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“Arma, Cestusque”, parmamque “repono,” upon the offensive subject of one of my late letters to you.— I sincerely rejoice in the successful issue of the operation upon Mrs Smith’s breast. I would reciprocate your expressions of pleasure upon the appearances of a recussitation of the Spirit of 177 4 at Washington did I believe they would terminate in any thing but in upon Speeches, Embassies...
Though late, I hope I am not among the last of your friends in congratulating you upon your escape from the high and dangerous appointment which your Country (to use the words of Lord Chesterfield ) inflicted upon you during the last eight years of your life.—Methinks I see you renewing your Acquaintance with your philosophical instruments, and with the friends of your Youth in your library —...
Your letters are full of aphorisms. Every paragraph in them suggests new ideas, or revives old ones. You have given a true picture of parties in our Country. We have indeed no national Character, and however much we boast of it, there are very few "true Americans" in the United States. We have four distinct parties in Pennsylvania. 1. old tories. 2. honest federalists. 3 violent democrats. 4....
I set down with great pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from Mr. Adams dated February 8th, with a poscript from you, which through a Mistake, or neglect in the post Offices did not reach me ’till the 10th. of this instant. I hope it is not too late to thank you for them both. The remedies you have demanded to releive the anguish of your mind occasioned by parting with your dear...
From the early Attachment of most of the gentlemen whose names I mentioned in my former letter, to Independance, I have little doubt of that Subject being talked off with great Affection in our return from Point no Point in the year 1775.— In consequence of the Contents of your last letter, I shall make no material alterations in your political Character. But I must hasten to the principal...
I enclose you four numbers of Duane’s paper. They contain a good deal of matter relative to the dispute between our Country & great Britain. I have not read a column of it, but it excites general attention in our city, and of course is probably worth the notice of a Man who has not, like myself, outlived his patriotism. My wife, Uncle Mr Boudinot and his daughter it is said, have lately paid a...
Your proposition for doing justice to the late Army of the United States becomes both popular & practicable in proportion as it is contemplated. Many people are Converts to it, who at first considered it as impracticable & impolitic. Among these I have reason to believe is A Gentleman from South Carolina who bore a decided part in the Opposition to you on the floor of Congress. He is a...
Has your right hand forgotten its Cunning from pain or Sickness? or have you ceased to contemplate the present interesting Crisis of your beloved Country?—or have you become fearful of committing your apprehensions of her future destiny to paper? If none of these events have come to pass, why am I not favoured with Answers to my two last letters?— Say my dear and venerable friend what is to be...
AL : American Philosophical Society Dr: Rush begs leave to inform Dr. Franklin that the members of the Canadian Committee will wait upon him this afternoon at 6 oClock at his own house. Addressed: Dr Franklin The committee was to hear Canadian petitions; its meetings determine the note’s possible dates. See Smith, Letters , IV , 537 n.
Yorktown, 22 January 1778. RC ( Adams Papers ); printed : Benjamin Rush, Letters Letters of Benjamin Rush , ed. L. H. Butterfield, Princeton, 1951; 2 vols. , 1:190–192. Whatever might be said about the graces needed at the French court, Rush praised the choice of the “perfectly honest” Adams as commissioner. Critical of American generalship, Rush yet dreaded the entry of France into the war...
The bearer of this letter Mr. Andrew Brown has applied to me as One among many witnesses of his zeal in promoting the Adoption of the fæderal constitution by means of his paper, and has requested me to add my testimony, of his faithful and meritorious services, to that of his Other friends . His sacrifices to his principles, and to the best interests of our Country have been great. The...
Every moment of Amusement that I am able to afford you, is an Addition to my happiness, for which reason I send you from time to time all such numbers of Duanes papers as contain any new Speculations upon the state of our Country.—The enclosed, is I suppose of that nature, for I have read its title only. Have you seen Sillimans travels int o England, Scotland & Holland? They are gener ally...
The enclosed publications should have been sent by your Son. The Account of Christr: Ludwick was written to fulfil an Old promise made many years ago, in case I should survive him. You will feel the patriotic Sentiments uttered by him. To the present calculating generation, they appear fanatical, and unintelligible.— I send you the Account of the successful use of Mercury in the Consumption,...
All the Coins are in readiness; and Subject to your order. At present no Opportunity of sending them to Petersburg offers from our city. Shall I send them to you by the post, put up in such a manner as to be mistaken for a small book? or will you request any one of your friends now in Congress to call for them on his way to massachussets next month? I have no Objection to the reading the dead...
Few events have happened since the 17th of Septemr: 1788, which have afforded more pleasure than your election to the Vice President’s chair. It is the cap–stone of our labors respecting the new government. Mr. Rutledge had some friends in Pennsylvania—but your friends prevailed. Mr. Wilson had great merit in this business. Mr. Morris likewise advised it. There is an expectation here which I...
I enclose to you a small essay which I consider as a full reply to that part of your letter which defends the latin, and Greek languages.—I shall class them hereafter with negro slavery, & Spirituous liquors, & consider them as equally unfriendly tho’ in a less degree to the progress of morals—knowledge, & religion in the United States.—In a few days I shall reply to Other parts of your...
Dont complain of my Wife. You have not a better friend, nor a great Admirer in the United States. She devours your letters. The reflection you have noticed, was aimed, not at the Subjects, but at the frequency of our letters. It was uttered with an Air of pleasantry, such as you have Often advised in your excellent Mr. Adams. The Anecdote I Alluded to respecting the fast day is as follows....
Your letter afforded me, and my distressed family great Consolation. It was much encreased by the friendly manner in which my dear and venerable friend Mr Adams received me last evening. The sentiments expressed (unfortunately to Mr Coxe) were Often you know communicated to Mr Adams in our free Conversations and letters upon titles , and forms and Government eight, or ten years ago. Indeed...
I have great pleasure in informing you that your nephew continues to exhibit all the marks of relief which he discovered on the evening After the Operation. His Spirits are much improved, and there is now more reason to expect his recovery, than there has been since he came to Philada: But the ultimate issue of his disease is still doubtful. His patience, and good Spirits are among the most...
The reduction—I will not say loss of Charlestown has produced a new Era in the politicks of America—Such as you and I saw—and felt—and admired in the years 1775 and 76. Our republic cannot exist long in prosperity. We require adversity, and appear to possess most of the republican Spirit when most depressed. The papers will inform you of the exploits of our governments—of our citizens—of our...
I return you the Copies of your letters to the Messrs Smith and thier Answers, with my Advice (as you have done me the honor to ask it) by no means to publish them . “Scandal (Dr Witherspoon used to say) will die sooner than you can kill it.” I can subscribe to the truth of this assertion of our Old Scotch Sachem from my own experience. Not a paragraph or even a line did I ever publish in...
The difficult and complicated labors of my professorship consisting of teaching, examining, reviewing theses &c &c being now nearly over, I sit down with great pleasure to pay my epistolary debts. You are my largest, and most lenient Creditor. The first dividend of my time of Course is due to you. I concur with you in your reflections upon the Western insurrection, but not altogether in your...
The hurry always connected with the prevalence of a yellow fever in our City; has prevented my answering your letter of Augst: 25th: at an earlier day. The opinion relative to too close an Alliance with France in the year 1776 was communicated to me by you I think for the first time in Baltimore. I was led from this circumstance to believe you had delivered it on the floor of Congress in that...
The time cannot be very distant when you and I must both sleep with our fathers. The distinguished figure you have made in life, and the high offices you have filled, will render your removal from the world, an object of universal Attention. Suppose you avail yourself while in health, of the sensibility of which awaits the public mind to your character soon after your death, by leaving behind...
My second son Richard Rush has long felt a strong desire to visit Europe in the capacity of a private Secretary to a foreign minister. He has been regularly educated to the profession of the law, and has began to do business in our city. His master Mr Lewis, & all his professional brethren speak in high terms of his knowledge and talents. His application to study has been unwearied. In...
Dr Rush presents his most respectful compliments to General Washington, and has the pleasure of sending him herewith a print of the celebrated Mr Napier, which was committed to the Doctors care, for the General, from the Right Honble the Earl of Buchan of Scotland. AL , DLC:GW . The response from Mount Vernon, dated 28 April, was: “General Washington presents his best compliments and thanks to...
Herewith you will receive a copy of my medical Inquiries and Observations upon the diseases of the mind. PS My bookseller has disappointed me in not sending me a Copy of my book which I intended for you. It shall follow this letter in a day or two.—I shall wait with solitude to receive your Opinion of them. They are in general accommodated the to the “Common Science” of Gentlemen of all...
I enclose you a humble tribute to the memory of our great republican and philosophical friend Mr. Rittenhouse. It is a feeble expression of respect for his Character compared with yours, in your defence of the genius of the Americans. Few such men have ever lived, or died in any Country. Accept of my Congratulations upon your election to the Vice President’s Chair of the United States, and...
I enclose you the letter I mentioned in my last, from the person whom I supposed to be your son in law. The letter from his son has been mislaid. I have neither friend, nor Correspondent in new york of the name of Wm Smith except your son in law, and having never before seen his hand writing, and supposing he had dropt Ste his middle name of Stephens, I had no doubt of the letter coming from...
I have no objection to your knowing that by the “great hammer of the earth” I meant Napoleon. George the 3rd: I believe to be the great hammer of the ocean. I consider them both as the scourges of the human race, and in the language of the souls under the altar, I feel disposed to cry day and night,—“how long—how long” O! Lord wilt thou suffer them to trample upon the rights of individuals and...