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Your benevolence I know will excuse the particularity of this address, when you confide in the assurance of its proceeding from a sincere heart nourishing the most exalted sentiments of the virtue and sensibility of yours. Accept of my thanks for the reply to my note, I feel myself complimented by your confidence and beleive I am not capable of abusing it. I hope for an advocate in you, should...
The three Letters which Mrs. Adams honoured me with were received at Paris, and should have been answered, had an oppertunity offered. Permit me to pass an encomium on that prudence which dictates silence on painful Subjects, and to assure her while honour guides my actions and is my ruling star thro’ Life—I shall alway’s endeavour to appear as if I had taken the deepest draught from the...
An anxiety to preserve a consistancy of Character in the opinion of Mrs. Adams (in whose favourable sentiments I feel myself more and more interested) induces me to say, that I have some reason to believe, that the late Connection, which appeared an insurmountable Obstacle to the accomplishment of the Wish nearest my heart—exists no longer. And from the opinion I have of the Lady, I am...
We were pleased by the receipt of yours of the 5th. inst. from Harwich, to find that your jaunt to that period and place had proved so agreable, you have our earnest wishes for its continuance. But we have been apprehensive since, that the fine Sun and fair Brieze which invited you on board in the morning, forsook you before, you had crossed the Channel. At this place, the after part of the...
I dare say, my friend, when you receive this, you will think I have moved with great rapidity. There have but two things occurred on the road which are worth mentioning; the one is my having met Mr. Rucker; we stopped, jumped out of our carriages, I into the dust, and he out of it; he had a great coat on, and his beard he brought from Paris with him; I wonder how it passed the custom-house...
I have recived your agreable Letter of the 5 th. of may and am much obliged for it, at the same time I had the happiness of getting one from my dear Abby I ask your pardon Nabby you like best and when I am acquainted with what will give my friends pleasure— I shall alway’s attend even to the minutest particle—therefore to you Nabby is the word—Amelia to herself—my daughter for Sir—& for myself...
I was much pleased this morning by the receipt of yours of May 19th. Look at the dates—May 5th, Paris, and Blois, May 11th—the places are very distant, and it is impossible to write in a chariot going post. I have answered your mamma’s letter from this place; I have not gone through the necessary visits to the royal family, but they are nearly finished. I find everything here much more...
I wrote you, my love, the first thing I did after my landing here on the 20th; I then proposed setting off from this, yesterday or this morning; but I am in check . I was yesterday at 4 o’clock, visited by an ague and fever, which shook and warmed me alternately pretty tolerably; this day I am free from it, and with the advice of a very good doctor who attends me, I hope soon to be allowed to...
I have been honoured by the receipt of your friendly Letter of July the 16 th . I supposed, that on your arrival, various matters would necessarily engage your attention; we sensibly feel for the indisposition of our good Mama, and wish she was near us, that we might each take care of a finger,— previous to our being informed of these reasons of silence, we concluded, that there was some...
It is with particular pleasure I communicate to you the joyfull news of M rs: Smiths safe delivery of a Son, which took place between seven & eight the last Evening, she was not the least indisposed untill six o’Clock & by ½ past seven all was well & tranquil, both continue composed and easy, but Nabby desires me to tell you that she is much disappointed, she had made the things, to adorn a...
M r: Bourne has this moment waited upon me and informs, that he has been honoured by the senate with the appointment of being the Bearer of their Dispatches to you, relative to your election as Vice President of the Western Empire, upon which please to accept of my affectionate congratulations and of my sincere prayers that Heaven may guide and protect you in this great Career— The Virtuous...
I have the happiness of informing you that M rs: Smith and the Boys are in high health and that your presence here as soon as you can possibly make it convenient will be very agreable and is in a great degree necessary— M r. A has taken a House about one mile from the City as he has informed you, and in his Letters has said something about the removal of furniture— on this subject permit me to...
I should have long before this answered your affectionate Letter of Congratulation on my return to my family and friends but since my arrival, I have really been so perfectly and fully engaged, that I could scarcly call an hour my own— I had hurried myself for this week past in expectation of attending M rs: Smith to Braintree, but the situation of my public and private business tho’ agreable...
The information I gave you relative to M r. Hammonds official Character at the moment of your departure for Philadelphia, you will probably have confirmed previous to the receipt of this— The various important stations I have filled and the particular agency I had in producing this conciliatory advance of the British Court to the Government of The United States, Justifies to my mind the offer...
M r. Bond delivered your Letter of the 20 th. of april I should have answered it sooner, but I really have been so much occupied in my private affairs, that I have scarcely had time to attend to any of my Correspondents out of the line of real business—but I now have a pretty clear prospect of getting well thro’ the great points I embraced— I shall however, I find, make more reputation than...
M rs: Smith has shewn me the Letter you wrote on the 2 d. ins t. with the Copies of those you presented to The Count D e Vergennes The extract from Brissots Journal I noticed, and really think there is a greater combination to deprive you of the tribute due to your services, than I ever noticed pointed against any Individual— I think it a duty you owe yourself and Country, to resist it, & this...
I have received the letter you did me the honor to write under date of the 16 th. ins t. —and am content that the communication I thought it my duty to make, has been received—and am also satisfied that it is not new to The President— The report that on my visit to Detroit, I gave out, that I was sent by The President, for ends of Government of some sort or other— is utterly and totally false...
It would be singular indeed, were I to permit your friendly note of March 9 th. to pass unanswered, and not to thank you for forwarding the letter from the west-ward, which accompanied it, I should not have taken the liberty of desiring my correspondents to have addressed letters to me, to the care of the Presidents secretary, had I not experienced the basest treatment thro’ the line of the...
The request I am going to make, will perhaps at the first blush appear singular—this you’ll excuse—If improper—I shall ever acknowledge myself obliged by being candidly told so—and in this, as well as in every other matter, I will chearfully give way to your superior judgement, and regulate my conduct by your advice, as far as you think proper to honour me with it. If there is a probability of...
I did myself the honour of writing you from Harwich and Amsterdam— we have been very unfortunate as to roads & weather and were not able to reach Bresleau, time enough for the Review there— those of this place and at Potsdam will be finished about the 20 th. when I shall attempt a rapid passage to London by the way of Paris, I shudder at the Idea of tresspassing too far upon your indulgence—...
MS not found. Printed from facsimile in WSS ’s hand in Magazine of American History, with Notes and Queries , [1879], 3:44–45; addressed: “His Excellency John Adams, &c., &c., &c., corner Brooks Street, Grosvenor Square.” The signatures were written in a circle and attached on a separate foldout page. The address was provided only in the Magazine article’s text. Published as “A Diplomatic...
One among our many follies Was calling in for Steaks at Dolly’s Whereby we’ve lost—& feel like Sinners That we have miss’d much better dinners Nor do we think that us ‘tis hard on Most humbly thus to beg your pardon And promise that another time We’ll give our reason not our rhime So we’ve agreed—our Nem: Con: vote is That we thus early jointly give you notice For as our rule is to be clever...
I am under the disagreeable necessity of informing you that Mr: Barclay is in Prison at this place at the suit of Messrs V & P French & Nephew, Merchants Established here, for the Sum of 75.000 Livers—which arises from Cash advanced & Goods Shiped on his account & by his order—near 4 years past—the Gentlemen seem much attached to the Idea, that Mr. Barclay, being in a public capacity—his...
By my Several Letters to Mrs: Smith since my departure your Excellency will have been regularly informed of my progress and the cause of my checks at Paris & Bordeaux and the reason of the length of my Stay here, which I doubt not will prove Satisfactory—I shall proceed on Tuesday to compleat my Journey to Lisbon, from whence if an opportunity offers I shall communicate to Mr. Jay my progress...
The advances which I was under the necessity of making preparitory to my Journey, & the most extraordinary expences necessarily attending a Journey thro’ Spain & Portugal, together with my expences at this Court, increased by a Severe indisposition, has rendered it necessary for me to draw on your Excellency for one hundred pounds strg. at 30 day’s Sight, you will please to place it to account...
I accidently encountered Mr: Kissam the young Gentleman who came passenger in the last Packet from New York, he having dispatches addressed to you from Mr. Jay, I opened them with an intention if I found anything in them which might be necessary for you to be immediately acquainted with, to have been the bearer of them to Portsmouth but finding they only contained letters of recall dated New...
I had the Pleasure of receiving your letter of the 10th. inst. the last evening, and should have done myself the Honour of meeting You at New Rochelle this day were I not kept in check by Mr: Jay’s proposing that if I would wait untill the morning he would accompany me to meet you at Kings Bridge, where we suppose you will be at 12 o.Clock— The Arrangements for your accomodation and that of...
Permit me to introduce to your acquaintance Mr. Blodget, tho’ I believe you may recollect seeing him in London—he will present himself to the President being charged with the prosecution of a plan relative to the building of the fœderal City, he is a young man of great property and supported in his project by most undoubted security, he will if you give him an oppertunity communicate his...
I take the liberty of introducing to your acquaintance the Bearer of this, Mr. Wm: Langworthy, Author of a much approved work entitled "an Attempt to promote the Commercial interest of Great Britain,” a Copy of which, I believe he presented you with he is a Gent. of Science and abilities, who has been invited to this Country, as a proper theatre for the exercise of his talents and who lately...
I have been this day Honoured with your very obliging Letter of the 17th. when I had about half finished the enclosed Letter to the secretary at War in answer to the one alluded to in yours— It gives me pain to learn, that I have from Circumstances inherent in my nature been the cause of anxiety to you. If it were in my power to correct them, I would readily do it, but the fault is in my stars...
The Bearer Mr. Mariner, is the son of Capt. Mariner at Rye, whose services during the last war, I took a pleasure in relating to you, and observed that our Country could not boast of a more enterprising and trust-worthy officer, This Gentleman has lately returned from sea and having spent the whole of his early Life in that service, presents himself to The President as a Candidate for a...
I received the enclosed papers yesterday, the importance of their contents, induces me to forward them without loss of time, particularly as Mr. Shaw had told me, when here, that it was understood from the secretary of War, that the Indian Chiefs left Philadelphia perfectly satisfied, these papers will prove to you, that they were highly irritated, they have arrived some time, at Detroit, and...
I have received your letter of the 24th, this day, the after part of which has been taken up in the reception of the 13th regiment into our camp. The scene was brilliant, and attended by the whole of the inhabitants of the adjacent country. It is now over; and after giving a welcome in my tent to the officers and respectable inhabitants, and it being 10 o’clock at night, I compose myself to...
I had the pleasure, my dear, of receiving your favour of the 20th yesterday. You say you often think of me, enduring, as I must, many hardships and inconveniences; they are, however, hardships and inconveniences which scarce deserve regard, relating only to the person; the pains which really incommode, are in the mind, occasioned by delays in the supply of the necessary materials. I have been...
I have the pleasure to inform you that I struck my marquée on the 19th, and took shelter in my hut, which is yet without doors to it, but much more comfortable than the tent. The last night I slept in the tent, a bottle of wine, standing on the table, froze through, but still I was not uncomfortable. It will be some time before I can have the pleasure to announce to you, that the hut is...
I received yours of the 19th this afternoon, and yesterday received orders from General Hamilton to prepare for the funeral rites of our departed General, on Thursday next. I have put every thing in the necessary train of execution, preparative to the reception of his final orders, which I expect to receive in the course of the night; and last night I determined to erect a monument to his...
We attended yesterday the funeral honours, paid to the great , the illustrious General, George Washington, at the military station of the Union Brigade, consisting of the 11th, 12th, and 13th regiments of infantry, under the command of William S. Smith, Lieutenant Colonel of the 12th. The solemnities of the day were introduced at the réveillé drum, by the discharge of sixteen rounds, from the...
I have not had the pleasure of a line from you since the 28th of December, which I attribute, however, to the difficulties in crossing the Delaware. I have seen General Lee’s oration, as it is called. It is a plain story, plainly told, for a funeral narrative; and will hereafter be read with that apathy which seemed to have overshadowed the author. The great Adjutant General cries out for...
I am, my dear, here at General White’s in company with Mrs. and Judge Cushing, Mrs., Miss, and Judge Paterson, &c. I thank you for your letter, and am of course pleased with the dignified majority in the House of Representatives. Be it known, we are not building a dancing room; be it known I have not built an elegant hut. I should not have gratified my feelings relative to you had I not made...
I have the Honor to inform you that agreably to your Proclamation, of the 6th. of January, recommending to the People of The United States to assemble on the 22d. day of Feby. in such numbers and manner as might be convenient publickly to testify their grief for the Death of General George Washington, by suitable Eulogies, Orations and discourses, or by public Prayer— that the Union Brigade...
I have been honoured by your Letter of the 18th—I have noticed its Contents, I consent to your wishes, and I will smother my own, if my heart cracks—My Idea of happiness rests on the ability properly exercised—to promote the happiness of others, whenever I am furnished with this ability I exercise it, and consider myself obliged by the oportunity, I have written to Mrs. Smith, & you will...
Permit me to introduce to you my particular friend Mr. Hardy of newyork, he visits Philadelphia, as a Candidate for public office—highly recommended—I have broke in upon my general rule and have taken the Liberty to give him a Letter to The President to which permit me to refer you, Mr. Hardy’s merits as an officer, and Conduct as a Gentleman, entitle him to civilities and attention. permit me...
I have received your letter, by the Paymaster, of the 12th. I see your embarrassments, and if I were not prominent to relieve you from them, I should forfeit my charter— the roads are bad, the season is inclement, the Delaware is almost impassable—your mamma cannot bear to part with you, and the President does not know how to let C—— go . These are truths which nobody can deny. I will continue...
Mrs: Smith is playing with Caroline and having wrote yesterday, says I must introduce The Bearer—Brigade Major Coxe of the 12th. Regt. to the drawing room—he visits Philadelphia on Furlough, proposing to spend a few day’s there, Should he be there on a drawing room, day, permit his admittance, and be pleased to let Mr. Shaw to be attentive to him for the sake of his gout . he is entitled to...
I have the Honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Letter of the 30th. I am much gratified that the proceedings of this Brigade meets with your approbation, I hope it will be entitled to your good opinion and wishes to the end of its military Career—my assiduities and pointed attention shall not be wanting— I have daily causes of exultation, and am very frequently complimented, By The...
The brigade, which as Lieut. Col. commandant, I have had the honor to command, being on the point of dismissal, I take the liberty of suggesting, that the officers & soldiers are well instructed in the duties of their profession, & it would be of great public benefit, if as many of them, as might be requisite, should be taken to fill up the corps, government have concluded to retain in...
Inclosed I have the Honor of Submitting two General Orders, that of the 22d. will shew, that I have fully discharged the duties of my military Station, and I once more retire from Service with applause—The other of the 31st. orders me to remain and continue to make and carry into effect such ulterior arrangements as may be necessary untill further orders. It appears to me, it would have the...
I have been honoured by the receipt of your letter enclosing a Copy of one from the Secretary of War, I am fully convinced he is in error—as it relates to myself I am content, but as it relates to the President I am not—The senate & House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled pass an Act to provide an additional regiment of artillerists and Engineers. The...
I am at present much occupied in closing the military scene here, I shall effect it fully on the 14th. conformable to the wishes of Government—there is every appearance of its being closed with military propriety— concluding the perusal of the enclosed would give you pleasure, I transmit it—it might perhaps not be amiss to put it in one of the Boston papers.— Mrs: Smith and Caroline are well...
I have the Honor to inform you, that the Union Brigade which consisted of the 11th. 12th. & 13th. Regts. of Infantry, are agreable to your orders disbanded—They have retired from Service, with a dignity becoming Soldiers, in the service of a free and enlight’ned People— There retirement from the field has been without confusion, Disturbance or riot, and meets with the applause of the adjacent...