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Your Letter of the 21st. of Novr. being forwarded under cover to William at New York, remained some time with him and was not addressed to me here, untill I informed him that I should not proceed to Washington, but pause the decission of the House, on the pretentions of Doctor Willoughby, Knowing the complection of the majority and their political biass, I concluded, I would save myself the...
Being thus particular, in designating my position I think my friends at Quincy will not hereafter be at a loss where to address their pleasant letters to me, I am induced to be thus minute, by a remark in your letter of the 18th. of november, which I was delighted to receive,—wherein you say, you had contemplated writing to me for some time previous to the receipt of my Letters to The...
I wrote you on the 24th. ulto. and sent a copy of Hamiltons Letter to Miranda as requested in yours of the 4th. of april last; you will find in the Annual Register, or Review of Politics and Literature for the year 1807 page 45 a note relative to the interest the British Government took in Mirandas Expedition, and in page 206. 7. 8 & 9 the account of his visit to Coro. in page 392 you will...
In your last letter from Quincy of April 4th. you wished I would furnish you with a Copy of Hamiltons Letter to Miranda and asked in what Journal, Magazine, Review or Newspaper it s deposited—At the time, I could only furnish Mirandas Letter to Hamilton, since my return home I have found among my books a Vol entitled South American emancipation a London edition By J.M. Antipara, a Native of...
My son William Steuben Smith Secretary of Legation to the Court of Russia, having with the approbation of the Secretary of State returned to America on a visit to his family, with permission to return to Europe should it be agreable to him, I have the honor to state, that being nearly six years absent from his family and friends, it is not his wish to revisit Europe again, in the capacity of...
I am honoured with your letter of the 4th. inst., I am sorry your friends work you so hard—I will endeavour in the course of the season to visit Quincy, and promise to copy all your letters during my stay, the perusal of them will richly pay me for the trouble. I have a letter from my Brother Justus from the valley, mentioning, that our Brother James is very ill; from the nature of his spring...
I receive with great satisfaction your congratulations on the peace, dated the 22d. ulto. the day of the great rejoicings in Boston, I have noticed the detail of the processions, and ceremonies, they must have been great indeed—The Bostonians have always been remarked, as doing things upon a great Scale. I suppose you did not see, the regular confusion, or hear the enthusiastic shouts of the...
I received your kind letter of the 22d. of Feby. this morning—I have the pleasure to inform you of the restoration of my health—Congress will adjourn of course on Friday next—the roads are intollerably bad I have my horse and Sulkey with me, and after the roads get a little settled, I shall travel on gently to new york, and perhaps to the Valley—an extra meeting of Congress will take place,...
I have the pleasure to inform you that the President sent the nomination to the senate yesterday of John Quincy Adams as Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of Great Britain— I am Well thank God— Yours Sincerely, MHi : Adams Papers.
you and your dear family may have wondered at my silence for some weeks past, but I have been very, seriously indisposed, this I have not communicated to my Children at Newyork nor to our family at the Valley or Utica, it could only tend to excite painful sensations to them, therefore I have been silent—It is of course a satisfaction to me, to state to you, that I feel as if, I had perfectly...
I received your letter enclosing one addressed to Mr. Adams, and presented it to the Secretary of State it will be forwarded with the public dispatches to Gent. I do not admire Williams return at this moment, having recieved his Commission as Secretary of the Legation, I think he had better hold it, and remain abroad for the present—least he should be on his Way I stated to Mr. Monroe, as he...
The Vice President of The United States is Dead . He Presided in the Senate yesterday, with his usual appearance of Health; this morning took breakfast, and went in a Hack to the Treasury department, after finishing the business which called him there, he observed to Mr. Nourse, that he did not feel well Mr. Nourse attended him to the carriage & he ordered the Driver to carry him to the...
On Saturday the 5th. I received your Letter of the 28th. ulto: the introduction you have given to the Revd. Edward Everet, when presented will be received to the full extent of his most sanguine expectations, I love the introduction of Worthy Characters from those I love and esteem— That the communications from our dear Caroline to you are satisfactory, is highly gratifying to me, and that we...
When I was in the woods, I could write you freely, and venture my opinions upon men, measures and passing scenes; but now, on the plains of the District of Columbia, I pause, hesitate; and gazing on the political confused aspect feel a diffidence in putting my calculations & conjectures on paper, I dare not state even to you, what my impressions are, least they should produce a pang in your...
I have your letter of the 1st. inst. and yesterday visited Mr. Hellen & his family, they are all well and received no injury from the late invasion, they all however retired into the Country for a few day’s under great terror, the enemy however did not approach their house nearer than the Palace, distant about one mile—I enclose the report of the naval Committee expressive of the gallant...
I have your Letter of the 12th. inst, I lament that the delay of my answers should have excited unpleasant sensations, the circumstances from whence it sprung, were out of my controul— They however furnished the young Gentleman with an opportunity of expressing his solicitude, and has finally thus far progressed as you express yourself to your satisfaction, and that it does so, adds to my...
I have your letter of the 22d. of march, and am much gratified that my enquiries and communications relative to Mr. De Wint meet wit your approbation—you will no doubt observe by my last letter to my dear Caroline, that ultimately my Ideas fully correspond with your own, and thinking that I was hard with the young man, I softened my letter, and withdrew from that stern position that I had...
Yesterday mr. Eppes chairman of the Committee of Way’s and means, brought in a bill to change the mode of taxation from the capacity of Stills to the quantity distilled eight Cents pr. Gallon on Spirits distilled from domestick materials and 12 Cents on spirits from foreign materials I think this will create serious debates amongst the leaders of the majority, it is supposed this change will...
The restrictive System is raised and The President this day recommended to The two Houses of Congress to raise the Embargo—The communication was refered to The Committee of foreign relations, who will report to-morrow—The Papers of tomorrow will fully inform you, and I will forward them by the post of the 2d. of april— To make comments to you must be Superfluous, I mark the aspect of the...
I have forwarded to you The Report of the Department of war on the subject of our military force the past Campaign I now enclose you Documents from The Secretary of the navy, relating to the navy of the United States—both of which will put you in full possession of the present real state of these two important departments, of course will be thus far satisfactory to you—The House have been for...
Your Letter of the 2d. instant contains so many weighty and important questions relative to the jaring points of negotiation in the interior of Europe, that I cannot see how they are to be adjusted and settled You take a wider range and a more expanded view of the immense questions, then I conjecture, has crossed the minds of our political seavans , for myself, from the pictures you hold up, I...
I have your Letter of the 2d. inst. one from My dear Caroline of the 28th. of Febry. and one from my son John of the first and one from Mr. DeWint of the 2d. inst. all of which I have answered, the majority however goes by this post— The subject is highly interesting I have promptly answered Caroline, my Son and Mr. De Wint— I wrote a note to The Hon ble : Mr. Oakley a member in Congress from...
Yesterday at 1/2 past 5. P.M. The Bill authorising a loan of twenty five Millions of Dollars, passed the House of Representatives by a Majority of forty two—It has been a Subject of animated debate for twenty day’s—it now of course, passed to the Senate, It is not expected that it will long rest there— The Papers which I forward and those you receive thro’ other channels, put you regularly in...
I received yesterday a Letter from my dear Caroline of the 20th. inst. informing me of the better health of yourself and M rs. Adams, of which, of course I was happy to be informed Heaven grant you both a perfect restoration, and that you may continue a blessing to society and a comfort to your family and friends—The removal of Mr. Granger produces a considerable sensation—and the proposed...
More trouble hangs over the Camp The President last night, indulged The Secretary of War, by consenting to the arrest of Major General Wilkinson—The Court martial is detailed, and dispatches with an official arrest were this morning, sent off from the War office, to the Army of the North—somebody must be sacrificed to cover the blunders of the War— Yours respectfully, MHi : Adams Papers.
This day’s Post brings a communication from Abbey under date of the 13th. from a Gentleman of very high standing of from which the following is an extract— “General Hulls trial will be terminated in a few day’s, the evidence on the part of the prosecution have closed, The Unfortunate Old man, will have but a slender Defence, the Court must I think sentence him to be shot, the state of the Army...
I enclose you the United States Gazette to you perfectly acquainted with the Geography of Europe particularly of the frontiers of france, Spain, the borders of the Rhine, and the formerly united Provinces of Holland the details of military movements, may amuse you and perhaps produce some observations, instructive to me. I must acknowledge myself somewhat perplexed in my calculations, on past...
It is here a profound secreet of the Cabinet, known only to seven— You may rely upon it a negotiation will be promptly entered into to restore peace between the united States and Great Britain The British Administration, decline the mediation of Russia, but will appoint ministers to negotiate with the American ministers, and express their confidence that all matters, between the two nations,...
I have your letter of the 15th. inst., the aspect of public affairs become every day more gloomy The slap which I predicted before I left you has been realized, I expected it from the dividing of our force, and knowing that Govr. Provost as an officer, would try a battle of manævre, previous to our troops taking too imposing a position, he tried it and it put a period to the Campaign—The enemy...
I have your letter of the 16th I hasten to ansr. it as I have by the same post receivd a Letter from our dear Caroline from Schnectady giving an account of the safe arrival of the Party there in improved health they go on to Ballstown to try the Springs & from thence proceed to Quincy; where I now have no doubt but they will arrive safe—I have addressd the paper of the day to Caroline by which...