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Results 4651-4700 of 32,396 sorted by author
Yesterday a Deputation from the Provincial Congress of New Hampshire attended me with a Request that three Companies raised in that province, and now posted on Connecticut River at and between the two Cohhess commanded by Capts. Timothy Reedle, James Osgood & John Parker might be continued for the Security of the Frontiers of that Province on the Continental Establishment. As it did not appear...
Letter not found: to John Hyde, 20 Dec. 1793. In a letter to GW of 23 Dec. , Hyde mentioned receiving “your Letter of the 20.”
4653[Diary entry: 17 March 1786] (Washington Papers)
Friday 17th. Thermometer at 49 in the morning—52 at Noon and 48 at Night. Cloudy all day, and sometimes dripping rain—Wind at No. West but not fresh nor cold. Finished landing Corn—viz. 1000 Bushels which had swelled 13 bushels over. Had every species of stock turned off my Muddy hole Wheat field except two English Colts and with young.
The President sends to the Secretary of State two letters which he has received from Baltimore, written by persons from St. Domingo. The President has no knowledge of the writer of the letter in English; but he wishes the Secretary of State to consider it, and if he thinks the circumstances therein mentioned deserve attention, the Secretary will communicate to the President such answer thereto...
I have received your two letters of the 9th and 13th. On the same principle upon which that of the 9th is founded, it has been my endeavour to conduct the correspondence between us on the terms which politeness and the nature of the intercourse demanded. In the affair to which you allude, I persuade myself all the attentions were observed, which the peculiarity of the circumstances would...
Your letters of the 31st Ulto and 3d Instant came to hand by the same Mail, on tuesday last. The Duplicate of the Powers to Messrs Willink’s, have been handed over, for the purpose of transmission. Triplicates, signed by a full board may not be amiss. I am very glad to hear that you have re-commenced your operations on the public buildings: exceedingly is it to be wished. that you may be able...
I have received your favour of yesterday, and am obliged to you for the intelligence, it contains. I beg you will continue your endeavours to procure every information, you can, concerning the enemy’s situation and designs, as well with respect to their naval as to their land force, which, at this time, is peculiarly important. For this purpose, I send you a number of questions, which you will...
I have been honourd with your favour of the 16th, and the several Inclosures contained therein, which are now return’d with my thanks for the oppertunity of perusing them —I also Inclose you a Letter from Lord Howe, sent out (with others) by a Flag in the Afternoon of yesterday. with it comes a Letter for Lieutt Barrington, who if not among those who broke their Parole, & went of for Canada,...
Inclosd you will receive a Bill (promisd in my last of the 7th May) which please to receive and place to my Credit —Since mine of the above date your agreable favour of the 26th March covering Invoice of Sundries pr the desire is come to hand as has the Goods also in good Order which is more than most of the Importers by that Ship can boast great part of her Cargoe being damagd—thrô the...
4660[Diary entry: 3 August 1797] (Washington Papers)
3. Raining more or less from 10 Oclock—M. 77.
On Monday Evening I had the honor to receive Your Excellency’s Letter of the 10th, with the Inclosures to which it refers, by Major Clarkson. I also had the honor since, on the night of the 17th, to receive Your Favor of the 11th. I regret much the failure of the expedition against Savannah, and the causes which seem to have produced it. The North Carolina Troops proceeded yesterday to New...
An officer of Genl Glovers Brigade arrived here yesterday and informs me that he left twelve Waggons load of Cloathing at that place, which he had under his Charge from Boston with directions to bring it on to this Army. He alledges in excuse for leaving it, that the Waggons would not come any further, but it does not appear that he took any pains to procure others. The Army being in the...
4663[Diary entry: 25 March 1788] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 25th. Thermometer at 36 in the morng.—46 at Noon and 44 at Night. Morning clear, ground hard frozen, Wind from So. Wt. in the Morning early. Afterwards it veered to West, blew fresh & cold. In the evening it got to So. Wt. again and became moderate. Visited all the Plantations. The ground at all was too hard frozen and when thawed too wet to sow and harrow till afternoon. Mr. Benja....
I have recd your favr of the 14th I am in hopes you will execute the whole of your Business without being under the necessity of making a collection by military force. You may make up any deficiency in Flour by Indian Corn or Meal. I am Sir Your most obt Servt LS , in Tench Tilghman’s writing, TxHU . GW signed the cover. The letter is addressed to Shreve in Burlington County, New Jersey.
4665[Diary entry: 17 March 1770] (Washington Papers)
17. Rid with Mr. West to Mr. Triplets to settle the Lines of Harrisons Patent. Passd by the Mill with Colo. Lewis. Mr. Whiting went home this Mor⟨n⟩ing & Mr. West in the Afternn. from T[riplet]s. Harrison’s patent, a grant of 266 acres made to William Harrison 4 Dec. 1706, lay northwest of Dogue Run between the lands that GW had bought from Pearson and the Ashfords in 1761–62 and Trenn’s land,...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favour of the 20th and 22d instants. I am exceedingly sorry to find you express a doubt of being able immediately to procure the number of 250 Waggons in the State of Pennsylvania—if we should be disappointed in that quarter, I know not where we are to apply. The Quarter Master General has, as you observe, a considerable number of Waggons laying idle...
Letter not found: to Col. Henry Emanuel Lutterloh, 11 Mar. 1778. Lutterloh wrote GW c.16 Mar ., “I had allso the honour to receive Your Excellencys Letter of the 11 instt,” and Lutterloh’s letter to GW of 10 Mar. is docketed, “Answd 11th Mar.”
A few days since I was honored with your favour of the 8th instant. It is my constant endeavour to cultivate the confidence of the governments of the several states by an equal and uniform attention to their respective interests, so far as falls within the line of my duty and the compass of the means with which I am intrusted. With a consciousness of this, it is natural that my sensibility...
I was just now honored with your Letter of the 25th inst. The evacuation of Ticonderoga and Mount Independence is an event so interesting and so unexpected that I do not wonder it should produce in the minds of the people—at least—the well attached—the effects you mention—I am fully in sentiment with you, that the cause leading to this unhappy measure should be fully and minutely...
[ Pawlins Mill, Pennsylvania ] October 8, 1777 . Instructs Armstrong to send Brigadier General James Potter and six hundred men to intercept British communications between Philadelphia and Chester. Expects to be informed of Potter’s actions. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Armstrong was a major general, Pennsylvania Militia.
4671Executive Order, 15 March 1791 (Washington Papers)
Arrangement made by the President of the United States, with respect to the subdivisions of the several Districts thereof into Surveys, the appointment of Officers, and the assignment of compensations, pursuant to the Act of Congress passed the 3d day of March 1791, entitled “An Act repealing after the last day of June next, the duties heretofore laid upon distilled Spirits imported from...
4672[Diary entry: 22 November 1788] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 22d. Thermometer at 50 in the Morning 66 at Noon and 66 at Night. A very thick fog in the Morning—but clear, calm & remarkably pleasant afterwards. Docter Lee going away after breakfast I rid to all the Plantations. In the Neck—Seven plows began to break up that part of field No. 8 wch. is directly opposite to Mr. [Abednego] Adams’s on the point. The other hands having finished...
You will proceed with the detachment under your command to Dunks’s ferry on Delaware, if you find in your progress the way clear & safe. When arrived there, you will take the safest & most expeditious method of conducting the detachment to fort Mifflin; by water would be easiest & least fatiguing to your men; and if practicable & safe, will certainly be most eligible: otherwise you will cross...
I am informed that there is a quantity of Arms and Accoutrements proper for Cavalry in the Magazines at Springfield under your care. You will be pleased to deliver to the Order of Colonels Moylan and Sheldon or the commanding Officers of their Regiments, such of the above Articles as they may call for. I am, &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
4675[Diary entry: 17 May 1770] (Washington Papers)
17. 10 hands at work to day. The H⟨oist⟩ frame & Mill beam were put up to day. Began also to raise Scaffolds for the Masons this day.
A voluminous publication is daily expected from Mr. R——. The paper alluded to in the extract of his letter to me, of the 8th. instt. and inserted in all the Gazettes, is a letter of my own, to him; from which he intends (as far as I can collect from a combination of circumstances) to prove an inconsistency in my conduct, in ratifying the Treaty with G. Britain, without making a rescinding (by...
4677[Diary entry: 26 May 1780] (Washington Papers)
26th. Wind fresh from the Westwd. Very warm—dusty & dry—Also hazy with appearances of Rain but none fell.
4678[Diary entry: 23 January 1772] (Washington Papers)
23. Soft Morning and a White frost. Weather exceeding pleasant as it continued to be through the day without Wind & clear Sky.
4679[Diary entry: 12 August 1770] (Washington Papers)
12. Warm and still with Clouds.
4680General Orders, 4 August 1778 (Washington Papers)
The sixth Virginia Regiment being ordered to join the Tenth in the Arrangement of the Brigades was a Mistake—it is to continue with the second as usual. All Officers commanding Regiments having men who from their state of health will not be fit for active service in a short time are desired to make a return of them to the Orderly-Office that those proper for the Purpose may be draughted to...
I have been honored with your favr of the 7th Inst. upon the Subject of Tents for this Army. That you might receive proper Information of the Number wanted, I directed the Quarter Master General to return you an Estimate, whose Office it is to provide them. His Report you will find in the inclosed Letter which I beg leave to refer you, and requesting that the greatest Dispatch may be used in...
4682[Diary entry: 20 May 1772] (Washington Papers)
20. Colo. Blackburn & the Compa. with him went away after Breakfast. I sat to have my Picture drawn. On 21 May, GW wrote to Jonathan Boucher : “Inclinations having yielded to Importunity, I am now contrary to all expectations under the hands of Mr. Peale; but in so grave—so sullen a mood—and now and then under the influence of Morpheus, when some critical strokes are making, that I fancy the...
4683General Orders, 16 December 1779 (Washington Papers)
Varick transcript , DLC:GW . Adj. Gen. Alexander Scammell’s orderly book entry for this date includes a general order: “A Corporal & six Men from the Maryland Line to be sent to the Forage Master Generals this afternoon with their Blankets & two Days provision—They are to drive a Number of horses to Lancaster in Pennsylvania” (orderly book, 17 Oct. 1779–22 March 1780, DNA : RG 93, Orderly...
(Private) My dear Sir Phila. Octobr 18th 1792. I did not require the evidence of the extracts which you enclosed me, to convince me of your attachment to the Constitution of the United States, or of your disposition to promote the general Welfare of this Country. But I regret—deeply regret—the difference in opinions which have arisen, and divided you and another principal Officer of the...
I have received your letter by your Captain with your kind Tenders of a Months Service if needed—In Answer I inform you that the Circumstances of the Campaign are such, that at present I have no Ocassion for your Aid—but should Genl Heath find Need of your Assistance, I will be glad you will do him the like Service as you have offered to me, if he shall write to you for that Purpose. In Answer...
In a letter which I wrote to Congress a few days ago, I took the liberty to recommend uniting the remains of the late Count Pulaski’s legion—Colo. Armands Corps—and a small troop of Horse under the command of Capt. Bedkin. The whole to be under the command of Colo. Armand. Should Congress determine upon the measure—Colo. Armand wishes the Resolve, for the incorporation of the Corps, should be...
You will herewith receive Dispatches for His Excellency the Count de Rochambeau and the Chevalier de Ternay, or such other Admiral as may command the Fleet expected from France. Their contents are of the most important and interesting nature; and I have to request the favor of you to send them on board the fleet as soon as possible, after they arrive on the Monmouth Coast, or off the Hook, by...
I have received Your favor of the 12th Instant. I was exceedingly sorry for Major Taylor’s resignation—and used my interest to dissuade him from it, as I deemed him a valuable Officer—capable of rendering his Count⟨ry⟩ good Service. But The Major having resigned, I do not see how he can be reintroduced, more especially after so long an absence. Attempts of this sort when they have succeeded,...
4689[Diary entry: 9 May 1796] (Washington Papers)
9. Cloudy with appearances of Rain—some of which fell in the night. Wind Easterly.
4690[Diary entry: 6 January 1790] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 6th. Sat from half after 8 oclock till 10 for the Portrait Painter, Mr. Savage, to finish the Picture of me which he had begun for the University of Cambridge. In the Afternoon walked round the Battery. Miss Anne Brown stayed here on a visit to Mrs. Washington to a family dinner. mr. savage : See entry for 21 Dec. 1789 .
4691General Orders, 17 February 1777 (Washington Papers)
Varick transcript , DLC:GW .
4692General Orders, 14 April 1779 (Washington Papers)
At a Brigade General Court Martial held at Elizabeth-Town the 10th instant, Lieutenant Colonel Brearly President. Lieutenant Snowden of the Jersey Brigade was tried for “Disobedience of orders and neglect of duty on the 4th instant.” The Court after mature consideration are of opinion that from the General’s expressions mentioned in Captn Van Voorhees testimony Lieutenant Snowden had reason to...
Your Lordships favour of the 31st of October never came to my hands till a few days ago & then unaccompanied with any Printed Lists of the fortunate Prizes as mentiond in yr Letter. some time ago I came across one of these Lists in a Gentns possession by wch I found that out of the Six Tickets wch I kept on my own Acct two of them were fortunate—viz. One of £200—No. 58 in the division of...
I have been hond with your Excelly two Favors of the 15th of March & 11th of April. I am happy to Observe the good Disposition of the State over which you preside—their Exertions seem to me in proportion to the Distresses in which they have been involved—The Act for Recruitg your Line I hope may be attended with happy Consequences. Our Affairs at this moment are placed in a most critical...
4695General Orders, 18 February 1779 (Washington Papers)
Lieutenant Colin Coke is appointed Pay-Master of the 2nd Virginia regiment, vice Lieutt Erasmus Gill from the 16th instant. Varick transcript , DLC:GW . Adj. Gen. Alexander Scammell’s orderly book entry for this date closes with the following additional general order: “The Court Martial whereof Colo. Hall is President will sit Tomorrrow 10 oClock A.M. at the usual place, for the Trial of...
I have yours of the 14th Instant. When I wrote to Genl Varnum expressing my surprise that my Orders for innoculation had not been sooner carried into execution, I was not acquainted with the Circumstances that necessarily retarded it. I do not apprehend that there is any immediate danger from the Enemy at Newport, their sending away their Vessels is a plain indication that they mean either to...
I have been favoured with your letter of the 25th of November by Major Farlie. Sincerely do I wish that the several State Societies had, or would; adopt the alterations that were recommended by the General meeting in May 1784. I then thought, and have had no cause since to change my opinion, that if the Society of the Cincinnati mean to live in peace with the rest of their fellow Citizens,...
A Plan of the number of Forts, and strength necessary to each, extending entirely across our Frontiers, from South to north. Names of the forts, or persons Commandg in ’em. On what waters placed Distance from each other in miles No. of men Garrisoning each Capt. Harris Mayo 20 Galloway Smith’s-river 15 miles 20 Terry
The State of our Magazines makes it necessary to discharge every Mouth that can be dispensed with, as early as possible, and as I think the season is so far advanced that the greatest part of the Levies may be immediately dismissed without danger from the decrease of our numbers, you will, as soon as you reach the Ground allotted for your Winter Cantonment, begin to discharge those of the...
4700[Diary entry: 27 December 1770] (Washington Papers)
27. Frosty Morning but clear and pleasant afterwards.