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AL : American Philosophical Society Dr: Rush begs leave to inform Dr. Franklin that the members of the Canadian Committee will wait upon him this afternoon at 6 oClock at his own house. Addressed: Dr Franklin The committee was to hear Canadian petitions; its meetings determine the note’s possible dates. See Smith, Letters , IV , 537 n.
ALS : American Philosophical Society I profitted so much by your kindness and conversation while I was abroad that I cannot refuse an Application from a young Student for a letter of introduction to you in order that he may assist in obtaining your Mantle and transporting it to your Native country before you leave our world.— The bearer Dr Saml Griffitts has genius and an insatiable desire for...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The inclosed letter to Mr Coxe is from one of his family.— I have taken the liberty of addressing it to your care. Your conveying it safely to Mr Coxe will Oblige a worthy family, and Sir Your most Hble Servant Addressed: The Honble: / Benjamin Franklin Esqr: / Minister Plenipotentiary / from the / United States at / the Court of Versailles. Endorsed: Dr...
AL : American Philosophical Society Dr Rush’s most respectful compliments to his venerable father, and friend Benjamin Franklin Esqr &c and begs the favor of him to forward the enclosed letters to the persons to whom they are addressed.— He has left one of them open for the Doctors perusal—in which he will see that the good old cause continues to flourish under the auspices of heaven and our...
ALS : University of Pennsylvania The many Advantages which I derived from your Friendship Whilst in London have emboldened me to take the Liberty of recommending to your friendly Notice the Bearer of this Letter——my Brother who proposes to spend two Years in the Temple in Order to finish his studies in the Law. The Civilities you confer upon him will add greatly to the very many Obligations...
I enclose to you a small essay which I consider as a full reply to that part of your letter which defends the latin, and Greek languages.—I shall class them hereafter with negro slavery, & Spirituous liquors, & consider them as equally unfriendly tho’ in a less degree to the progress of morals—knowledge, & religion in the United States.—In a few days I shall reply to Other parts of your...
I enclose you a small publication which contains an account of a new auxillary or palliative remedy for madness. It will serve perhaps be acceptable to some of your medical friends. You will I have no doubt amuse yourself and your fire side by wishing that it could be applied for the relief of napoleon,—George the third, and all the mad federalists & democrats in our country.— From Dear Sir /...
Yrs. of June 21st. came safe to hand. I shall reply to it give you the echo of it in a few days. Not knowing to whom it is proper to send the enclosed packet from Lord Bircham, I have taken the liberty to address it to you. It contains (I suppose) a curious, heterogeneous oration by his Lordship delivered before some Americans in Edingh: on the Anniverrsary of General Washington’s birth day.—...
Wealth, respect and friendship! from your grateful and affectionate friend. War with the “great hammer of the whole earth” to use the words of which the prophet Jeremiah applied to the king of Babylon, is now the order of the day in Philada.— MHi : Adams Papers.
20 May 1809, Philadelphia. His son, Dr. James Rush, visits Washington to make a call upon the Madisons before he departs for Great Britain, where he will continue his medical studies. Asks JM to introduce young Rush to Mrs. Madison. RC ( DLC ). 1 p. Docketed by JM.
In Contemplating the facility with which our Once chaste & vi mistress “American liberty” admits embraces of some of the most profligate and unprincipled men in our Country, I feel disposed to address her in the Words of the Song. “I loved thee! beautiful and kind, And plighted an eternal vow, So altered are your face and mind, ’Twere perjury to love thee, now. ” MHi : Adams Papers.
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am much Obliged to you for Dr. Priestley’s Experiments. They have thrown a good deal of Light upon the subject of fixed Air, Altho’ I can by no means assent to some of his inferences from them. The Experiment made with a Sprig of mint extends our Ideas of the Oconomy of Vegetables. But is all the fixed Air which is discharged from its various sources...
Lancaster, 8 February 1778. RC ( Adams Papers ); printed : Benjamin Rush, Letters Letters of Benjamin Rush , ed. L. H. Butterfield, Princeton, 1951; 2 vols. , 1:199–200. Detailing some of his charges against Dr. Shippen, Rush complained that his alleged personal resentment was the congress’ excuse for not removing the director general of hospitals; therefore, “to restore harmony,” Rush felt...
AL (incomplete): American Philosophical Society I acknowledge myself much indebted to you for the Instruction contained in your last Letter. I have met with many Facts which confirm your Opinion of the Origin of Catarhs from Cloaths, Beds, Books &c. Baron Van Swieten in his last Volume of Commentaries on Dr. Boerhave’s Aphorisms in treating upon Epidemic Diseases mentions with Astonishment a...
With sincere Sympathy I sit down to inform you that this evening your amiable nephew expired. His Sufferings from the last Symptoms of his disease were much less than is common in similar Cases. I write this note in great haste, as the post office will close in a few minutes, and with a View that your brother may be stopped on his Way to Philadelphia. From Dear Sir yours truly and respectfully...
“Great men (says Lord Bacon) have neither Ancestors nor posterity.” This, you and I know is not the case with Writers. The enclosed pamphflett pamphflet is a proof that the passion for pen, ink and paper has descended in my family. It is written by my son Richard, who requests you will do him the honor to accept of a copy of it. Health, respect & friendship from / ever yours MHi : Adams Papers.
“salus, honor et bonus Appetitus.” to use the Words of Molière— from Dear sir ever / Yrs MHi : Adams Papers.
Letter not found. 6 September 1811. Acknowledged in JM to Rush, 20 Sept. 1811 . Forwards a copy of a pamphlet received from the earl of Buchan.
Philadelphia, 16 June 1785 . Introduces Samuel Fox, a descendant of “one of the most respectable Quaker families in Pennsylvania.” RC ( NNP ); 1 p. Recorded in SJL as received 1 Nov. 1785, “by Saml. Fox.”
“Arma, Cestusque”, parmamque “repono,” upon the offensive subject of one of my late letters to you.— I sincerely rejoice in the successful issue of the operation upon Mrs Smith’s breast. I would reciprocate your expressions of pleasure upon the appearances of a recussitation of the Spirit of 177 4 at Washington did I believe they would terminate in any thing but in upon Speeches, Embassies...
From the early Attachment of most of the gentlemen whose names I mentioned in my former letter, to Independance, I have little doubt of that Subject being talked off with great Affection in our return from Point no Point in the year 1775.— In consequence of the Contents of your last letter, I shall make no material alterations in your political Character. But I must hasten to the principal...
I enclose you four numbers of Duane’s paper. They contain a good deal of matter relative to the dispute between our Country & great Britain. I have not read a column of it, but it excites general attention in our city, and of course is probably worth the notice of a Man who has not, like myself, outlived his patriotism. My wife, Uncle Mr Boudinot and his daughter it is said, have lately paid a...
Your proposition for doing justice to the late Army of the United States becomes both popular & practicable in proportion as it is contemplated. Many people are Converts to it, who at first considered it as impracticable & impolitic. Among these I have reason to believe is A Gentleman from South Carolina who bore a decided part in the Opposition to you on the floor of Congress. He is a...
Has your right hand forgotten its Cunning from pain or Sickness? or have you ceased to contemplate the present interesting Crisis of your beloved Country?—or have you become fearful of committing your apprehensions of her future destiny to paper? If none of these events have come to pass, why am I not favoured with Answers to my two last letters?— Say my dear and venerable friend what is to be...
Yorktown, 22 January 1778. RC ( Adams Papers ); printed : Benjamin Rush, Letters Letters of Benjamin Rush , ed. L. H. Butterfield, Princeton, 1951; 2 vols. , 1:190–192. Whatever might be said about the graces needed at the French court, Rush praised the choice of the “perfectly honest” Adams as commissioner. Critical of American generalship, Rush yet dreaded the entry of France into the war...
The bearer of this letter Mr. Andrew Brown has applied to me as One among many witnesses of his zeal in promoting the Adoption of the fæderal constitution by means of his paper, and has requested me to add my testimony, of his faithful and meritorious services, to that of his Other friends . His sacrifices to his principles, and to the best interests of our Country have been great. The...
Every moment of Amusement that I am able to afford you, is an Addition to my happiness, for which reason I send you from time to time all such numbers of Duanes papers as contain any new Speculations upon the state of our Country.—The enclosed, is I suppose of that nature, for I have read its title only. Have you seen Sillimans travels int o England, Scotland & Holland? They are gener ally...
The enclosed publications should have been sent by your Son. The Account of Christr: Ludwick was written to fulfil an Old promise made many years ago, in case I should survive him. You will feel the patriotic Sentiments uttered by him. To the present calculating generation, they appear fanatical, and unintelligible.— I send you the Account of the successful use of Mercury in the Consumption,...
Your letter afforded me, and my distressed family great Consolation. It was much encreased by the friendly manner in which my dear and venerable friend Mr Adams received me last evening. The sentiments expressed (unfortunately to Mr Coxe) were Often you know communicated to Mr Adams in our free Conversations and letters upon titles , and forms and Government eight, or ten years ago. Indeed...
I have great pleasure in informing you that your nephew continues to exhibit all the marks of relief which he discovered on the evening After the Operation. His Spirits are much improved, and there is now more reason to expect his recovery, than there has been since he came to Philada: But the ultimate issue of his disease is still doubtful. His patience, and good Spirits are among the most...