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I had the Pleasure of receiving your letter of the 10th. inst. the last evening, and should have done myself the Honour of meeting You at New Rochelle this day were I not kept in check by Mr: Jay’s proposing that if I would wait untill the morning he would accompany me to meet you at Kings Bridge, where we suppose you will be at 12 o.Clock— The Arrangements for your accomodation and that of...
M r: Bourne has this moment waited upon me and informs, that he has been honoured by the senate with the appointment of being the Bearer of their Dispatches to you, relative to your election as Vice President of the Western Empire, upon which please to accept of my affectionate congratulations and of my sincere prayers that Heaven may guide and protect you in this great Career— The Virtuous...
I am really ashamed of myself for the total silence I have observed since my arrival in America, and am at a loss to account for it, excepting that the affairs of our Country have been in such a situation as scarcely to admit of a Letter’s being sent across the Atlantic, which touched upon their present state or future prospects. But now we are advancing to greater regularity and the period...
It is with particular pleasure I communicate to you the joyfull news of M rs: Smiths safe delivery of a Son, which took place between seven & eight the last Evening, she was not the least indisposed untill six o’Clock & by ½ past seven all was well & tranquil, both continue composed and easy, but Nabby desires me to tell you that she is much disappointed, she had made the things, to adorn a...
I have been honoured by the receipt of your friendly Letter of July the 16 th . I supposed, that on your arrival, various matters would necessarily engage your attention; we sensibly feel for the indisposition of our good Mama, and wish she was near us, that we might each take care of a finger,— previous to our being informed of these reasons of silence, we concluded, that there was some...
Letter not found: from William Stephens Smith, 1 Aug. 1788. GW wrote Smith on 30 Aug. : “I was favoured, a few days ago, with your letter, dated the first day of this Month.”
I accidently encountered Mr: Kissam the young Gentleman who came passenger in the last Packet from New York, he having dispatches addressed to you from Mr. Jay, I opened them with an intention if I found anything in them which might be necessary for you to be immediately acquainted with, to have been the bearer of them to Portsmouth but finding they only contained letters of recall dated New...
I wrote you last fryday’s post and by Mr. Parker on Saturday. In the former, I find I left out, on the credit side, the 2 pr. of shoes which Mr. Short paid for, amounting to 13/4, which deducted from the £1.10.7 which I make the ballance between us, reduces it to seventeen and three pence. Mr. Adam , setts off this morning for the Hague to take leave in person of their High Mightinesses and...
Calculation and Business only I have received your favour of the 2d. inst. and will attempt to explain the two articles with which I credited you in my account Current of the 3d. of Decr. ulto. The first article ammounting to Liv. 113. is stated by Mr. Short in his letter of the 21. of Novr. 1787 and is composed as follows, viz.  8 ells of double florence at 4. 15. = 38.  0  6 ditto of White...
I wrote by this evenings post and attempted to explain in a satisfactory manner our account. I shall be pleased to be informed that I have succeded, and that every article appears clear to you. You have never yet informed me whether the picture I send you was the one you saw at Bermingham or Brumigum, and whether the price I gave, was anything near what you could have obtained it for, previous...
I have received yours of the 31st. of Decr. ulto. and cannot express my astonishment sufficiently strong at the perusal of the first sentence relative to Mr. Littlepage’s not having delivered my Letter of the 3d. of Decr. I waited upon him with it, and when I gave it him, begged he would be particularly carefull of it as it contained our accounts. He promised, and put it into a small box of...
After sincerely wishing you many happy returns of the season, I take the liberty of introducing Mr. Thomas L. Shippen of Philadelphia. He has many interesting and not a few amiable lines of Character, and promises fair to make a shining and respectable Character. He has sometimes appeared to me rather exposed to step on slippery and dangerous ground and risk his usefulness in future life to...
I wrote you by Mr. Littlepage on the 4th. inst. That Letter contains an account of Cash recieved and disposed of on your account. I do not know whether I have made a just calculation of the Livrs. expended in Paris on my account, but this and every other article is submitted to your alteration. I enclose the reviews of the last Month as both your and Mr. Adams’s Names are mentioned, and have...
I have been honoured by the receipt of your Letter of the 13th. ulto. and notice the alarm of your patriotic spirit, on the subject of the newly proposed project, of a fœdral Constitution. I have read it frequently and with great attention, and tho’ I am a great friend to fœdral Men and fœdral measures, and am decidedly of opinion, that some alterations were necessary, still on the plan...
By introducing the bearer Mr. Daniel Parker (who I think you encountered once at my lodgings in Leicester fields) I have the satisfaction of doing him a favour, and presenting to you a fund of Commercial and political knowledge, which you may draw freely upon during his stay at Paris, without being in the least apprehensive of failure or protest. I have been guilty of this, so frequently,...
Permit me to introduce the Bearer Dr. Walker a young Gentleman from Virginia.—Nothing new has transpired since my last of the 8th. inst.—Amsterdam I have no doubt has surrendered, as letters from there of the 9th. say, that 2 deputies were sent to the Princess, to know what terms she finally required, and authorized to give assurances of the disposition in the people to comply with her wishes...
London, 8 Oct. 1787 . Acknowledges TJ’s letter of 28 Sep. ; would be “much flattered if Congress would join you in opinion relative to the appointment you mention”; agrees “fully respecting the proper conduct which ought to be pursued relative to the Island ”; thinks “it would be fortunate for U.S. if we could see it once fairly entered upon.” Sends copy of John Adams’ letter of 25 Aug. which...
The Bearer Mr. Stewart was an officer in our troops during the war and some time under my immediate command. He proposes returning to America in the French Packet of November. Permit me to introduce him to your Excellency and recommend him to your civilities during his stay at Paris. Any Letters you may commit to his care when he departs for America will be taken care of, and he will be able...
In the first place I must introduce my very particular friend Mr. J. B. Cutting as a Gentleman of genius and merit. There may one or two lines shew themselves, which at first will be rather apt to prejudice against him, at least I was sensible of it, and have not been able to obliterate them from his Countenance and motion, but they are really only superficials. I know you will put them aside....
London, 18 Sep. 1787 . Introduces Benjamin Parker, nephew of Daniel Parker, a student at “Cambridge Colledge in Massachusetts,” who will spend three months in Paris before returning to America; “being hard of hearing … prevents him from seeking society with that goùt which might be expected from his age and situation.” RC ( MHi ); 2 p.; endorsed. Recorded in SJL as received 23 Sep. 1787.
I wrote you, my love, the first thing I did after my landing here on the 20th; I then proposed setting off from this, yesterday or this morning; but I am in check . I was yesterday at 4 o’clock, visited by an ague and fever, which shook and warmed me alternately pretty tolerably; this day I am free from it, and with the advice of a very good doctor who attends me, I hope soon to be allowed to...
The advances which I was under the necessity of making preparitory to my Journey, & the most extraordinary expences necessarily attending a Journey thro’ Spain & Portugal, together with my expences at this Court, increased by a Severe indisposition, has rendered it necessary for me to draw on your Excellency for one hundred pounds strg. at 30 day’s Sight, you will please to place it to account...
I propose embarking in the Packet for Falmouth the day after to-morrow. It is probable I shall be in London in about 18 or 20 day’s. My last Letters from Mrs. Smith inform me that she had received a Letter from General Sullivan addressed to me as follows: Dr. Sir I take the Liberty of enclosing a draught in your own favor upon Govr. Jefferson for 46£. 17. 10s. stgr. payable at 10 day’s sight,...
By my Several Letters to Mrs: Smith since my departure your Excellency will have been regularly informed of my progress and the cause of my checks at Paris & Bordeaux and the reason of the length of my Stay here, which I doubt not will prove Satisfactory—I shall proceed on Tuesday to compleat my Journey to Lisbon, from whence if an opportunity offers I shall communicate to Mr. Jay my progress...
I must most pointedly express my obligation for the Letter of introduction which you forwarded for me to Mr. Carmichael. He has done every thing in his power to make my time pass agreable here. It is with pleasure I observe him perfectly well received in the first Circles of the Court, and think him fully accomplished for a political career. I have been detained here much longer than I...
I was much pleased this morning by the receipt of yours of May 19th. Look at the dates—May 5th, Paris, and Blois, May 11th—the places are very distant, and it is impossible to write in a chariot going post. I have answered your mamma’s letter from this place; I have not gone through the necessary visits to the royal family, but they are nearly finished. I find everything here much more...
I have recived your agreable Letter of the 5 th. of may and am much obliged for it, at the same time I had the happiness of getting one from my dear Abby I ask your pardon Nabby you like best and when I am acquainted with what will give my friends pleasure— I shall alway’s attend even to the minutest particle—therefore to you Nabby is the word—Amelia to herself—my daughter for Sir—& for myself...
I am under the disagreeable necessity of informing you that Mr: Barclay is in Prison at this place at the suit of Messrs V & P French & Nephew, Merchants Established here, for the Sum of 75.000 Livers—which arises from Cash advanced & Goods Shiped on his account & by his order—near 4 years past—the Gentlemen seem much attached to the Idea, that Mr. Barclay, being in a public capacity—his...
Mr. Short having informed you from Paris of my intention of being here about the 14th. and of the prospect of my remaining 2 or 3 day’s, I doubt not but I should have had the pleasure of a line from you had that Letter reached you in time. I shall leave this place in the morning for Madrid, where I should be happy to hear from you. I move by order of Congress to Portugal on temporary business....
I dare say, my friend, when you receive this, you will think I have moved with great rapidity. There have but two things occurred on the road which are worth mentioning; the one is my having met Mr. Rucker; we stopped, jumped out of our carriages, I into the dust, and he out of it; he had a great coat on, and his beard he brought from Paris with him; I wonder how it passed the custom-house...