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Did you know how much folly and ignorance cleave to the character of the person, whose history you have required of his Physical habits, you would not have thought it of any consequence to know them. It will not be in my power to answer all your questions. I shall bearly inform you, that from necessity I conformed to the Spanish proverb of “being old when I was young, that I might be young...
I put the papers you sent me into the hands of Mr Carey. Some of them will be published in an Appendix to his history of the rise, and progress of the American Navy.—They shall all be returned to you in a few days.— I rejoice with you in the 5th: Naval Victory of our Country. The year 1812 will I hope be immortal in the history of this World for having given the first Check to the overgrown...
Permit me to intrude a few moments upon your time, while I address you upon a Subject interesting to humanity. A certain Peter Graham a Scotsman came into this Country about ten years ago. In the month of November 1810 he gave notice to the proper Office that he intended in the time appointed by law to become a Citizen of the United States. He is now married to the daughter of an American...
The enclosed letter to Dr Waterhouse contains the Welcome intelligence that his son has passed his examinations for a degree in our University with great honor, and that he will in a few weeks be created Doctor of Medicine. The documents you sent me relative to the Origins of the American Navy are now in the hands of Mr Carey who is heartily disposed to do ample justice to the early, uniform &...
soon After I became the Advocate of domestic Animals as far as related to thier diseases, in the lecture of which I sent you a copy, mr Carver applied to me to become his advocate with our Citizens for the purpose he has mentioned in his letter to you. His proposition at first struck me as humane & praise worthy, but in a short time Afterwards it appeared to me in the same light that it does...
I am now Attending a daughter of Mr Mathew Careys. In One of my Visits to her, I mentioned your Opinions to him upon the Subjects of a Navy, and your documents upon the Subject of its Origin in the United States. He requested a Sight and Copies of your letters containing those Opinions & documents for a publication which he expects Shortly to issue from his press. I said I could not comply...
The memorial of the “Pennsylvania Society for promoting the Abolition of Slavery &ca.” Respectfully sheweth. That notwithstanding the Laws which Congress have enacted inhibiting the Slave trade, as well as for the punishment of Citizens who may be concerned in the infraction of them, the inhuman, and unjust commerce, in African subjects, continues in defiance of those Laws, and in violation of...
It was wholly unnecessary to bring forward the respectable testimony of Mr Langdon in order to rectify the mistake into which Capt Barrys communication & Capt P Jones, journal had led me. You do me great injustice in supposing I possess a single Pennsylvania, or anti new England prejudice.—I know my native state too well. It is a great exchange filled with men of all nations who feel no...
I return you Col Smiths & Dr Waterhouse’s letters The former is replete with good Sense. Alas! the evils of party Spirit! It is a greater Curse to our country than our War with Great Britain. It sacrifices every to itself . Unless appointements are made hereafter with a more wise and impartial hand, our Union cannot last. I am afraid the app situation in the medical department of the Army...
The letter from Col: Smith to which you have alluded was not received with yours of this day. Was it withheld,? or was it lost by the way?—I was much pleased in seeing his Name upon record among the Successful Candidates for a Seat in Congress from the state of New York. The Air, the Society, and the great Objects which will occupy his mind in Washington will recussitate him, and Show his...
Having just now gotten my task, that is, revised my lecture, and added to it the results of my reading, and Observations during the last year, I now sit down to acknowledge the receipt of your three last very pleasant and entertaining letters. I shall begin my Answer to them by wishing you a happy new year!— I was much gratified with your Account of your Conversations at two late public...
Better and better! Dream on my venerable friend!—In one of the King of Prussias political letters to Voltaire written immediately after reading his Henriade, he tells him that he had dreamed that he had visited Elysium where he saw Homer and Virgil walking with dejected countenances. They were on their Way, they said, upon asking them what was the matter, to Minos, to ask permission to return...
You have so far outdreamed me in your last letter, that I shall be afraid hereafter to let my imagination loose in that Mode of exposing folly and Vice.—My whole family was delighted in contemplating you upon your rostrum in the Garden of Versailles, and in witnessing the effects of your Speech upon your hairy, featherd and scaly Audience. Let it not be said “De republica America fabula...
Gibbon tells us in his life, that he studied Anatomy & Chemistry on purpose to furnish himself with new Allusions for the Stile of his history. You seem to have studied natural history for the more important purpose of furnishing your memory with new precedents for industry and foresight in human Affairs, and particularly for the Conduct of Governments—But what avail reading, reflexion,...
Herewith you will receive a copy of my medical Inquiries and Observations upon the diseases of the mind. PS My bookseller has disappointed me in not sending me a Copy of my book which I intended for you. It shall follow this letter in a day or two.—I shall wait with solitude to receive your Opinion of them. They are in general accommodated the to the “Common Science” of Gentlemen of all...
My printer and my patients have kept me So busy for some Weeks past that I have fallen in Arrears to all my Correspondents. I Sit down with pleasure to discharge the first debt of that kind to my old friend of 1774. In my publication upon the diseases of the mind I have carefully avoided the Subject of the possessions in the New testament, also the Controversy about the nature of the mind. I...
I will say of the Wine which you have done me the favor to accept, What you said to me when I called to thank you for the Appointment you gave me in the Mint. “You have not more pleasure in receiving it, than I had in giving it to a faithful Old revolutionary Whig.” I hope the wine is of a good quality, and that it will assist the influence of the present times invigorating your body and Mind...
Your letter of August 1st is still unanswered. It is full of truth, and useful information and reflections. I regret that my son did not state the impressment of seamen being in 1807 an Act of the British Government. It would have obviated One of the Objections to the War by the Minority in Congress. Our Country is divided into two great parties called Fedarists and Democrats. The former are...
My son Ben sent me a quarter Cask of Old muscat Wine as a present from the Isle of Samos. The Vessel on board of which it was sent, to avoid Capture put into Boston where her Cargo is to be sold. I have requested Messrs Walley & Foster merchants of Boston to deliver it to your Order free of all Costs. I beg your Acceptance of it as a small Mark of the gratitude and friendship of Dear Sir /...
The paternal farm which I visited on the 11th: of last month, lies two miles further from Philadelphia than the honorable Cottage where you once did me and my brother the honor to take a family dinner with my dear and Venerable mother. She purchased and retired to it After She gave up business in Philadelphia. I had seen my native place but once since I was Six years old, and that but for a...
During the revolutionary War I kept notes and preserved pamphlets with a view to write memoirs of it. From the immense difference in my facts and opinions from those that were current and popular, I was sure if I had published them they would not have been believed, and would moreover have exposed me & my posterity to persecution. I therefore burnt all my notes (the characters of the gentlemen...
Will you bear to read a letter that has nothing in it About politicks or War?—I will, without waiting for an answer to this question, trespass upon your patience by writing you one upon Another Subject. I was called on Saturday last to visit a patient About nine miles from Philadelphia. Being a holiday, I took my youngest son with me to drive me instead of my black Servant. After visiting my...
It is now a time of uncommon health in our city, insomuch that I spend six or seven hours of every day, including the evenings, at my desk. I mention this fact to apollogize for the promptness with which I reply to your letters. I sent your letter of this Yesterday morning to my son Richard in order that he may correct from it, the mistake I made in the name of the British minister whose...
We both owe too much to our Wives to differ with them, and perhaps there never was a time when they are were so necessary to our happiness.—Of mine I can truly say in the words of the Scotch song, “There naw luck abut the hoose when Julia is awa’”—Let us therefore submit to thier badinage, while they submit to us in greater matters, & let us continue to treat them as our best friends. No man...
Dont complain of my Wife. You have not a better friend, nor a great Admirer in the United States. She devours your letters. The reflection you have noticed, was aimed, not at the Subjects, but at the frequency of our letters. It was uttered with an Air of pleasantry, such as you have Often advised in your excellent Mr. Adams. The Anecdote I Alluded to respecting the fast day is as follows....
In Spite of a Speech made by my wife a few days Ago, “that you and I corresponded like two young girls about their sweethearts,” I will not be outdone by you in the number and promptness of my letters. The General assembly of the Presbyterian Church have just finished a long and interesting Session. Among Other things done by them, they have addressed a petition to Congress praying that the...
Stephen Gerard came to Philada from France About thirty years ago in the capacity of a Sailor. Having had some education, and possessing a strong mind, he soon became a master of a Vessel, afterwards a merchant by which employment he has amassed an estate of five millions of dollars, one million of which was in Stock of the late bank of the United States, the rest is in houses, lots, Ships &...
You remind me by your wish for a copy of all the lyes that were published against you by your political enemies, of a similar wish by Dr Franklin—he said he should “like to paper his study with them”. Some of his most virulent calumniation he said were persons from whom he had received letters full of gratitude for favors Conferred upon them,—which letters were then in his possession.—Where...
Your two letters of yesterday & to day have made me serious. They discover a profound knowledge of times past, present & to come. I have directed one of my daughters to copy two sentences from your letter of this day to be sent to my son Richard at Washington who, poor fellow! is swamped in a beleif of the infallibility and perpetuity of the “powers that are”. I know he reveres your judgment....
I return you the Copies of your letters to the Messrs Smith and thier Answers, with my Advice (as you have done me the honor to ask it) by no means to publish them . “Scandal (Dr Witherspoon used to say) will die sooner than you can kill it.” I can subscribe to the truth of this assertion of our Old Scotch Sachem from my own experience. Not a paragraph or even a line did I ever publish in...
In giving the history of the Controversies in which I was engaged in the military hospitals, and from which I suffered Abuse, and incurred the lasting resentment of the Character you allow you in your last letter, I neglected to mention in addition to the Change which my resignation produced in the expenses and Order of the military hospitals, that my Zeal and Sufferings in behalf of the sick...
Your favor of the 20 th instant came safe to hand, but not accompanied with the pamphflet you have mentioned in it. I have read your letter to M r Adams
I once met Mr Sawbridge at the house of his Sister Mrs McCaulay in London. In speaking of some of the public men who had for a number of years conducted the Affairs of the British Nation, he said “the only difference between the Duke of New Castle, and the Earl of Chatham was the former in thier Choice of Officers to execute thier plans, was—the former preferred a grave fool—the latter a...
In a letter which I received a few days ago from M r Adams , he informs with a kind of exultation , that After a correspondence of five or six & thirty years had been interrupted by various Causes, it had again be been renewed, and that four letters had passed between you & himself. him . In speaking of your letters he says “they are written with all the elegance, purity and Sweetness of Style...
I began a long & confidential letter to you two weeks ago upon the Subject of one of your late letters, but an unusual pressure of business has prevented my finishing it. Judge of my the nature & extent of my engagements, when I add, that after lecturing twice, and visiting my normal number of patients this day, and entertaining some of my pupils at tea, I have since written six Answers to...
I did not require the anecdote you have communicated to me in your letter of last month to know that I had incurred the hatred of General Washington. It was violent & descended with him to the grave. For its not being perpetuated in the history of his life, I am indebted to the worthy and amiable Judge Washington. I will give you a history of its cause in as short a Compass as possible. During...
Few eforts of the Acts of my life have given me more pleasure than the one you are pleased to acknowledge in your last letter . I wish in your reply to M r Adams’s letter you had given him the echo of his Communications to you respecting his daughter M rs Smith and her husband
“Arma, Cestusque”, parmamque “repono,” upon the offensive subject of one of my late letters to you.— I sincerely rejoice in the successful issue of the operation upon Mrs Smith’s breast. I would reciprocate your expressions of pleasure upon the appearances of a recussitation of the Spirit of 177 4 at Washington did I believe they would terminate in any thing but in upon Speeches, Embassies...
During the time Cobbett was abusing me in his newspaper to the great joy of a number of our tory Citizens, I met Hamilton Roan in a family in which I was called to see a patient. We had met before at Major Butlers table. He took me by the hand in the most cordial manner. “Our situation said I Mr Roan is a good deal alike in Philada—We are both in an enemy’s country.” “no Sir ” (said he)—“I am...
Yours of Decem r 5 th came to hand yesterday. I was charmed with the Subject of it. In order to hasten the object you have suggested I sat down last evening, and selected such passages from your letter as contained the kindest expressions of regard for m r Adams and transmitted them to him. my letter to him which contained them , was concluded as nearly as I can recollect, for I kept no Copy...
Mr Jefferson and I exchange letters Once in six, nine or twelve Months. This day I received a few lines from him in which he introduces your Name in the following Words. After mentioning the Visit paid to you by his two neighbours—the Messrs Coles last summer he adds, “Among Other things he [Mr Adams] adverted to the unprincipled licenciousness of the press against myself—adding— I always...
You have touched me in a sore place in your letter of the 4th instant. My Son Richard has accepted of the Office of Comptroller General, and is about to remove with his family to Washington in the Course of this month. Both his parents, all his brothers and Sisters—his Uncles Rush & Richd Stockton, and all his professional and personal friends remonstrated against it. I painted to him in as...
Alas! What a difference between your last, and former letters!—Instead of being charmed with the effusions of your vigorous highly cultivated Understanding and sportive imagination, your letter of the 2nd of Novr contains nothing but accounts of “graves & tombs” and “dust converted into paper,” and of “sorrows written with rainy eyes upon the bosom of the earth.”—It affected me in the most...
All my family rejoice with yours in the happy issue of the operation performed upon Mrs Smiths breast. The enclosed letter is intended as an answer to her’s to me, and to serve the further purpose of exciting in her a belief that her Cure will be radical & durable. I consider her as rescued from a premature grave. Since my last letter to you it has pleased God to make all my family very happy...
I shall begin my letter by replying to your daughters. I prefer giving my Opinion & Advice in you her Case in this way. You and Mrs Adams may communicate it gradually and in such a manner as will be least apt to distress and alarm her. After the experience of more than 50 years in cases similar to hers, I must protest agst: all local applications, and internal medicines for her relief. They...
Letter not found. 6 September 1811. Acknowledged in JM to Rush, 20 Sept. 1811 . Forwards a copy of a pamphlet received from the earl of Buchan.
I am two letters in your debt. To the last I shall reply first. I am not satisfied with any one of your objections to my proposal of a posthumous Address from you to the Citizens of the United States. The “good that men do lives after them” the evil they have done or the evil that has been unjustly imputed to them generally perishes in descends into the grave with them. I have lately met with...
I sit down thus early to answer your pleasant and friendly letter from your Forest , from with a desire to administer to your relief from your present indisposition. There shall not be single theory in my prescriptions, & what will be more grateful to you, all of them Shall be derived from the resources of empiricism.—The following remedies have been found useful in similar Cases. I shall...
The time cannot be very distant when you and I must both sleep with our fathers. The distinguished figure you have made in life, and the high offices you have filled, will render your removal from the world, an object of universal Attention. Suppose you avail yourself while in health, of the sensibility of which awaits the public mind to your character soon after your death, by leaving behind...
It is possible Dr Franklins estate, when sold, in Order to be divided, may not produce the Sum mentioned in my last letter. It consists chiefly of real property, purchased in same the early part of his life. The improvements in our City have given it its present immense Value. It is said the million of livres committed to him to be employed in secret Services to his Country, were divided...