister Nancy was at home & that I should want her during my stay at Quincy The Hot weather of july has...
Judge Blodget is here again, and offers to take Letters to you. he says he call’d and that you was not at home, nor My Dear Cousin Betsy for whose Health I feel not a little anxious— how is she? has she a fever? has she a cough? would not a journey serve her? has she been bled? I hear from you but seldom. You would write oftner if you was a little more careless. I mean if you did not attend so...
I received your Letter of July 12. I am inclined to think your last determination will prove a judicious one. I most sincerely hope it will. The President expects to leave this city next week. we shall go Northward for a Month or two. I could have wisht that my Health would have permitted me, to have visited the new city at this season; but the Heat is so great that I dare not make the...
I received your Letter of June 20th with one for mrs Adams which I shall forward in a few day’s. I am Sorry to learn that your Health & spirits are depressed. I know well that want of Health mars every other enjoyment. You must Call Reason & Philosophy to your Aid, nor let the untoward occurrences of Life too much depress you. “Man wants but little here below, nor want that little long” are...
I have received but one Letter from you Since I left Quincy now near a Month; I have been here three weeks, except 3 days which I past at my sons in N york— next Monday I leave here for Philadelphia where it is thought we may now go with safety— I was in hopes to have taken Mrs smith with me, but her situation is difficult not having received any advise what to do, and She is loth to go for...
I yesterday received your kind Letter of March 5 th and congratulate you and the Judge upon your safe arrival at N york. I assure you I was under serious apprehensions for your safety when I found you gone; I had sent Betsy to your Lodgings to inquire after your Health, a few moments after you were gone. I did not know how to credit it when she returnd with the News— I will not say, you took...
I cannot say that I write you from my Solitude, for who can call themselves Solitary, when in the society and company of a beloved son, who has been long absent, and who returns to his native Land, with a plentifull supply of the flowers and fruits which he has judiciously selected, from the various Countries into which he has traveld. he appears very happy surrounded by the Books in the...
I write you this Morning just to say that there are dispatches from our Envoys up to April by which it appears that they have had several conferences with Tallyrand, the subject of which was obtaining Money— they are just decupherd and will be communicated. no Reception from the directory, nor like to be any— I cannot but say to you, what will strike every one, that every hour they remain in...
We leave this place this morning & hope to reach Home on fryday of the next week. I have written to mr smith to procure sundry articles for me in Boston which will require a Team to bring them to Quincy, & bags for oats will you be so good as to consult with mr Porter, and if mr Belcher can go to Town for them So as to get them up before we arrive I should be very glad. will you be so kind as...
I inclose to you a pamphlet, The correspondence between the Secretary of state, and the French Minister, for my son J Q Adams. if upon receiving it, you have reason to think he has allready had it; from any other hand, you will retain it, untill his arrival in England. William Vans Murray, of the state of Maryland, is appointed Minister Plenipotentiary to the Batavian Republick. This Gentleman...
The extreem heat of yesterday & the no less prospet of it this day, is beyond any thing I ever experienced in my Life the Glasses were at 90 in the Shade yesterday. tomorrow will be the 4 July, when if possible I must see thousands. I know not how it will be possible to get through. live here I cannot an other week unless a Change takes place in the weather you had as good be in an oven the...
We left Philadelphia on Wedensday last, the day preceeding was very Hot a partial Rain had waterd the Roads for 15 or 20 miles So as to render the first part of our journey pleasent, we were overtaken by showers—and detaind by them, but on thursday we found clouds of dust for want of Rain, troops and calvacades did not lessen it, and the Heat was intolerably oppressive, so much so as to nearly...
This, I hope, is the last letter which you will receive from me at Quincy. The funeral rites performed, I prepare to set out on the morrow. I long to leave a place, where every scene and object wears a gloom, or looks so to me. My agitated mind wants repose. I have twice the present week met my friends and relatives, and taken leave of them in houses of mourning. I have asked, “Was all this...
Taking up your paper yesterday morning, I was shockd at the Misrepresentation a Writer in your paper has given to the nomination and appointment of J Q. Adams, to sweeden for the purpose of renewing the Treaty with that Power. I could not but reflect upon the different feelings which must actuate your Mind, and the writer of the following paragraph, written last october, upon seeing Some...
Thus far am I on my journey. I hope to reach East Chester on thursday Evening, and one day I must pass there, and one in N york. on Monday I shall sit forward for Philadelphia, and could wish you to meet me at muckleroys to dinner on twesday, if agreable to you, of which you can inform me by post addrest to me at N york to be left at our Sons. Brisler will be home by Saturday Night or sunday...
I Received yours of the 16th on wedensday, and participated in the Joy and pleasure you must have experienced in meeting a dear and amiable son after a four years Seperation. how happy should I have been to have folded him at the same time to my Bosom, and felt a pleasure which the Childless, can never experience. I have already written both [. . .] you, and to him, respecting his comeing to...
I have been informd to day, that a paper from N york the daily advertizer was received in Town on saturday night, which states that the Senate have refused to concur in the nomination of mr Murrey, and congratulating the public upon it, that the Senate have offerd their Reasons, which are promised in the next Paper; We are told that [“]in a multitude of Counsellors their is safety” I cannot...
Thus has my son given me a legal right to address you. I feel also, that I have an affectionate right devolved to me from him, to stile you thus. it would have given me great pleasure to have embraced you as Such in America, but as it has been otherways ordered, I must submit to that destiny which has through the greater part of my Life seperated me from my dearest connections. I feel a tender...
If I have not written to you my dear Neice it is not because I have not frequently thought of you, through the winter. your good Mother has often informd me of your Welfare and that your little Girl was well. I have sent by mr Black a little token of my Remembrance to her, not because I thought you had not pretty things in Boston, but merely that she might have a slip of my giving her, if she...
I inclose you the Letter which gave me every reason to expect that Thomas was on Board Capt Jenkins. as he is not mentiond, and I have not heard any thing, I am fearfull he did not come. perhaps capt Jenkins may know in what vessel he took his passage it is very painfull to be daily expecting a Friend, at this Season of the year. one cannot help having much anxiety The conduct of Dr W h is...
I should sooner have acknowledgd your obliging favour & replied to your inquiries if I could have obtaind any thing upon the subject which would have been usefull to you The President desires me to tell you that he does not possess any minutes or details of the debate or speech upon the occasion you allude to. Dr Ramsey must have his from some lose memmorandan or other. with respect to the...
If you have once more set your foot upon American ground, and are in safety, God be praised I have sufferd great anxiety for you, knowing your intention of comeing this winter. you may well suppose my Heart Leaped for Joy when I found that Captain Jenkins was safely arrived. I for three days, was expecting to see you, but upon writing to mr smith for intelligence I could not get any concerning...
we reachd here yesterday being thursday the 7 th day from leaving home. we had very bad Roads, the Rains having washd all the stones bare, and the ruts were very deep I was much fatigued; Brisler and Family went on to N york mrs Brisler much mended in her Health by her journey. I hope when we get over our fatigue we shall all be able to say so. Betsy does not seem the worse for it, tho I think...
I write you a few lines this morning merely to inclose a Letter which I will thank you to cover and forward to Atkinson. I have not time to write this morning to Atkinson. inclosed I sent you a specimin of the Manners Religion & politeness of one of the 44 Gentlemen, Who can come and Eat of my Bread, & drink of my Wine one whom the Virginians consider as a Paragon of politeness whom they have...
I am indebted to you for a very kind and friendly Letter by my son, to which I ought sooner to have replied, but I have been a poor correspondent for the last nine Months, through loss of sleep. My Head for more than half the time has felt in such a state of Langour and weakness that I have not been able either to write or read with comfort or satisfaction you who was witness to my situation...
The proclamation of the 25 of March, which is published in the Centinal of April 1 st has excited many anxious thoughts in my Mind. What would I give for an hours conversation it would tend to alleviate my apprehensions. I feel as if I could fly in all our many seperations. I have experienced a variety of anxieties. I thought there could be nothing New to feel, but there is now such a...
I received your Letter of Nov br 24 by the post of yesterday. with respect to the Notes you wrote me about I wish you to do by them as you would by your own, as I do not want at present neither Principle or interest. I think it would be most for my interest to do by them as you propose. the method you mention of adding to the out house so as to give me a dairy Room I like very much, and would...
we arrived here on twesday Evening on the 11 th , after a pleasent journey in which we met with but few obstructions the Weather on one Day prevented our travelling, and we tarried on sunday at Hartford, and on Monday morning were escorted out of Town by a Troop of light Horse, and the citizens in carriages and on Horse back as far as Weathersfield. we proceed then for New Haven about 40 miles...
when this reaches you I presume you will have arivd to the end of your journey, and have taken possession of your office, where I trust you will be usefull—and I hope happy— I find the publick offices are removed, from Trentown. I judge your uncle will proceed immediatly to Philadelphia. I have not had a line from mr Brisler for more than a month. I hope if he and his Family are safe returnd,...
we left Philadelphia on Wedensday last. the day preceeding was very Hot a partial Rain had waterd the Roads for 15 or 20 miles So as to render the first part of our journey pleasent. we were overtaken by showers—and detaind by them, but on thursday we found clouds of dust for want of Rain. troops and calvacades did not lessen it, and the Heat was intolerably oppressive, so much so as to nearly...
This is our Thanksgiving day. when I look Back upon the year past, I perceive many, very many causes for thanksgiving, both of a publick and Private nature. I hope my Heart is not ungratefull, tho sad; it is usually a day of festivity when the social Family circle meet together tho seperated the rest of the year. No Husband dignifies my Board , no Children add gladness to it, no Smiling...
Tho I have not heard from you since I wrote you last, and have nothing new to say, unless it be a resital of my own perplexities, out of which I must get by myself. Yet a few lines will assure you that I am getting forward as fast as possible with my affairs, and prepairing to sit out on my journey. the weather has been as uncommonly cold and stormy for the week past, as it was Hot for two...
I think through all the most trying conflicts of my life, I have been called to pass through them separated from the personal condolence and support of my bosom friend, I have been taught to look for support and aid from superior power than man: there is a state of mind, when affliction dries up the source of tears, and almost bids the swollen heart burst. I have left one of those distressing...
The weather is Hot as we can bear the whole city is like a Bake House. we have a House with large and airy Rooms, or I could not sustain it I do bear it surprizingly well however, tho I long for a sea Breaze. I hope to leave here on monday and get on to Bristol 18 miles the first night. I shall want Several things put in order at home for our reception when I once get on my journey. I shall...
We are thus far on our Way to N England if no accident happens to prevent us. I hope on thursday of next week to sleep at williams at Malbourough, and to dine at Watertown on fryday. We escaped from N york with less parade than was intended, tho we were not less sensible to the politeness and civility of the inhabitants who were disposed to do us every honour both civil and Military. the first...
A private opportunity offering by way of Hamburgh to write to you, I eagerly embrace it, and hope it may reach you safely notwithstanding the various Chances it may run. your arrival at Berlin was made known to us from your Letters to the secretary of state of Nov’ br the 10th and 17 th . no private Letter has yet been received, nor the publick Letter which you mention having written from...
I received your Letter of Jan’ry 23 d and was gratified to find your Hand writing improving. I know you are attentive to what is passing in the political World, indeed who can be an indifferent Spectator, in Times so critical, so allarming and so big with Concequences as the present? I send you a late publication under the signature of scipio, [ “ ]Reflections on Monroe’s view of the conduct...