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I have the happiness of informing you that M rs: Smith and the Boys are in high health and that your presence here as soon as you can possibly make it convenient will be very agreable and is in a great degree necessary— M r. A has taken a House about one mile from the City as he has informed you, and in his Letters has said something about the removal of furniture— on this subject permit me to...
I should have long before this answered your affectionate Letter of Congratulation on my return to my family and friends but since my arrival, I have really been so perfectly and fully engaged, that I could scarcly call an hour my own— I had hurried myself for this week past in expectation of attending M rs: Smith to Braintree, but the situation of my public and private business tho’ agreable...
The information I gave you relative to M r. Hammonds official Character at the moment of your departure for Philadelphia, you will probably have confirmed previous to the receipt of this— The various important stations I have filled and the particular agency I had in producing this conciliatory advance of the British Court to the Government of The United States, Justifies to my mind the offer...
M r. Bond delivered your Letter of the 20 th. of april I should have answered it sooner, but I really have been so much occupied in my private affairs, that I have scarcely had time to attend to any of my Correspondents out of the line of real business—but I now have a pretty clear prospect of getting well thro’ the great points I embraced— I shall however, I find, make more reputation than...
M rs: Smith has shewn me the Letter you wrote on the 2 d. ins t. with the Copies of those you presented to The Count D e Vergennes The extract from Brissots Journal I noticed, and really think there is a greater combination to deprive you of the tribute due to your services, than I ever noticed pointed against any Individual— I think it a duty you owe yourself and Country, to resist it, & this...
Permit me to introduce to your acquaintance Mr. Blodget, tho’ I believe you may recollect seeing him in London—he will present himself to the President being charged with the prosecution of a plan relative to the building of the fœderal City, he is a young man of great property and supported in his project by most undoubted security, he will if you give him an oppertunity communicate his...
I take the liberty of introducing to your acquaintance the Bearer of this, Mr. Wm: Langworthy, Author of a much approved work entitled "an Attempt to promote the Commercial interest of Great Britain,” a Copy of which, I believe he presented you with he is a Gent. of Science and abilities, who has been invited to this Country, as a proper theatre for the exercise of his talents and who lately...
[ Philadelphia, February 28, 1793. The account of a cabinet meeting on March 2, 1793, reads: “The President communicated to the Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War and the Attorney General of the United States, a letter from William S. Smith Esqr. of the 28th of February past, to the Secretary of the Treasury.” Letter not found. ] Smith, who was John Adams’s...
[ Philadelphia, March 2, 1793. According to an entry in JPP “Journal of the Proceedings of the President,” George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. for March 2, 1793, Hamilton submitted to the President “a letter from Colo. W. S. Smith of this date respecting the debt of the U.S. to France —with a Copy of a letter wh. he had written to Mr. Ternant on the subject —and an Extract of a...
[ November 10, 1794. On November 12, 1794, Oliver Wolcott, Jr., wrote to Smith: “Your letter of the 10th. instant covering a Contract dated the 10th. day of Oct. 1794 has in the absence of the Secretary of the Treasury been read by me.” Letter not found. ] Smith, John Adams’s son-in-law, had been supervisor of the revenue for the District of New York from 1791 to 1793. When this letter was...
I flatter myself you will put a proper Construction upon my silence hitherto, and rather attribute it to a real diffidence which my mind is impressed with relative to the subject upon which I am now about to address you, than to any want of respect or the least disposition to attempt the attainment of an appointment under the present Government, thro any other medium than your influence &...
It becomes my duty to state to the President, that when I visited England the last winter, I noticed a very great change in the Public opinion, relative to the situation of affairs of my country, since I had the honor of residing their in a Public capacity, and in every company found the subject dwelt on in a flattering manner, except in one or two cases—when Merchants who had experienced...
The arrival of Mr Hammond and the Objects of his Visit to America, will doubtless be made Known and explained to The President, previous to the receipt of this Letter. I cannot refrain from expressing my satisfaction on this Subject, as it fully proves the solidity of some points which I had the honor of stating in my Letter of the 6th of June last—If I can without presumption claim any merit...
When I had the honor of addressing a Letter to The President, last, it was dictated by the necessity I was then under of retiring from public employment—in which I took the liberty of observing, that I should not discover a disposition to return to it, under the then administration. without entering into a detail of the Circumstances which produced that decission, on my part, I shall observe,...
I have the honor of informing you of my arrival last night from England in the Portland Packett, which sailed from Falmouth on the 23d. of Decr., and shall take the earliest opportunity that my private affairs will allow, to present myself to you at Philadelphia, not doubting but it will be satisfactory, to have a detail of the present political State of Europe, from one who has been...