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A few days ago Mr Sitgreaves gave me the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 4th of May. It is the only one I recollect to have had from you since my return to private life. It gives me pleasure to hear that Congress have dealt honorably by you, & mean to do more; it is devoutly to be wished that they could do the same by all the Officers whose meritorious services & sufferings have a...
I feel great pleasure in communicating to you the inclosed Resolves of Congress, approving your conduct in the execution of the service on which you have been employed: as well as that of the Troops who were under your Orders. As great part of these Troops have already Returned to West Point, I transmitted the Resolves of Congress to Major General Knox, in a letter of which the inclosed is...
Congress by a Resolve of this date, have directed me to dispose of the Regiment which remains at Philadelphia in any manner I shall see fit. As the business which required the Presence of Troops at Philadelphia is accomplished & the proceedings approved and acted upon by Congress, I am to desire that all the Troops at that place who are able to March may commence it immediately for West point....
As there is but one Regiment at Philadelphia to March to West Point, and the Troops when they get there take their Orders from the Commanding Officer of the Garrison (agreeably to the Original disposition of them) till Congress shall have determined upon a Peace Establishment; there can be no necessity for your Marching with your present command, in its reduced state to that place. I mention...
I have been favored with your private letter of the 21st, & should have given it an acknowledgement sooner but thought a few days would have let me more into the views of Congress with respect to the Peace Establishment than I had any knowledge of at the time of its receipt—I am as much in the dark now as ever, and as unable to guess at the number of Troops which may be retained or raised for...
Your several Letters of the 19 20 & 21 of this month are come to hand. My Papers being yet behind, prevents a reference to my last letter to you from Newburg but, if I recollect, it is explicit as to the number of Troops and the necessity of their immediate March—the purpose for which they were ordered on will not admit delay, and I must desire that not only Sprouts Regiment—but as many more...
Your Letter of the 23d July was handed to me on my Return from the Northward. The advanced Season of the Year makes it absolutely necessary that the Troops and every thing destined for the Posts on our Western Frontiers, should be put in a situation to move, the moment we can learn when the British will evacuate them. I must therefore desire you to order back four or five hundred Men of your...
I am to acknowledge the recet of your Letter of the 7th of this Month. Before the recet of your Letter Genl St Clair havg hinted the necessity of sending on the Judge Advocate he had accordingly set off to Join you & I hope that by this time you have got thro’ this troublesome business. I am &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have received your favor of the 3d inst. dated at Trenton. In Consequence of a Letter from M. Genl St Clair & at his Request, I have ordered the Judge Advocate to proceed to Phila.—this Gentlemans Assistance will probably be necessary in the prosecution of the Business intrusted to your Investigation I have directed him to attend on you, and to give every Aid in his power, in an Affair, that...
I have this Morng been favored with your two Letters of the 1st of July—with a Resolution of Congress directg you to proceed with the Troops to Phila. The March of the Detachment of Jacksons Regiment had not been countermanded by me—but I am glad to find it has been done under directions of Congress. I am &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
You are to take the command of the Detachment ordered to march to Philadelphia in consequence of the Letter of the Presidt of Congress of the 21st instant—you will move with as much expedition as you can consistently with the health & comfort of the Troops—This Corps must be absolutely light & unencumbered with Baggage, having only two Peices of Field Artillery—you will make Arrangements with...
I have no objection to your setting out for Boston tomorrow, and heartily wish you a pleasant journey & safe return. My Sentiments publicly & privately have been so fully delivered, that I shall say nothing respecting your return. I do not wish to defeat the end & purposes of your going, by limiting the term of your absence to a shorter period than is necessary to accomplish the business which...
I am favord with your Letter of Yesterday. When you mentiond to me the other day the probability of your Affairs requiring your presence at Boston—I believe I told you that if there was an absolute necessity for it—leave should be granted—It is painfull to me to Refuse an Officer any Indulgence it is in my power to grant, but some thing is due to other considerations, the good of Service and...
I enclose to you the Arran g emt of Field Officers in the Mass. Line; but as it is not final & may be subject to alteration from various contingency, I have not thought proper that it should be announced in the General Orders—but it will be necessary for you to post the Field Officers to the Regt agreeably to that arrangement, until further Orders that they may take their Commands...
I find myself under the disagreeable necessity of furnishing you with the Copy of Genl Heaths report of 28th Inst. Report made to me yesterday by Major General Heath—In consequence of this I am obliged to call upon you for your Reasons of absenting yourself from your Division on the march from Verplanks Point to this Ground. I am Sir Yr most obt & hbl. servt. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
If your application is not to Congress—directly—it must be through the Secretary at War agreeable to a Resolve of Congress. The enquiry into your conduct was instituted in consequence of an order of Congress & was once before the board of War. Your coming to this place was by no order of mine & consequently the Necessity of it unknown to me—The Acct will, no doubt, be referred to the board of...
I received with much Pleasure your Congratulations conveyed to me in your Favr of the 4th. I think, Considering the length of Time already passed since your Operations in Georgia, that you are quite in the Right to have the Inquiry on your Conduct during that Time, brot to as early Decision as Circumstances will admit—I can easily conceive your present Situation to be very disagreable—& wish...
The constant Attention I have been obliged to pay to the March of the Troops—forwarding Stores—procuring Necessaries &c. for the Expedition in Contemplation with other unavoidable Circumstances, have prevented my giving an Answer to your private Letter, which I received at Philadelphia, before this Day. I am very sorry you have taken up the Matter in so serious a Light as seems to appear from...
I am favour’d with your Letter of this date; the Artificers you mention that have been drafted from the several Regiments will continue at the Point ’till further orders. I am with respect your most obedt Humbe Servant. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have received your favor of last Night—The Measures which have been taken in consequence of the information, appear to me, to have been very proper. When our Officers on the Lines are thus apprised, should the Enemy presume to make an incursion, I cannot but flatter myself they will be made to suffer for their temerity. I am Dr Sr With great regard &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I am favored with yours of this date, enclosing a Note from Mrs Mortier—to whom a Billet is also forwarded under cover to you, which I request you to transmit to her by the return of the Flag. You will have the goodness to suffer nothing at all to be landed from the flag, and to give orders for the departure of it as soon as may be with convenience; You will be pleased to give directions to...
I have yours of Yesterday inclosing Letter from Genl Waterbury—If the Information is to be depended upon all the Whale Boats & the Cattle should be removed as soon as may be—the first on Carriages or otherwise as may be found convenient—Colo. Scammel may be ordered towards the Point of Operation, & make such Use of the Troops on the Line as his Discretion may direct—establishg a Communication...
At a Board of General Officers convened at New Windsor N.Y. the 12th day of June 1781. Present His Excellency the Commander in Chief M. General Lord Stirling Brigadiers Generals Knox Genl Howe Paterson Genl Parsons Hand Genl McDougall Huntington Du Portail
I am this moment favored with yours of the same date together with the Report of the Board of Officers, appointed to inspect Provisions. If there are any Blunderbusses & Swivels, I have no objection that Capt. Pray should be furnished with them, tho I think, that vigilance and attention, will be his surest protection against the Enemy. I have to request that you will be pleased to attend at...
Mr Kirkland has delivered me your letter of Yesterday with one from B. Genl Patterson, respecting King under sentance of Death. In Consequence of their sollicitations in his Favr, I have consented that he shall be pardoned for his Offence—& not subjected to the Execution of his Sentence; his Releace from Service for obvious Reasons is not admissible. You will be pleasd to send him by the first...
The misterious conduct of the enemy at New York--and their appearance in force (as it is reported to me) at Crown point--with other circumstances unnecessary to detail--renders caution and vigilance extremely necessary at our Posts in the Highlands--I therefore desire that you will not delay a moment after your return to West point & to your command there in obtaining & reporting to me an...
I have received your favors of the 12th of April from portsmouth and 19th from Boston. Business of a very urgent public nature will oblige me to send General Heath immediately to the Eastern States—I am therefore under the necessity of desiring your Return as speedily as possible to take the command at West point, which, with all its dependencies, will be left with only one Brigadier. I am...
Your Favor of the 2nd with the enclosures have just been received. I would not wish Major Galvan to place any dependance on a Command in the Light Corps during the ensuing Campaign—These appointments having commonly been made in some measure by Rotation. With great consideration I am Dear Sir Your Most Obedt Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
New Windsor [ New York ] January 29, 1781 . Sends instructions to have loyal troops remain near the New Jersey line. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have received your letter of this day with the papers accompanying it. For fear of a revival of the discontents in the Jersey line, I think it advisable there should remain near them other troops on whose fidelity we can more perfectly rely—on this account I approve the detention of the New Hampshire detachment and the Artillery ’till we hear something more of the movements on Staten Island....
I have not heard a word of the Jersey Troops, since the first intelligence of their defection—And am extremely anxious to know the true state of Matters—for this purpose, I shall set out tomorrow towards you; but Not with a design of superseding your command, &c. Be pleased to give me all the information you can obtain by Express, that it may meet me somewhere on the road. I am Dr Sir With...
West Point, January 22, 1781. Places Howe in command of detachment ordered to attempt to quell mutiny in New Jersey. Sends general instructions. Df , in writings of George Washington and H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
You are to take the command of the detachment, which has been ordered to march from this post against the mutineers of the Jersey line. You will rendezvous the whole of your command at Ringwood or Compton as you find best from circumstances—The object of your detachment is to compel the mutineers to unconditional submission—and I am to desire you will grant no terms while they are with arms in...
I was favored last Evening with your Letter of the 17th Instant. It will not be necessary, under the present circumstances, I believe, to draw shoes for the Detachment out of the common Mode. I am Dear Sir With great regard & esteem Your Most Obed. Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have just received your favor of this day, and am pleased with the good disposition of the Troops, which indeed is no more than I expected—By intelligence this Moment received from Genl Wayne, it is not probable the Detachment will March, tho I would still have it held in readiness. The Pennsylvanians, have arrived at Trenton, and Delivered up the Spies, who were to be executed on the 11th...
[ Preakness, New Jersey ] November 27, 1780 . Sends instructions for the march to Kings Ferry. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
You will perceive by the order of March that you are to take the direction of the column which marches to Kings ferry—You will proceed there accordingly—in the manner prescribed.and when you arrive send your baggage up by water, marching the troops by land—to their respective cantonments the Connecticut line crossing the ferry will proceed up the East side of the River—the Massachusetts line...
I have recd your favor of the 10th respecting the payment for the Rum seized by your order. since I saw you, I am informed there is a Resolve of Congress, which I have not seen, pointing out a mode of payment with interest and I think making allowance for depreciation, if any. The first time I see the Commy General, I will make the necessary inquiry and inform you more fully. I am Dear Sir Yr...
When I called at your Quarters this Morning, I had no business particularly in View, I proposed only taking a ride to the River, & should have been happy in Your Company if you had been disengaged. You will be pleased to accept my thanks for your communications & believe me Dear Sir with great esteem Your Most Obedient & very Hble Servant DLC : Papers of George Washington.
[ Teaneck, New Jersey ] August 24, 1780 . Questions manner in which Howe’s baggage was guarded. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
In the report of the march of yesterday, it appears there was to your baggage a guard of a serjeant and four men, contrary to the regulations and to General orders. I am persuaded this must have happened by mistake; but as it is of the greatest importance that the General officers should set an example of regularity to the army I mention the matter to you that you may take effectual care to...
I have recd yours of the 26th—The Army will move from this Ground tomorrow Morning by the Paramus Route, you will therefore direct your dispatches in future to take that Road. Our present stock of Musket Cartridges being very insufficient for the probable demand, you will be pleased to order seventy or eighty Infantry and about twenty Artillery Men to take Colo. Lambs directions for carrying...
I am to request that you will be pleased, on receipt of this, to put the Troops under your Command in motion as soon as may be—except the New-Hampshire Brigade & such of the Militia as you may judge necessary for the Garrison of West Point & its dependencies. You will direct the N. York, Connecticut & Massachusetts Lines, and the remainder of the Militia, to march successively in the order...
I have been regularly favored with your several letters, two of the 22d and two of the 23d instant. The intelligence I have received from different quarters is of the same nature as that of yours, and speaks of an embarkation destined against our allies at Rhode Island. The communications which you made to Major General Heath, on this subject, were very proper whether the enemy mean only...
Upon examining the Return of Military Stores at West Point for the Month of June I find there were only 662 Muskets in the Commissary’s hands. This appears to me most extraordinary as the number of Rank and File of the Massachusetts line amounted on the last of Novemb. 1779 to 4569. and on the last of June past to only 1623 which makes a difference of 2946 Men, who must have been discharged,...
This will be handed to you by Lieut. Meigs of Colonel Webb’s Regt, who is directed to receive and bring forward the proportion of Connecticut Levies for that Regiment;You will be pleased to order them to be delivered to him accordingly. I am, with great esteem and regard &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have been a few hours since favored with yours of the 13th. With regard to the manoeuvring the Troops; under the circumstances you mention I think it may be instantly entered upon, as you are of opinion that it can be done without; risking the safety of the post—or that its garrison will be able to complete what still remains unfinished. I am Sir DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have recd your favors of the 8th—The State of Massachusetts having adopted Colo. Jacksons Regt and directed it to be considered in every respect as belonging to that line, it in course becomes intitled to a proportion of the drafts—For this purpose the Bearer Captain Hunt is sent up to receive the number which will fall to the share of the Regiment. I have not yet recd the Field Return of...
You will be pleased to furnish the Bearer Mr Abraham Martling with two Whale Boats well armed, for the purpose of sounding Haverstraw Bar. You will not let the persons who are to go in the Boats, or any others, know of this business previous to its execution; for should it come to the knowledge of the enemy, they might by sending up a Gallery, interrupt it intirely. I am &c. DLC : Papers of...
I recd your favor of the 3d with the Returns, to which it refers, inclosed. Colo. Gouvion—anxious to prepare Fascines, Gabions and sleepers for platforms, wishes a reinforcement of fatigue Men, to be kept constantly down towards the Village upon that service. I know not how such a measure may interfere with your present arrangements, and I can therefore only recommend to you to spare as many...