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A Declaration to be made by the President That the sales of lots of public property in the town of Washington shall never be extended so far but that there shall remain and be reserved so many of the said lots unsold as shall at the rate of 100. Doll. per lot be sufficient to secure the proportion of this loan not yet reimbursed, of which lots two fifths shall be South of an East and West line...
Articles of Agreement made and entered into this tenth day of October Anno domini 1795 by and between George Washington, President of the United States, on the one part, and John C. Elhler late of Germany, but now residing at Mount Vernon on the other part, Witness—That for and in consideration of the wages & allowances herein after mentioned, the said John C. Ehler doth promise and agree to...
Articles of Agreement made and enterd into this ninth day of November Anno Domini one thousand seven hundred and ninety between Thomas Green Joiner & House Carpenter of the one part and George A. Washington for and in behalf of the President of the United States on the other part Witnesseth that the said Thomas Green for the wages and other considerations hereinafter expressed doth agree and...
It is greatly to be lamented, for the sake of humanity, that the flame of War, which had before spread over a considerable part of Europe has within the present year extended itself much further; implicating all those powers with whom the United States have the most extensive relations. When it was seen here, that almost all the maritime Nations either were, or were likely soon to become...
An act making allowances for certain services & contingencies in the collection of the Revenue during the year ending on the 30 day of June 1792. Whereas it has been found necessary to provide a compensation for the legal admeasurement of Stills during the year ending on the 30 day of June 1792. it is hereby established & declared, that there may & shall be allowed to the Collectors of the...
Proclamation By George Washington President of the UStates Amidst the calamities which afflict so many other nations [and trouble the sources of individual quiet security and happiness,] the present condition of the UStates affords much matter of consolation and satisfaction. Our exemption hitherto from the evils of foreign war, an increasing prospect of the continuance of that precious...
I trust, I do not deceive myself, while I indulge the persuasion, that I have never met you at any period, when more than at the present, the situa⟨tion⟩ of our public affairs has afforded just cause for mutual congratulation and for inviting you to join with me in profound gratitude to the Author of all Good for the numerous and signal blessings we enjoy. The Termination of the long expensive...
At a Meeting at the Presidents House City of Philadelphia Aug 24. 1794 Present The President of The United States. The Secretary of State The Secretary of the Treasury. The President proposed for the opinion and advice of The Secretary of State & the Secretary of the Treasury the following questions. 1   Shall orders issue for the immediate convening of the whole or any part of the Militia...
1   Object. The public Debt is greater than we can possibly pay before other causes of adding to it will occur; and this has been artificially created by adding together the whole amount of the Debtor and Creditor sides of the Account. Answer. The public Debt was produced by the late war. It is not the fault of the present government that it exists; unless it can be proved, that public...
In my speech to the two houses of Congress at the opening of the session I urged the expediency of being prepared for war as one of the best securities to our peace. Events which seem dayly to be unfolding themselves press still more seriously upon us the duty of being so prepared, indicating that the calamities of war may by a train of circumstances be forced upon us, notwithstanding the most...