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You are intrusted with a Command of the utmost Consequence to the Interest & Liberties of America: Upon your Conduct & Courage & that of the Officers and ⟨Soldiers⟩ detached on this Expedition, not only the Success of the present Enterprize & your own Honour, but the Safety and Welfare of the whole Continent may depend. I ⟨charge⟩ you therefore and the Officers & Soldiers ⟨under⟩ your Command...
By his Excellency George Washington Esqr. Commander in Chief of the Army of the United Colonies of North America. Copy, in Thomas Mifflin’s writing, DLC:GW ; copy, DNA:PCC , item 152; copy, DNA:PCC , item 169; two copies, NjMoHP ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW . The copy in PCC, item 152 was enclosed in GW to Hancock, 21 Sept. 1775 . Arnold’s detachment left Cambridge between 11 and 13 September....
Your Letter of the 8 Ultimo with a Postscript of the 14 from Point Levi, I have had the pleasure to receive —It is not in the power of any man to command success, but you have done more—you have deserved it, & before this I hope, have met with the Laurels which are due to your Toils, in the possession of Quebec—My thanks are due, & sincerely offered to you, for your Enterprizing & persevering...
Your favour of the 5th ulto from before Quebec incloseing the returns of your detachment—is Come to hand[.] from the account you give of the Garrison & State of the Walls I expect soon to hear from you Within them, which will give me vast pleasure. I am informed that there are Large quantities of Arms—blankets Cloathing & other military Stores in that City—these are articles which we are in...
On the 17 Inst. I received the melancholy account of the unfortunate attack on the City of Quebec, attended with the fall of General Montgomery, and Other Brave Officers & men, & your being wounded—This unhappy affair affects me in a very sensible manner, & I sincerely condole with you upon the occasion[.] But in the midst of distress, I am happy to find that suitable Honor[s] were paid to the...
Your favour of the 27th Feby is come to hand. I much fear you will be much Disapointed in the number of Troops you Expected in that month as the Lakes were impassable. Major General Thomas will long before you receive this have informed you the Success of our operations here. the Enemy have quitted this harbour last week. we have no Certain Accounts of their Destination. it is Generally...
Having recd Advice from Govr Trumbull of the 6th Inst. that a large Fleet of the Enemy’s Men of War and Transports had appeared off New London, without doubt with an Intent to make a Descent either there or some part of the Coast of New England, and he desiring that some General Officers might be sent to take the Command of the Militia who were assembling. I must desire that you would...
Letter not found: to Brig. Gen. Benedict Arnold, 24 Jan. 1777. On 7 Feb. Arnold wrote GW that “Your favour of the 24th Ulto I had not the pleasure of receiveing untill the 3d Inst.”
I was this Evening favoured with your Letter of the 30th Ulto and am sorry to find the Forces now assembled in Rhode Island are not competent to the projects you have in view. The propriety of the Attack or of the plan, I cannot determine. The Map you sent and for which I return you my thanks, gives me an Idea of the situation of the Island but not so accurately as to pronounce upon the matter...
I was yesterday favd with yours of the 7th instant. It has some how or other generally happened that we have been obliged to send in our prisoners at the most inconvenient times, but when they are brought down for the purpose of Exchange, it seems hard to send them back, especially as they did not fix upon the time themselves. I am so well convinced that the Officers are enabled to do us harm,...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] March 3, 1777. Discusses Arnold’s proposed attack against Rhode Island. Notes that Arnold’s name was not on list of newly promoted major generals. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Arnold was at this time in Providence, Rhode Island. On May 2, 1777, Arnold was promoted to the rank of major general. On August 8, 1777, he was given a...
I am to acknowledge the receipt of your favour of the 10th of last month, with the enclosed papers. I must recall your attention to what I have before said on the subject of your intended attack. You must be sensible that the most serious ill consequences may and would, probably, result from it in case of failure; and prudence dictates that it should be cautiously examined in all its lights,...
I was this day favd with yours of the 26th last Month and a few days ago with that of the 11th. It is needless for me to say much upon a subject, which must undoubtedly give you a good deal of uneasiness. I confess I was surprized when I did not see your Name in the list of Major Generals, and was so fully of opinion that there was some mistake in the matter, that I (as you may recollect)...
I am happy to find that a late resolve of Congress of the 2nd instant, has restored you to the continental army. The importance of the Post at Peeks Kill and its appendages has become so great that it is now necessary, to have a Major General appointed to the command of it, you will therefore immediately repair to that Post and take charge of it, till a general arrangement of the army can be...
I imagine that since Genl Schuylers departure from Philada you command there. I therefore inclose you the Evidence of a person very lately from N. York, from which as well as from other information it appears that a Fleet is upon the point of sailing from New York —If Philada should be the place of destination they will make their appearance in Delaware Bay soon after they leave the Hook. I...
Letter not found: to Maj. Gen. Benedict Arnold, 14 June 1777. In his letter to Maj. Gen. Thomas Mifflin of 15 June, Arnold writes: “I have recd no intelligence from Gen. Washington since 4 oClk last Evening.”
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] June 17, 1777. Describes position at Middlebrook and plans of attack. Discusses probability of enemy attack on the army at Middlebrook and on Philadelphia. Orders Arnold to send on Continental troops. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have received your favor of the 16th Instant. You mention a want of intelligence respecting my situation, and, that of the Enemy—As to mine the main Body of our Army are incamp’d at Middle Brook, and a considerable force under Genl Sullivan lies at Sourland Hills—Our position is strong, and with a little labour will be render’d much more so—The passes in the Mountains are most of them...
Inclosed you will receive a Commission, by which you will find, that you are restored to the rank you claim in the line of the Army. This I transmit by direction of Congress and in pursuance of their Resolution of the 29th of November. The situation of my papers & the want of Blank Commissions prevented me doing it before. May I venture to ask whether you are upon your Legs again—and if you...
[ Doctor Shannon’s, near Valley Forge ] June 19, 1778 . Instructs Arnold to proceed to Philadelphia and to take command of troops there. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
You are immediately to proceed to Philadelphia and take the command of the troops there. The principal objects of your command you will send specified in the inclosed resolve of Congress of the 4th instant; which you will carefully execute. You will take every prudent step in your power, to preserve tranquillity and order in the city, and give security to individuals of every class and...
This will be delivered you by Major Wemp who has the conduct & care of some Warriors from the Seneca Nation—who are also accompanied by a few of our Oneida & Tuscarora Friends. The inclosed Extract of a Letter from our Indian Commissioners at Albany, will inform you of the Senecas’s business in this Quarter. I cannot give them the smallest account of Astiarix of whom they are in pursuit, nor...
I have been favoured with your’s of this date. I arrived myself about three oClock to day on the East side of the Delaware and the main body of the Army on the other, from whence they will cross to morrow. This afternoon has been employed in passing the Artillery and such Baggage as could be got over. The Enemy from the last intelligence were at Mount Holly and at Mores Town, their precise...
Letter not found : to Benedict Arnold, 29 June 1778. On 30 June Arnold wrote GW : “I received your Excellency’s Favour of yesterday.”
As we are again in possession of philadelphia and it may possibly happen that in the course of the War, the Enemy may form some design against it, either in reality or appearance, I have sent General Portail to examine what defences may be essential for it’s security and to make his report to me, as soon as the nature of the business will admit. In order to facilitate this, I am to request...
I received your fav⟨or of the 30th Ulto⟩ and thank you much for your ⟨kind and⟩ affectionate congratulations. As yo⟨u will⟩ have seen before this, the account of ⟨ the ⟩ Action transmitted to Congress, I shall ⟨only⟩ add, since that was given, most of ⟨ the ⟩ Enemy have been found dead in ⟨ the ⟩ woods near the field of action and on ⟨their⟩ route according to report; and that de⟨sertions⟩ yet...
Your favor of the 8th inst. affords me peculiar satisfaction by informing me that your wound begins to wear a favorable aspect, & that you are recovered from the disorder in your stomach—The left wing of the army is advanced four miles from this place, & 19 miles from Kings ferry—the other two divisions are moving on after it with proper intervals—the enemy since quitting the Jerseys have...
This will be deliver’d to you by Majr Cabell who goes to Philadelphia in order to Collect & bring forward all the soldiers belonging to this Army who may have gone back to, or remain’d in the City, or its Neighbourhood—You will please give him every Necessary assistance in the Execution of this duty I expect you will find Colo. Heartly’s Regiment with Colo. Proctors sufficient for Garrison...
Your two agreeable favors of the 19 and 22 Ulto came to hand, which I now have to acknowledge. I am very happy to learn that your wounds are less painful and in so fair a way of doing well—the only drawback in the pleasure [I] receive is that the condition of your wounds is ⟨s⟩till such as not to admit of your active services this campaign. You will rest assured that I wish to see you in a...
I have been favd with yours of the 30th ulto inclosing a return of the Troops in the City and of the Officers. All those of Pennsylvania had leave of Absence for a particular reason, and may therefore remain untill further orders. Those from other States, (Lt Colo. parke in particular) should be ordered to join their Corps, except they can make it appear that they are upon Business. I would...
I was favoured with your letter of the 11th Instant. I am sorry at the destruction of property at Egg harbour—but in attending to the general objects of war, we must at times submit to such losses, or depend on the exertions of the militia for their prevention. No doubt you have been informed of the progress of the enemy’s embarkation at New-York—The 19 & 20th Inst. about 150 sail of vessels,...
Letter not found: to Benedict Arnold, 13 Nov. 1778. On 20 Nov., Arnold acknowledged “Your Excellencys favor of the 13th Inst., by General Du Portail.”
Upon my arrival here I found your favor of the 5th: Your own letter communicated the first hint that I ever recd of any representations or reports made by the Board of War to Congress respecting you or your command in Philada. The Board some little time ago applied to me for a Regiment or two to be stationed at Philada and Trenton to do the Town Duties and guard the Stores, alledging that the...
General Smallwood informs me that Capt. Winder with about 100 Men of the 1st Maryld Brigade is detained in Philada to do Garrison duty. The line has been so weakened by the expiration of the service of a number of the draughts and by necessary detachments that it is impossible the Men above mentioned can be spared for that duty, I must therefore request you to give Capt. Winder orders to march...
I have your favr of . I have, in obedience to the Resolve of Congress, ordered a Court Martial to sit at this place on the 1st May, to try you on the 1st 2d 3d and 5th Charges exhibited against you by the Council of the State of Pennsylvania. It would have given me great pleasure to have endulged you with a Court at Philada but such is the weak state of the line in respect to General and Feild...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] April 26, 1779 . Announces postponement of Arnold’s trial. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Arnold was in Philadelphia at this time waiting to be tried for his “Conduct … during his command in the City of Philada.” See George Washington to Joseph Reed, February 9, 1779 ( GW John C. Fitzpatrick, ed., The Writings of George...
I find myself under a necessity of postponing your trial to a later period, than that for which I notified your attendance —I send you this information in a hurry lest you should set out before it might arrive if delayed to an hour of more leisure—In a future letter I shall communicate my reasons and inform you of the time which shall be finally appoin⟨ted⟩. I am Dr Sir Your most Obed....
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] April 28, 1779 . Explains why Arnold’s trial has been postponed. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I informed you in a short line of the 26th that your trial was postponed, with a promise to explain the reason at another opportunity. I had received a letter from the Council, representing that the period appointed for the purpose, and the previous notice given, were too short to admit of the necessary witnesses being produced in time. One of the most material they inform me is in Virginia...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 7, 1779 . Announces that date of Arnold’s trial is June 1, 1779. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have the pleasure to inform you that the time of your trial is now finally fixed on the first day of June. If something very extraordinary does not intervene to prevent it, it will certainly come on then; as I am truly desirous that it may have as speedy a decision, as a regard to propriety will permit. I am Dr Sir with much esteem your most Obedt servant Df , in Alexander Hamilton’s...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 15, 1779 . Explains reasons for delay of Arnold’s trial. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have received your favour of the 5th instant and read it with no small concern. I feel my situation truly delicate and embarrassing—on one side your anxiety, very natural in such circumstances—and the convenience of the army strongly urge me to bring the affair to a speedy conclusion—on the other, the pointed representations of the state on the subject of witnesses, and the impropriety of...
I am sorry to inform You that the Situation of Affairs will not permit a Court Martial to proceed on your Trial at this Time. The Movements of the Enemy make it indispensably necessary, that the Army should at least advance towards the North River, with all practicable Expedition & require that the Officers appointed to compose the Court, should be with the several Commands. The following is A...
I have received your favour of the 13th Instant. The situation of affairs would not permit a Court Martial to sit since you were at Middle Brook. You may be assured it is not my wish to delay your trial a single moment; At the same time you must be sensible, that I cannot fix with precision on any day, during the more active part of the Campaign for it to come on. The movements of the Enemy...
I have to acknowlege your favor of the 6th of this month, and that of the 20th containing a duplicate of the former. In a letter to the Board of Admiralty of the 15th I communicated my sentiments respecting the subject of your letter. I observed to the Board “with respect to the troops, that, from the detatchment lately sent to the Southward, and the great diminution of our force besides,...
Inclosed you have the draught of a proclamation addressed to the inhabitants of Canada. You will be pleased to put this into the hands of a printer whose secrecy and discretion may be depended on and desire him to strike off a proof sheet with the utmost dispatch, which you will send to me for correction. We shall want at least 500 Copies—The importance of this Business will sufficiently...
You are to proceed to West Point and take the command of the Post, and its dependencies—in which are included all from Fish-kill to Kings Ferry, The Corps of Infantry and Cavalry advanced towards the Enemy’s lines on the East side of the River will also be under your orders, and will take directions from you, and you will endeavour to obtain every intelligence of the Enemy’s motions. The...
Inclosed is a letter which I recd this day from Colo. Malcom. His observations may perhaps be of use to you. He was a considerable time in command at the post, and is well acquainted with what relates to its security. It will be well to make inquiry into the cases of the number of prisoners who are confined in the Fort. Some of them may have been committed upon frivolous occasions, and no...
Colo. Kosciusko having permission to join the southern Army—Major Villefranche has directions to repair to West point and take upon him the superintendance of the Works. You will, I am persuaded, find this Gentleman fully acquainted with his Business, and I doubt not but he will give general satisfaction to those with whom he will be immediately concerned in the execution of the Works. I am...