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Results 27701-27750 of 32,116 sorted by author
27701[Diary entry: 9 May 1797] (Washington Papers)
9. Disagreeably cool—tho’ the Wind was shifting to the Southward.
Soon after the Appraisment of the Decd Colo. Custis’s Estate it seemed to be a matter of doubt whether Davy (a boy) who was appraised among his Negroes belonged to him, or Mr Dandridge your Father. Your Bro: then having, as I have understood, the Administration of his Affairs, conceived him to be the property of the latter and offered the boy to Mrs Washington at the Appraisment price, which...
I find myself so happy, as to be honoured with a Letter from your patriotic Society of the City of Enkhuysen accompanied with one from the Baron De Capellan de Pol, that worthy Patriot and warm friend of the Liberties of mankind in general and in particular of your and our republican States, whose name has been long known an d revered in this Country. With these Letters came the Six Kegs of...
I this morning received your Letter of Yesterday and was much concerned to find that you had declined advancing to join this Army or to act in this Quarter. Your aid I deem of great importance, and if you are not too far beyond Brunswic when this reaches you, I must request that you will immediately face about and proceed as expeditiously as you can with the Troops under you, to Spotswood,...
Honored Madam—Your letter by Mr. Smith I received on my way to Col Fairfax’s funeral; in answer to that part relative to my Bro’r Charles’ Marriage I shall observe, that if there is no other objection than the one you mention, it may soon be removed; and that Mrs Thornton if she believes I am capable of taking these ungenrous advantages, knows little of the principles which govern my...
27706[Diary entry: 24 August 1787] (Washington Papers)
Friday 24th. Did the same this day.
[ Peekskill, New York ] August 5, 1780 . Regrets that the Chevalier de Ternay is adverse to entering New York harbor. Entreats Lafayette to “ascertain the probability of a succour coming from France and the West Indies.” Df , in writings of James McHenry and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The Gentleman who will have the honor of delivering this letter to you; is Doctr Tate, who is possessed of the valuable secret of curing Cancerous complaints. A call to England for some purpose of that sort—or with a view to derive benefit from his discovery, affords me an occasion to inform you (at his request) that I have, myself, experienced the fruits of his skill, in this art; being cured...
I am just honored with your letter of the 10th—Mine of this morning which will probably reach you before this, will inform you that on hearing of the enemy’s movement from below, I had detached a body of troops under Major General Heath to counteract them. It gives me pain that I have it not in my power to afford more effectual succour to the country; but the smallness of our force obliges me...
On the 24th instant a New-York paper announced the arrival of a 74 Ship—(one of Admiral Arbuthnot’s) and that the whole fleet were about 30 leagues Eastward. Our advices since confirm their arrival in the Hook on the 25th. I have not yet learned what regiments, it has brought, or the general amount of the reinforcement. I have been favored with your account to Col. Hay. I wish for a...
27711[Diary entry: 14 July 1768] (Washington Papers)
14. Attended in the Neck Again.
You are to take under your command all the men now quartered in this town; and proceed with the utmost dispatch to Watkins’s Ferry; there to relieve Lieutenant Lomax and his party, who are to march directly to Fort-Cumberland, to join their respective Companies there. Lieutenant Lomax will give you a copy of his Instructions; by which you are to govern yourself. If Captain Stewart is still at...
The round of business and of ceremony, which now engages my attention, only allows me leisure to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th. of last month, which will receive a more particular consideration.—I am, with great esteem, Sir, Your most obedient Servant, RC ( DLC ); in hand of William Jackson except for signature; endorsed by TJ as received at Albany 25 May 1791 and so...
Your private letter of the 3d instant, accompanying the official one of the same date, came to hand by the last Post. The draught of the letter to the Governor of Georgia is approved. I have added a word or two to the last paragraph but one—by way of hint , where we shall look for the cause, if Peace is not preserved on the frontier of that State. I request that you would begin to note the...
I cannot charge my memory with all the particulars which have passed between us, relative to the disposition of the money borrowed. Your letters, however, and my answer; which you refer to in the foregoing statement, and have lately reminded me of, speak for themselves, and stand in need of no explanation. As to verbal communications, I am satisfied, that many were made by you to me on this...
my lame horse; and for the lent of the one which Austin rid up. Mr Hunter (of Alexandria) is so obliging as to take him down, to you, and will bring mine up, if he is fit to move. if not, I will wait until you may write me, as I had rather send for him than have him travelled as quick as he must do to accompany the Stage. Mrs Washington and the family here join me in every good wish for...
I have your favor of the 7th—Altho there may be an impropriety in employing a compa. of the German prisoners in the Garrison of Westpoint as Armourers yet I think it may safely be done at Newburgh, where a Buildg may be appropriated for a Work Shop—It seems our only expedient, and I have little Doubt, but if these people were promised their Liberty, upon workg faithfully Twelve Months, or some...
27718General Orders, 25 June 1776 (Washington Papers)
The Militia Officers of the adjoining provinces who are to reinforce this army, are upon their arrival with their troops, to make report immediately, to the Brigadier General, or the officer commanding their respective Corps, who is to make report once in two days to the Commander in Chief. The Adjutant General’s Office will be removed this afternoon to a small brick house, one of the offices...
27719[Diary entry: 15 December 1789] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 15th. Exercised on horseback about 10 Oclock. Called on the Secretary for the Department of War and gave him the heads of many Letters to be written to characters in the Western Country relative, chiefly, to Indian Affairs. Visitors at the Levee today were not very numerous, though respectable.
27720[Diary entry: 22 October 1774] (Washington Papers)
22. Dined at Mr. Griffins & drank Tea with Mrs. Roberdeau. Mary Bostwick Roberdeau (d. 1777), daughter of Rev. David Bostwick of New York, was the wife of Daniel Roberdeau, a Philadelphia merchant and Patriot.
27721[Diary entry: 5 March 1767] (Washington Papers)
5. Clear, warm & pleast. forenoon. Wind southwardly. Afterwards hazy & lowerg.
I received yours of yesterday, late last night. I am pleased to find that the Vigilance of your Guards and patrolls disappointed the enemy whatever might have been their intentions. I have taken precautions to guard against an attempt by such a party as might be reasonably supposed to be able to reach this in the course of a night, and I hope that a short continuance of this Weather will make...
New Windsor [ New York ] June 30, 1779 . Asks Gates to send Brigadier General John Glover’s brigade to join the Army. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have been honored with your Letter of this date see 22 Oct. inclosing one from Colo. Febiger to you—The representation you have given me of the state of the officers makes me Feel very sensibly for them, and I could wish the means in my power, for their relief, were equal to my inclinations, but as I am divested of them, I can do no more than recommend them, with others, to Congress & their...
The Marqs de la Fayette did me the honor of presenting to me your favor of the 16th of June; & of entering into some explanation of the Powers of Magnetism—the discovery of which, if it should prove as extensively beneficial as it is said, must be fortunate indeed for Mankind, & redound very highly to the honor of that genius to whom it owes its birth. For the confidence reposed in me by the...
27726[Diary entry: 2 July 1767] (Washington Papers)
2. Do. Do. Do.
The P—— requests that Mr. J—— would give the enclosed letter and papers a reading between this and dinner—and come an hour before it, that he may have an opportunity of conversing with him on the subject of them. Mr. Walker of George Town is in this City—from him; if Mr. J—— could contrive to get him to his house, he might learn the sentiments of the people of that place, Carrolsburg &ca.—with...
27728[Diary entry: 13 January 1773] (Washington Papers)
13. Lowering Morning & very like for Snow—ground hard froze. Afterwards clear. Wind South.
I was duly honored with your Excellency’s letter of the 12th and shall properly attend to its important contents. I hope the measures I had previously taken relative to the exchange of prisoners, announced in my letter of the 7th will not be disagreeable to Congress; they were founded on an opinion I had constantly entertained that it was our interest to extend the exchange of officers as far...
27730[Diary entry: 20 December 1797] (Washington Papers)
20. Wind Southerly in the Morng. with appearances of Snow No. Wt. in the afternn. & Cold Mer. 28 a 38. Doctr. Stuart came to Dinn.
From Mr Harrison you would know my Intention of offering you one of the 16 Regimts which the Congress have been pleas’d to leave to me to raise, & appoint the Officers of[.] I have express’d my desire that Colo. Levin Powell should be your Lieut. Colo., & if you have no objection, & Frazers Stomach comes to him it will be agreeable to me that he becomes your Major as he is spoke very well of...
In the respectful address of the Burgesses and common council of the Borough of Wilmington, I recognise the friendly dispositions towards myself, and the patriotic sentiments for the Community at large which have always distinguished the Citizens of Delaware. When on a former occasion you intimated to me your expectation, that, if any event should again render my services necessary, I would...
27733[Diary entry: 10 May 1773] (Washington Papers)
10th. Clear and Warm all the day. Wind at So. East.
Upon the receipt of your Letter respecting Mrs Jauncey I did myself the pleasure of waiting upon that Lady; and beg you to be persuaded, that I shall be happy on occasions of rendering her any advice which may be in my power. I am confident, Sir, it must give you great satisfaction to be informed that the most perfect regularity and good order prevail in this City, and that every description...
27735[Diary entry: 14 January 1760] (Washington Papers)
14. Wind Do. but not hard—yet very cold & frosty.
27736[Diary entry: 22 March 1748] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 22d. Continued Rain and the Freshes kept us at Cresaps.
In answer to your Letter of the 18th I am to inform you, that the Resolution of Congress by which offenders of the description of those whom you have sent here, were subject to Trial by Court Martial, is expired —and that even while it remained in force it was not so extensive as to include all the cases which you mention—the Crimes of the two prisoners sent, being intirely of civil...
If Mr. Madison is at leizure the P. would be glad to see him. RC ( NjP ); Tr ( MH : Sparks Transcripts). RC addressed by Washington.
The intercourse between the inhabitants of the States and the Citizens of New York, by means of the Flag Boats which pass from the latter to Elizabeth Town, has become so very frequent that it excites suspicions and jealousies in the minds of many of the well affected among us, and puts it much in the power of the Enemy to gain intelligence, and to propagate injurious reports, thro’ the...
Herewith I lay before you, a letter from the Attorney General of the United States relative to compensation to the Attornies of the United States in the several districts; which is recommended to your consideration. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
27741[Diary entry: 14 September 1787] (Washington Papers)
Friday 14th. Attended Convention. Dined at the City Tavern, at an entertainmt. given on my acct. by the City light Horse. Spent the evening at Mr. Meridiths.
27742[Diary entry: 28 August 1773] (Washington Papers)
28. Mr. Tilghman went away after Breakfast & Mr. Digges & his Sisters in the Afternoon.
I have been favored with your Letter of this date. It is my opinion that Major Porter be bro’t to a Court Martial immediately, as I have no idea of an officer being absent, in the manner he has, without being made a public example of. Whatever Shoes are wanted for the use of the Men, over the number assigned them, may be drawn for & charged to their respective Accounts. I am much obliged by...
However desireous I am to encourage or promote useful publications, it is not in my power to comply with the request made in your letter of the 21st ulto—to select from my papers such documents of interesting circumstances, skirmishes & battles of the Revolution, as would enable you to prosecute the design which you have begun of publishing in the American Museum a series of documents and...
27745[Diary entry: 25 December 1773] (Washington Papers)
25. At home all day. After breakfast the Doctr. went off homewards.
27746[Diary entry: 29 January 1796] (Washington Papers)
29. Clear & turned much colder. Mercury at 18. Wind at No. Wt.
27747[Diary entry: 20 July 1770] (Washington Papers)
20. Compleated my Wheat Harvest altogether & exceeding bad I am apprehensive it will turn out—owing I am of opinion to the frequent Rains in the Month of June. The Heads containd but few grains—the Grain but little flower being for the most part perishd and Milldewed. The frequent Rains had by beating down the straw been the occasion of much loss in the Field both by shattering and unclean...
27748[Diary entry: 22 March 1763] (Washington Papers)
22. Transplanted to the Corner of the Borders by Garden House a Cherry Graft—from the Cherry tree at the other Corner of the said Bord⟨er⟩ by the first Fall.
Middlebrook Camp [ New Jersey ] June 2, 1777. Encloses news from Northern Department. Deplores deficiency of troops. States that Colonel Elias Boudinot is going to Philadelphia to discuss exchange of prisoners. Df , in writing of H; last line and postscript in writing of Robert Hanson Harrison, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Boudinot was commissary general for prisoners,...
I have received from the Governor of Vermont authentic documents expressing the consent of the Legislatures of New York and of the Territory of Vermont, that the said territory shall be admitted to be a distinct member of our union; and a Memorial of Nathaniel Chipman and Lewis R. Morris Commissioners from the said Territory, praying the consent of Congress to that admission by the name and...