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    • Short, William
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    • post-Madison Presidency
    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Short, William" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
Results 31-40 of 44 sorted by date (ascending)
Knowing as I do, how every letter adds to the burthen which every mail you I have postponed perhaps longer than I should otherwise have done to have informed you of my arrival here, & to have enquired as to the health & present situation of yourself & your interesting family around you. Owing to the wet season & the state of the roads in consequence thereof, I had a most tedious & disagreeable...
I had this pleasure on the 3 d ult o I do not write this in order to add to the burthen of correspondence with which I know you are already overloaded, but merely to ask you to send me one line by the ministry of one of the young Ladies, that I may know how your health is, what news you have from M r Gilmer, & whether M de d’Epinay arrived safe. I sent her in three divisions by three different...
I have abstained from acknowleging your favor of the 9 th ult o that I might not add to your already too heavy load of correspondence. Your letter however came most opportunely; for it was on the heels of a report which had just reached us the very night before, of your being very ill—Your information as to the imposthume explained the ground of this report, & your relief from it was a great...
I send you the three letters inclosed merely because they are the complement of those I sent in my letter of the 18 th inst. They are much too prolix to insist on your reading them—Burn them therefore by way of despatching if it should best suit you. The idea of sending them to you occurred to me merely because they offered some views on what has now become a mere historical subject; which...
The vol s of Hall arrived safe. I am much pleased that they gave the pleasure which I hoped, to the several readers at Monticello, & only regret that you did not keep this little work. I have learned since my return here that he is the son of the Sir James Hall who was in Paris with a son of Lord Lettish, Lord D. They were both the friends of Dugald Stewart & both inclined to republicanism—If...
I have already had the pleasure of acknowleging & thanking you for your gratifying favor of the 8 th ult o a most clear & instructive exhibition of a subject with which I was of course little acquainted. My letter was of the 19 th of Jan y the last I have written except one of the 8 th inst.— I allow myself to give you the present trouble only on account of the occasion, which induces me to...
Your kind & most acceptable remembrance of the 4 th inst. calls for all my thanks. It gave me the most sincere pleasure to recieve from your hand, the details respecting the University—The first steps are always the most difficult, & these being now made with so much success, I look forward with the most sanguine hope to its future progress. I beg you to be assured that you cannot confer on me...
Your kind letter which I last recieved from you (that of April 4) gave me much & real gratification by the details you were so good as to enter into on the subject of the University—they are indeed the most encouraging. And I beg you to believe that my absence from the State has not had the effect of diminishing in the smallest degree my earnest desire to learn all that is favorable to this...
It is always a great gratification to me to recieve one of your letters. That of Aug: 9. I found here on my return from my summer’s excursion—It gratified me first by informing me that your long confinement had not affected your general health, of which I was very apprehensive, & secondly by the account you give me of the state of the University—That account came here most opportunely—for a...
I cannot too much thank you for your kind letter of the 14 th It gave me great relief from the anxiety I was under on account of reports as to your health & the affairs of the University—To the last, as mere reports, I should have paid no attention, after those which prevailed on the same subject, & without even the shadow of a foundation, some time ago. But the Richmond Enquirer which I see...