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    • Washington, George
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    • Maxwell, William
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Maxwell, William" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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In addition to the questions which I have already proposed for the consideration of the General Officers —I have farther asked whether judging from the present state and appearance of affairs, it would be advisable to detach any part of our force to Boston—& shd it be decided in the affirmative—what force would it be proper to detach—Your Lordship will be so good as to add your opinion on...
Middlebrook , [ New Jersey ] February 16, 1779 . Agrees that John Adam, deputy commissary of prisoners, should live at Elizabethtown. Refuses Maxwell’s request to be present at Pluckamin on February 18. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] December 13, 1779 . Instructs Maxwell to march to Camp when Brigadier General Samuel Holden Parsons reaches the Sound. Informs Maxwell that part of the clothing for his men is at Headquarters. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Wilmington [ Delaware ] September 3, 1777. Discusses possibility of British attack on Maxwell by enemy party sent to Bohemia, Delaware. Orders Maxwell to send information about enemy in that area. In postscript, orders Maxwell to retreat to Christiana Bridge. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
A few hours after the receipt of your letter of the 20th I found an opportunity of transmitting a Copy of it to Congress—This being the case I can have no objection to your going to Philada as you request—I am &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Wilmington [ Delaware ] September 5, 1777. Encloses two letters for Lord Richard Howe and General William Howe. Orders Maxwell to apologize to Howe if there is any truth in report that an enemy flag was fired upon. Requests information concerning situation of enemy. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
From some information I have received this morning_ I think it necessary that Your Brigade should advance, which I directed to halt by a line last night. You will therefore march on with it ’till you join the Army, unless you should receive order’s to the contrary. I am, Dr Sir, Yr Most Obedt St DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 7, 1779 . Asks Maxwell to convey Washington’s views on the remonstrance of the New Jersey officers to the men involved. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
You are to accompany Colo. Jimat to the County of Monmouth and to such parts of the Coast as he may find occasion to visit. You are, I imagine, well apprized of the disaffection of many of the inhabitants in that Quarter and of the necessity which there will be of guarding against any attempts of theirs to take you off. It may perhaps add to your security, if you can prevail upon some of the...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 10, 1779 . Regrets that New Jersey officers persist in their complaint about soldiers’ pay. States that “All that the common soldiery of any country can expect is food and cloathing.” Df , in writings of Richard Kidder Meade and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Valley Forge, May 25, 1778 . Orders Maxwell to secure all available information concerning enemy and to remain in readiness to march. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. William Maxwell, 16 Feb. 1777. On 17 Feb. Maxwell wrote GW informing him that “your Excellency Favours of the 16th I have Recd.”
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. William Maxwell, 1 Jan. 1777. Robert Hanson Harrison docketed Maxwell’s letter to GW of 29 Dec. : “Ansd 1 Jany 1777.”
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. William Maxwell, 27 Jan. 1777. Maxwell wrote to GW on 9 Feb. to “explain some querys I find in Your Excellency’s Letter of the 27th Jany.”
Wilmington [ Delaware ] September 5, 1777. Asks if Maxwell is prepared to make a secret foray against enemy. Gives instructions concerning proper guides and return route. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Letter not found : to William Maxwell, 15 April 1779. On 17 April , Maxwell acknowledged receipt of GW’s letters to him of 14 and 15 April.
[ Middlebrook, New Jersey ] February 15, 1779 . States that British are about to move on Staten Island. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Your favors of the 8th and 11th instant, with the several news-papers came duly to hand. I have no objection to Mr Wolfen continuing in his present duty. However, it may be necessary to have the men relieved by a fresh party, that the fatigue may be equally borne by the whole corps, that is in case of its being severe. I have the same idea of the impropriety of such inlistments as you have...
Mr Crowels recent violation of the usages and laws of flags render it necessary to adopt some measures, that may prevent similar procedings in future. For this purpose you will immediately fix upon a certain number of places for the reception of flag-boats, and advise the commanding Officer on Staten Island, of the places, and that no flag boats will be received any where else without a...
I received your favor of the 17th Inst. yesterday evening. No certain conclusions can be drawn of the enemy’s designs on the Jersey from the fitting up of their flat bottomed boats. If part of them are going to the West Indies they will want them there. It will not therefore be altogether advisable on the present appearance of things to call out the militia—But in order to guard against the...
I was favored with your letter of yesterdays date this evening. I have informed Governor Livingston with as many of the circumstances of Hatfields case as have come within my knowlege, and directed Lord Stirling to furnish him with such as he has relating to this subject. You will be pleased without further delay to deliver both Hatfield and the vessel he was in, to the civil magistrate with...
I was favored with the receipt of your letter of the 17th int. If you have any knowledge of the country which lays between Niagara and our settlements I shall be obliged by your deliniating with as much exactness as you are able the different Indian villiages—the best routes which lead to them—their names—the nature of the country whether hilly or swampy—the waters—and such obstruction⟨s⟩ as...
I am favd with yours of the 27th and 28th ulto containing a more particular account of the enemy’s late attempt upon your post —I do not know what may be their design by landing up the River, but I think you had better desire Colo. Shreves Parties from New Ark to endeavour to keep up a communication with Colo. Clarke’s from Paramus, which will hinder them from effecting any thing by surprize....
The Bearer Mr Thomas Smith a Gentleman particularly recommended by Govr Henry of Virginia—has my permission to go into New York on his private affairs—You will therefore furnish him with a Flag for that purpose. I am Sir Your most obedt servt. Df , in John Laurens’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW . Thomas Smith, from Gloucester County, Va., where he was a planter and merchant,...
Colonel Shrieve informs me that several persons who had been made prisoners by the Indians, have lately returned from Captivity—and that they are known to you —in this case, I request that you will inform me of their names characters and places of abode by the first opportunity. be pleased likewise to let me know, whether you have thought of the boots mentioned in a late letter. I am &. Df ,...
It seems to be the Opinion of several of the prisoners and also of the Deserters that have lately come out, that the Enemy intend to move to morrow morning. How well founded this Idea may be, I cannot tell, but I thought it right to communicate it to you, that you may be ⟨watc⟩hfull and guarded on all the Roads. It will be well to place some of your ⟨men⟩ at the pass on the Road which has been...
In answer to your letter of yesterdays date —I have to inform you that no blankets can be issued, until I have obtained an exact return of the quantity in Store—and the deficiences of the Troops on the other side of Hudsons River—As soon as these points are ascertained in order to an equal and general distribution—no time will be lost in furnishing the quotas to the Troops —I am Sir &. Df , in...
I have recd yours of the 28th from Trenton. The Arms out of which you were to have been supplied had come on as far as sussex Court House, but for some reason or other Genl Gates ordered them back to New Windsor. I have sent up and ordered them down in the most express manner. Untill they arrive I cannot supply you. You say you think Bordentown a more suitable place for your main Body than...
I have rec‘d your favr of yesterday. Captain Rochfontaine, who will deliver this, will view the Ground you have pitched upon and, if he approves of it, will trace out the proper works. Should he, upon reconnoitering the Country in the neighbourhood, find any other piece of Ground accomodated with Water &c. which he thinks more advantageous, than the one you have chosen, he will, if you agree...
I have your two favs. of this date. In consequence of the remonstrance from the Inhabitants near Elk I have commanded Armands Corps to repair immediately to this place. If any of the people who have been injured can point out the particular persons either Officers or Soldiers they shall be made Examples of—As several accounts seem to agree that the Enemy mean to come out tomorrow Morning, I...
You will be pleased to transmit the inclosed Letter to Colo. Butler by a flag. This Gentleman has requested an interview with Genl Lee, who is to meet him. A House near Elizabeth Town point is thought most convenient for the meeting—and has been proposed to them both. Colo. Butler is to appoint the time and to inform you, of which you will advise Genl Lee and furnish any passports that may be...
I recd yours of the 17th by Capt Rochefontaine. Was I not so taken up with the Committee of Congress now in Camp, I would ride down myself and endeavour to fix upon the most advantageous place and manner for your Brigade to encamp, so as to answer the purpose for which it was sent down and at the same time pay a proper attention to its security-- I have therefore instructed Lord Stirling to go...
I have ordered Lt Col. Washington to Westfield with his cavalry you will be pleased to assign him such a position as you may judge best for the purpose of covering the forage I am sir Yr. P.S. In consequence of intelligence received from Govr Livingston, respecting preparations of the enemy on Staten Island —I have directed Gen: Wayne to move to Acquackanac and Gen: Sullivan to act according...
Upon my arrival at Middle Brook I shall furnish you with Instructions for the command at this post and its vicinity, at which you are to remain with the Jersey Brigade. I have at present to desire that you will take every measure to prevent an intercourse between the Country and New York and that no persons, inhabitants of these States, may be permitted to go thither or into the Enemy’s lines...
I was last Night favd with yours of the 2d with a York paper for which I am obliged to you. I have only to recommend to you, to keep a vigilant watch upon the motions of the Enemy upon Staten Island, and upon their fleet in the Bay. If you procure any certain intelligence that any considerable number of ships are preparing for sea, let me know it immediately, that I may communicate it to Count...
I have received Your Letter of the 12th Instant. The third Regiment will march on Monday for this Camp, where the Commanding Officer will receive further Orders. The other Regiment of the Brigade will be held in readiness to move on the earliest notice. With respect to the Artillery, they will move either with the Regiment on Monday or with the Other as you may determine; but they are to join...
I rode down to this place that I might be in the way, should the enemy, by their preparations upon Staten Island, seem to threaten any thing serious. But having heard nothing further to make me beleive that they intend to come over in any considerable force, I shall return part of the way to West point this Evening. Should they make any move towards you, you will give instant notice to General...
I have recd your favr of the 26th and 27th and this day the inclosed representation from a number of the Inhabitants of the neighbourhood of Elizabeth Town was handed to me. Their account of the nature of the Ground which you have pitched upon for your Encampment and for the Works, agrees with what you mentioned in yours of the 26th and I would for that reason wish the commencement of the...
You are appointed to the command at Elizabeth Town at which place you are to remain with the New Jersey Brigade: But Should you be of opinion that the troops can be more conveniently quartered by removing part to New Ark, you may order a Regiment or as many to that place as circumstances shall require. The principal object of your position is to prevent the Enemy stationed upon Staten Island...
I have your favr of yesterday accompanied by four New York papers for which I am obliged and return you the latest Pennsylvania and Maryland in exchange —As it is not thought proper to send in those, who have deserted from the Convention Troops, to be exchanged as prisoners of War, you will be pleased to send all at present at Elizabeth Town to Morris Town where the Guard has been strengthened...
We have had repeated accounts that a considerable Fleet has been seen off the Coast of Monmouth, but as none of them have been sufficiently accurate to determine whether it is really so, or whether if so, they are Friends or Enemies, the Marquis de la Fayette concludes to send down Colo. Jimat to the Coast to gain certain information. He will be at Brunswick tomorrow Morning by 10 OClock. You...
I am favd with yours of the 31st Decemr inclosing two letters from Major Howell. To prevent a too frequent intercourse by Flag Boats I lately wrote to the Governors of Pennsylvania and New Jersey and pointed out the inconveniences of people’s coming almost daily with permissions from them to go into New York, which occasioned the Officer commanding at Elizabeth Town to send a Flag with each...
I yesterday received a letter of the 24th inst. from Colonel Shreve, in which he renews his application for Arms, and complains of the distressing want of Shirts in your Brigade—it is unluckily out of my power to do any thing in addition to the order with which you are already furnished relative to the first article. With respect to the latter as there are no Shirts in camp, I can point out no...
In a letter from Genl Gates of yesterdays date, I received the following intelligence—“Two Sailors belonging to Cape Cod—who made their escape from the prison ship last monday night, arrived here—they declare that the british fleet of Men of War, sailed ten days ago, in quest of the french fleet” —An event of this importance I think would not have escaped your notice—and I hope the report is...
Upon examining the State of our Ammunition I find it so generally hurt by the Rain that we are not in Condition to make a stand against the Enemy—I have therefore thought best to move up towards Warwick Furnace in order to obtain a Supply from the other side Schuylkill & have given orders accordingly Genl Greene[’s] Division remains here & Genl Wayne’s between this & Warwick untill the Baggage...
Yours of three oClock this morning, I have received. I do not think you have much to fear from the party that has been sent over to Bohemia, who lie greatly to the Southward of you & too remote from where you now are, easily to injure you. It is im[a]gined the design of their going there is to extend across from Bohemia river to Apoquiminy, by which means, they will prevent the Eastern shore...
I have just received a letter from Capt. Stokes stationed at Bonum Town—informing me that the enemy on Staten Island appear to be in motion, and have been collecting boats both at New York and at the Island —You will therefore redouble your vigilance and be ready to oppose any attempt they may make near you. I am informed there is a considerable number of fat cattle between Wood-bridge and the...
It is at this present crisis extremely interesting to our conduct to learn with exactness and certainty the force that is reported to have sailed for New Port by way of the Sound, & that from the Hook, and whose command they are under. It will be necessary to discover what particular corps have been embarked—what baggage—what heavy cannon and artillery and how the transports (those especially...
I duly recd your two favors of the 1st and 3d inst. I wish you to be as diligent as possible in gaining further intelligence respecting the embarkation of troops—how many and what regiments—what quantity of provisions they have on board—whether for a long or short voyage—and if the soldiers have received any additional light clothing adapted to a warm climate. You will give immediate orders to...
I am well convincd that the amazing desertions which have of late prevail’d among our Troops, proceeds intirely from their not being regularly paid; For it is not to be supposed, that the bare encouragement of recieving a few Dollars from the Enemy for their Arms could operate so forcibly upon them. I have in vain endeavour’d to make the officers bring in their Pay Rolls and draw their money,...