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    • Washington, George
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As you are about to meet on other business, it is my desire, that you would take the enclosed application into consideration. It is not my wish, on one hand, to throw unnecessary obstacles in the way of gratifying the wishes of the applicants. On the other, it is incumbent on me to proceed with regularity. Would not the granting a Patent then, which I believe is always the concluding Act and...
Expecting that my private Affairs will call me to Virginia on or before the 25th of this month, I have to request that you will lay before me, previous to that time, such matters within your department as may require my attention or agency before I set out; as well as those which might be necessary for me to know or act upon during my absence from the Seat of Government (which will be about...
As the public service may require that communications should be made to me, during my absence from the seat of government, by the most direct conveyances and as, in the event of any very extraordinary occurrence, it will be necessary to know at what time I may be found in any particular place, I have to inform you that unless the progress of my journey to Savannah is retarded by unforeseen...
The posture of affairs in Europe, particularly between France and Great Britain, places the United States in a delicate situation; and requires much consideration of the measures which will be proper for them to observe in the War betwn. those Powers. With a view to forming a general plan of conduct for the Executive, I have stated and enclosed sundry questions to be considered preparatory to...
As the day is near at hand, when the President-elect is to take the oath of qualification, and no mode is pointed out by the Constitution or law; I could wish that you, mr Jefferson (Genl. Knox, or Colo. Hamilton) and mr Randolph could meet tomorrow morning, at any place which you may fix between yourselves; & communicate to me the result of your opinions as to time, place & manner of...
As the public service may require that communications should be made to me, during my absence from the seat of government, by the most direct conveyances—and as, in the event of any very extraordinary occurrence, it will be necessary to know at what time I may be found in any particular place, I have to inform you that unless the progress of my journey to Savannah is retarded by unforeseen...
As the public service may require that communications should be made to me, during my absence from the seat of government, by the most direct conveyances, and as, in the event of any very extraordinary occurrence, it will be necessary to know at what time I may be found in any particular place, I have to inform you that unless the progress of my journey to Savannah is retarded by unforeseen...
To The Secretary of State—The Secretary of the Treasury—The Secretary of War and The Attorney General of the United States. Gentlemen, The Treaty which is agreed to be held on or about the first of June next at the Lower Sandusky of Lake Erie, being of great moment to the interests and peace of this Country; and likely to be attended with difficulties arising from circumstances (not unknown to...
As you are about to meet on other business, it is my desire that you would take the enclosed application into consideration. It is not my wish, on one hand, to throw unnecessary obstacles in the way of gratifying the wishes of the applicants. On the other it is incumbent on me to proceed with regularity. Would not the granting of a Patent then, which I believe is always the concluding act, and...
Fresh occurrences, but communicated thro’ private channels, make it indispensable that the general principles which have already been the subject of discussion should be fixed, & made known for the government of all concerned, as soon as it can be done with propriety. To fix rules on substantial ground, conformably to treaties & the Laws of nations, is extremely desireable. The verdict of the...
Tomorrow I shall commence my journey for Virginia. My absence from the seat of Government will be as short as I can make it, to answer the purposes of my going. In the interim, occurrences may happen, out of the common routine which might suffer by delay. Where this is the case, & the matter is of importance, advise with the other Secretaries, & the Attorney General, and carry any unanimous...
Expecting that my private affairs will call me to Virginia on or before the 25 of this month, I have to request that you will lay before me, previous to that time, such matters within your Department as may require my attention or agency before I set out, as well as those which might be necessary for me to know or act upon during the time of my absence from the Seat of Government (which will...
It is my wish to set off for Mount Vernon on Monday next. With some inconvenience to myself, it might be delayed until Wednesday; beyond which the purposes of my journey would, in a great measure, be defeated by further delay. I therefore desire that everything which requires my attention in your Department previous to my absence, may be laid before me with as much promptitude as the case will...
The President of the United States requests the attendance of the at Nine o’Clock tomorrow morning ; at the President’s house, on the subject of the note sent to the on the 17~. inst: and that the will bring with him such remarks as he may have committed to writing in pursuance of said note. At the same time the President will lay before the Heads of the Departments & the Attorney General some...
Expecting that my private Affairs will call me to Virginia on or before the 25th of this month, I have to request that you will lay before me, previous to that time, such matters within your department as may require my attention or agency before I set out; as well as those which might be necessary for me to know or act upon during my absence from the Seat of Government (which will be about...
It will not be amiss, I conceive, at the meeting you are about to have to day, to consider the expediency of directing the Customhouse Officers to be attentive to the arming or equipping Vessels, either for offensive or defensive war, in the several ports to which they belong; and make report thereof to the Governor or some other proper Officer. Unless this, or some other effectual mode is...
By His Excellency George Washington Esqr. General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of the United States of America. To Major General Willm Heath and Major General Henry Knox. Whereas the Honorable the Delegates of the United States in Congress assembled, have been pleased to authorize and impower me, by Letters patent under the Great Seal bearing date the 16th day of September Anno Domini...
The Powers of equal date herewith Authorize you to proceed to Tappan in Orange County in the State of New York and there meet Commissioners from the British for the purposes mentiond in your powers. You are to pay the most pointed attention to the nature of your Powers which are founded upon Letters Patent under the Great Seal of the United States bearing date the 16th instant a Copy of which...
Instructions for Major General St Clair, Major General Baron Kalb, and Brigadier General Knox. Gentlemen You are to proceed with all convenient expedition to Fort Mercer, where by conferring with Brigadier General Varnum, Commodore Hazlewood and such other Officers as you may think proper to consult—and from your own view of the ground and river, you will investigate the following Points. 1....
I inclose you a petition from Robinson who is under sentence of death for your consideration. If you concieve from his present disposition, or past conduct—any hopes of his becoming a useful soldier, you have my permission to suspend his punishment—But if you imagine it indispensibly necessary to make an example you will have his sentence put into execution. Df , in James McHenry’s writing,...
I have taken into consideration your letter of the 15th of last month, and I approve of the proposals therein suggested, of endeavoring to avoid a War with the Creek nation of Indians. I approve particularly of your requesting Mr Hawkins to send the letter to Alexander McGillivray a copy of which you have enclosed—and I authorize you to employ a suitable person to conduct the business, and to...
Captain Machin being under arrest there would be an impropriety in his transacting any public business—or in granting him leave of absence from Camp. His Trial must soon come on in course, if that terminates in his favor I shall then have no objection to granting the leave requested, and if in the mean time any business of the Corps requires that an Officer should go to Philadelphia, leave...
I have the honor to enclose a letter from Monsr Cottineau de Kerloquin requesting an admission into the Society of the Cincinnati—and one from the Chevalier D’Anmours setting forth the services of that Gentleman and his pretensions to admission. Both of which I must beg you to lay before the Society at their next General Meeting that they may take the necessary steps thereon; unless it shall...
In my letter of the 15th I acknowledged the receipt of yours of the 11th; since which your dispatches of the 16th are come to hand, and convey but a gloomy prospect of peace with the Indians, in either hemisphere; but shew the necessity of preparing more vigorously if possible for the dernier resort. That the Western Indians are stimulated to acts of hostility on one side, and every mean which...
By twelve OClock on Friday you will have ready all such peices of your park as are most proper to annoy shipping and cover a body of troops across a River—A releif of Horses to accompany them will be desirable if they are to be had. Your usual punctuality assures me of the same in this instance. I am Dear Sir Your most obt huble Servt ViRVal .
I had the Inclosed in my pocket but forgot to give it to you yesterday. I pray you to let the Parole &ca of the day only be known at a time, keeping the others to your self, to avoid the evil of a premature discovery. I am sincerely and Affectionately Yr Privately owned.
After giving the application contained in the Memorial of Doctr White (herewith returned) all the consideration it deserves, you will report what you think can & ought to be done for the protection of the District of Mero under present circumstances. I am &c. Df , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . On the memorial presented by James White, which requested federal assistance in the defense of the Mero...
Letter not found: to Henry Knox, 25 Jan. 1787. On 8 Feb. Knox wrote GW : “I have received your favor of the 25 Jany.”
(Private) Dear Sir, Philadelphia Decr 26th 1791 The enclosed is a private letter from Colo. Nicholas (an influential character in Kentucky) to the Attorney General. He put it into my hands to read; I, without having asked his permission, send it to you for the same purpose, of course the communication is confidential. My reason for sending it to you is, to shew you the uniform sentiment of...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] December 8, 1779 . Instructs Knox to send artillery pieces and men to man them to the Southern Department. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress.
My letter of the 15th inst. mentioned that I had not received any letters from you between the 15th and the 30 of May—it should have been the 15th of April and 30th of May. By the last post from the southward I received yours of the 17th of April—which renders a duplicate of that letter unnecessary. As it appears to be alike requisite to the satisfaction of the public mind and to General...
Amongst the last Aacts of my political life, and before I go hence into retirement, profound , will be the acknowledgment of your kind and affectionate letter from Boston—dated the 15th of January. From the friendship I have always borne you—and from the interest I have ever taken in whatever relates to your prosperity & happiness, I participated in the sorrows which I knoew you must have felt...
(Private) Dr Sir. [Philadelphia] Thursday Morning Feby 28th 1793 It is much to be regretted that the subject of Rations (encreased) had not been thought of and considered at an earlier period! It is to be feared a proposition at this time would be received with an ill grace. probably no attention paid to it. At the meeting you are about to have it might be well to mention the matter and know...
Your letter of the 8th instt with its enclosures came duly to hand. It is painful, after the exertions Government have made to keep the Southern Indians quiet, & the expence that has been incurred to effect it, to receive such unfavorable accts from that quarter as are contained in the letters of Mr Seagroves which you have forwarded to me. From Genl Waynes Representation of the want of...
Your letter of this date, enclosing one from Captn Williamson, is received. I have never entertained any doubt myself of the genuineness of the Speech which is published as Lord Dorchester’s; nor of the intentions of the B—— Government to keep this Country in a state of disquietude With the Indian nations; and also to alter the boundary between them and us, if, by any means, they can effect...
Finding it essential to public Interest that you should superintend the Posts & Military affairs in this Department; untill some farther Arrangement or untill the pleasure of Congress shall be known; I therefore to request that you remain in Service untill the foregoing events shall place—in the mean time will be pleased to pay part attention to the enclosed In respectg a reformation of the...
Your letter of the 1st inst: I have duly recd—likewise one of the 4th, covering a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury together with some communications from Lt Colo. Beckwith. I herewith transmit you an Address & Memorial of the Officers, Civil & Military, of the District of Miro, which was sent to me by Govr Blount—I wish you to take the same into your consideration, & make a Report...
From present appearances, and the Season of the Year, there is little reason to beleive, that a cooperation, with the French Admiral, can possibly take place. In consequence of this opinion, and to avoid as much as possible a further increase of expence, I have to request you to suspend such of your arrangements as were designed for this purpose, and which, unless this event were to take...
By slow, I wish I could add & sure, movements, the business of the Convention progresses; but to say when it will end, or what will be the result, is more than I can venture to do; and therefore shall hazard no opinion thereon. If however, some good does not proceed from the Session, the defects cannot, with propriety, be charged to the hurry with which the business has been conducted: yet...
The considerations which you have often suggested to me, and are repeated in your letter of the 28th instant; as requiring your departure from your present office, are such, as to preclude the possibility of my urging your continuance in it. This being the case, I can only wish that it was otherwise. I cannot suffer you, however, to close your public service without uniting with the...
I shall be glad to see you as early as you can conveniently make it tomorrow Morning. If matters remain quiet, I wish you to ride to Trenton, to lay a representation of a very important nature before the Legislature. I am with great Regard Dear Sir Yr most obt Servt CStbK .
I have recd your Letter of the 17th inst; with it’s enclosure from Genl Wayne. Whatever Genl Wayne may require towards the equipmt of his troops for the service for wch they are designed, provided a compliance therewith be authorised by Law, I think had better be granted. powder in particular, precisely such as he desires, I would furnish him with in order that there may be no room for...
Soon after my last was dispatched to you, I was favoured with the receipt of your letter of the 14th Ult.; by which, and other accts of more recent date, I am sorry to find that the important question under deliberation in Massachusetts, stands on such precarious ground. The decision of that State will, unquestionably, have considerable influence on those which are to follow; especially on the...
The Session of Congress having closed, and it being my intention to go to Virginia as soon as the public business will permit; and wishing, during my absence from the Seat of Government, to have my mind as free from public cares as circumstances will allow; I am desireous of having such matters as may, by Law or otherwise, require the agency or sanction of the President of the United States,...
I approve of your sentiments given to the Officers commanding the Regiments at West Point, respecting the carrying into execution the sentence of Courts Martial upon the Rioters, mentioned in your Letter of this day, & they will stand justified with me. I am loth at this time to consent to the absence of Officers from their Corps, wanting their influence as much as possible, to quiet & allay...
(Private) Dear Sir Mount Vernon 25th June 1794. Your letter of the 18th instt came to me by the Post wch arrived in Alexandria on Monday evening. It is not more unusual than it is difficult to account for the motives wch induce Gov. M——’s either to antedate or to detain after they are written the letters which I receive from him. That there is design in it, admits of little doubt in my mind....
I have received Colo. Lamb’s letter addressed to you, by which he desires you "to ask me if ever Col. Bigelow solicited me to order a Court of Enquiry into his conduct at the attack on Quebec, on the 31st Decr 1775" In answer to this question I can only say that I recollect something passed between Col. Bigelow and myself a long time ago, I believe soon after he returned from Canada, on the...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 30, 1779 . Sends instructions concerning brigade artillery. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Count Wengiersky, a Polish Gentleman travelling the Continent for his amusement, will have the pleasure to deliver you this; he comes recommended to me by the Marquis de la Fayette and by the Minister of France and as he proposes to take West-point in his tour I take the liberty to Request your civilities to him during his stay there. Mr Vernon, an English Gentleman lately from Europe travels...
The cessation of hostilities having been now proclaimed, you will permit any Citizens of the State of New York or of the United States to pass and Repass your Post with any Vessels, Boats or Water Crafts without any hindrance or molestation on their Reporting themselves to you or to such Officer as shall be appointed by you for the purpose. I am Sir Your most Obedt Servt Sent also to William...