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You may tell your friend Mr Cranch that I included my Correspondent among the men who were so prominent in madness as to undertake the Cure of the madness of mankind by Appeals to their Reason. I have been a fellow labourer with you in this irrational business. But we will console ourselves with the comfortable reflection that we have aimed well. Were we to live our lives over again, and...
The 4th of July has been celebrated in Philada: in the manner I expected. The military men, and particularly one of them, ran away with all the glory of the day. Scarcely a word was said of the solicitude and labors, and fears, and sorrows and sleepless nights of the men who projected, proposed, defended, and Subscribed the declaration of independance. Do you recollect your memorable speech...
Yrs. of June 21st. came safe to hand. I shall reply to it give you the echo of it in a few days. Not knowing to whom it is proper to send the enclosed packet from Lord Bircham, I have taken the liberty to address it to you. It contains (I suppose) a curious, heterogeneous oration by his Lordship delivered before some Americans in Edingh: on the Anniverrsary of General Washington’s birth day.—...
Act 1. Scene 2nd. Mr Adams alone in his Study. Enter B Rush. A: Aye Rush is that you? What is that paper you hold in your hand? R A Summary view of the physical, moral and immoral effects of certain hymns upon the body & mind of man & upon his Condition in Society. Permit me Sir to request your Acceptance of it. A What must I do with it? R: Send it to the parson of your parish, but if he “too...
I enclose you another Attempt to combat a greater enemy to the prosperity and liberties of the United states , than the fleets of Britain and the Armies of Bonaparte . It is intended to catch the eye of the Common people—upon the doors of School houses, Court houses and Churches. For this purpose suppose it were republished in your state. Bishop Madison would I have no doubt concur in it, for...
Act I. Scene I. Mr: Adams’s Study Mr A: Who is there? Dr: R—a friend— A—Walk in.—Ah! Rush is that you? Where have been these two Months—? You seem to have forgotten your old friend Adams. R. Forgotten my Old friend Adams!—No Sir—that is impossible. I owe more to your friendship than I ever owed to any human Being, except to my excellent mother, and to my beloved and faithful Wife. A. What is...
30 March 1811, Philadelphia. Introduces the bearers, Mr. Caldwell and Major Plenderleath, who were introduced to him as gentlemen of “uncommon worth” by his son-in-law in Quebec. They hold, respectively, civil and military commissions under the British government. On their travels in the U.S. they wish “to do homage to the person and Character of the President of the United States.” RC ( DLC...
Herewith th r ough the politeness of Mr Quincy you will receive the Coins for your son. I regret that some of them are not recently coined. None such have been issued lately from the mint. Your Son Thomas’s friend Mr Erving has paid me for them. Permit me to Congratulate you upon your Son John’s honourable Appointment to a Seat upon the bench of the United States. It gives great Satisfaction...
All the Coins are in readiness; and Subject to your order. At present no Opportunity of sending them to Petersburg offers from our city. Shall I send them to you by the post, put up in such a manner as to be mistaken for a small book? or will you request any one of your friends now in Congress to call for them on his way to massachussets next month? I have no Objection to the reading the dead...
I was much gratified in reading the confidential Communication made to me in your letter . After reading the Correspondence which accompanied it, I acquit you, of in your refusal to renew it, of the least impropriety of temper, or Conduct. On the Contrary, I was delighted with the kindness, benevolence, and even friendship discovered in your Answers to M rs Adams letter. I beleive they were...
With sincere Sympathy I sit down to inform you that this evening your amiable nephew expired. His Sufferings from the last Symptoms of his disease were much less than is common in similar Cases. I write this note in great haste, as the post office will close in a few minutes, and with a View that your brother may be stopped on his Way to Philadelphia. From Dear Sir yours truly and respectfully...
I thank you for you son’s pamphlet. Much as I loath political discussions of all kinds, I was induced by your request, and my great respect for the genius of its author, to read it. with I thank you for the pleasure I derived from it. It is a masterly performance overflowing with argument & eloquence. He places Mr Ames where he ought to have been placed stood in the meredian of his political...
Soon After I received your last & Affectionate letter , I was called upon to witness a most distressing Scene have been visited by a deep domestic Affliction. m My eldest son was brought home to me from new Orleans in a state of melancholy derangement brought on induced
I write to you at the request of your nephew to acknowledge for him the receipt of your letter sent under cover of mine. He is upon the Whole better, but as yet not in a condition to employ his pen. There has been a second discharge of a fluid from his breast induced by a spontaneous opening of the puncture made by Dr Physick. He has been releived by it. We are using remedies to prevent a...
We read of Hurricane Months in the West Indies. Men of business are exposed to them no less than the West India islands. I am now in the height of Mine. For a few minutes only, I have torn my eyes from the tumultuous Scenes that surround me & turned them towards Woolaston in Massachusets. I see you in your Arm Chair—surrounded by your family. How do you do? And you! good madam—the faithful...
I have great pleasure in informing you that your nephew continues to exhibit all the marks of relief which he discovered on the evening After the Operation. His Spirits are much improved, and there is now more reason to expect his recovery, than there has been since he came to Philada: But the ultimate issue of his disease is still doubtful. His patience, and good Spirits are among the most...
I have great pleasure in informing you that the operation I mentioned in my letter of Friday was this day performed upon your nephew, and with the happiest result. I refer you to Dr Physick’s letter for the particulars of it. The only design of this hasty note is [to] comply with my promise, and to inform you that I shall this evening at the request of your nephew communicate the news of the...
Agreeably to your request I have in conjunction with my friend Dr Physick done every thing that I could for the relief of your nephew, but I am sorry to add—as yet without Success. We have in vain attempted to salivate him. In consequence of the failure of that, and Other remedies, we have concluded in a day, or two to make a small puncture in his breast in order to discharge the Water from...
I have the honor to send you herewith the 4th report of the directors of the African institution in London and an adjudication of an appeal connected with the African trade, both of which appear to contain matter highly interesting to the National honor of the United States. Can nothing be done to wipe away the Stain that has been brought upon our moral and national character by the infamous...
I enclose you a small publication which contains an account of a new auxillary or palliative remedy for madness. It will serve perhaps be acceptable to some of your medical friends. You will I have no doubt amuse yourself and your fire side by wishing that it could be applied for the relief of napoleon,—George the third, and all the mad federalists & democrats in our country.— From Dear Sir /...
Hate on, & call upon all the pedagouges in Massachussets to assist you with their hatred of me, but and I will after all, continue to say, that it is folly and madness to spend four or five years in teaching boys the latin & greek languages.— I admit a knowledge of the Hebrew to be useful to divines, also as much of the greek as will enable them to read the greek testament, but the latin is...
Mr Denny is the principal writer in the portfolio. He is precluded from introducing politicks into it by its proprietor Mr Sam Bradford, but—not from traducing the works of Whig, and American Authors. One of his Coajutors is a Dr Chapman a former pupil of mine and who owes me many—very many Obligations. He is the son of a Virginia Tory. After failing in getting into business, and suspecting...
In Contemplating the facility with which our Once chaste & vi mistress “American liberty” admits embraces of some of the most profligate and unprincipled men in our Country, I feel disposed to address her in the Words of the Song. “I loved thee! beautiful and kind, And plighted an eternal vow, So altered are your face and mind, ’Twere perjury to love thee, now. ” MHi : Adams Papers.
I have no objection to your knowing that by the “great hammer of the earth” I meant Napoleon. George the 3rd: I believe to be the great hammer of the ocean. I consider them both as the scourges of the human race, and in the language of the souls under the altar, I feel disposed to cry day and night,—“how long—how long” O! Lord wilt thou suffer them to trample upon the rights of individuals and...
Wealth, respect and friendship! from your grateful and affectionate friend. War with the “great hammer of the whole earth” to use the words of which the prophet Jeremiah applied to the king of Babylon, is now the order of the day in Philada.— MHi : Adams Papers.
Every moment of Amusement that I am able to afford you, is an Addition to my happiness, for which reason I send you from time to time all such numbers of Duanes papers as contain any new Speculations upon the state of our Country.—The enclosed, is I suppose of that nature, for I have read its title only. Have you seen Sillimans travels int o England, Scotland & Holland? They are gener ally...
In One of my letters written some time ago, I informed you that my eldest son had killed a brother officer and a friend in a duel at New Orleans. The distress and remorse which followed this event deprived him of his reason, and threw him into the marine hospital where he has been nearly ever since the duel. In the month of Feby: last he arrived in Philada in a state of deep melancholy &...
With this letter you will receive a bundle of Auroras, and another of the same size by the post of the next day—They are filled very much of late with our state politicks, but you will find many Columns still filled with complaints against Great Britain—so my son Richard tells me, for I assure you I have not read a Column in any one of them these six months. My wife asked me a few days ago...
Accept of my thanks for your last letter.—I enclose you a few numbers of the Aurora. Shall we descend in a Calm or a storm to the our Graves? We are told your son is gone to Petersburg to put a torch to the flame of War, and that we are to be Allies of France and of all the powers on the Baltic in it. Mr Jackson has just left our city. He has been visited & entertained by Some of our first...
Philadelphia Decemr: 5th: 1809 I picked up some time ago a magazine in which I met with a revival of the Old controversy concerning the divine Origin of Episcopal and Presbyterian Ordination carried on by Dr Hobart and Dr Mason of New York. After reading a few pages of it, I threw down the magazine with disgust, and committed the enclosed thoughts upon that Subject to paper. The partiality you...
Who were the ancestors and posterity of Homer, Demosthenes, Plato and Aristotle? who were the ancestors and posterity of Cicero, Horace and Virgil? Were any of them philosophers, orators or poets? who were the ancestors and posterity of Walsingham Sully, Malborough and Wolfe? Were any of them statesmen generals, or heroes? I do not ask whether they were descended from gentlemen, or whether...
My Son Richard Rush has requested me to beg the favor of you to accept of the enclosed pamphflet upon the Administration of Justice in Pennsylvania. At the same time, receive Dear Sir a copy of three lectures upon Animal life extracted from a new edition of my medical inquiries now in the press, a Mark of the great regard, of your sincere & Affectionate Old friend RC ( DLC ). Docketed by JM....
“Great men (says Lord Bacon) have neither Ancestors nor posterity.” This, you and I know is not the case with Writers. The enclosed pamphflett pamphflet is a proof that the passion for pen, ink and paper has descended in my family. It is written by my son Richard, who requests you will do him the honor to accept of a copy of it. Health, respect & friendship from / ever yours MHi : Adams Papers.
Although for many years past I have read nothing, but books upon medicine on week days, & upon Religion on Sundays, and have expected to continue to do so as long as I lived, yet you have almost persuaded me to read Fox’s history of James the Second. Your praise of it is enough for me, for I know how much your habits of reading and thinking qualify you to judge of the merit of books that...
I enclose you four numbers of Duane’s paper. They contain a good deal of matter relative to the dispute between our Country & great Britain. I have not read a column of it, but it excites general attention in our city, and of course is probably worth the notice of a Man who has not, like myself, outlived his patriotism. My wife, Uncle Mr Boudinot and his daughter it is said, have lately paid a...
I send you herewith some more of Col Duane’s papers. You will perceive in One of them proposals for republishing you letters in a pamphflet. It was from a Conviction that you saw things with Other eyes than most of the persons that cooperated with you in establishing the Independance of the United states, and that your Opinions and Conduct would bear the Scrutiny of posterity at that eventful...
“salus, honor et bonus Appetitus.” to use the Words of Molière— from Dear sir ever / Yrs MHi : Adams Papers.
I enclose you three numbers of Duane’s papers that you may see in what manner the late news from St James’s has operated upon one Class of our Citizens. Your Communications Continue to excite Attention. A general wish prevails among those who read them, that they may be preserved & perpetuated in the form of a pamphlet, or of a larger Work. My Wife and youngest daughter left me on the 8th of...
My son Richard who has been a customer for the Aurora ever since he lived at the Jersey College, after reading your last letter, brought the enclosed papers from his office, and requested me to forward them to you. I have lately met with an account of the brain of Voltaire being preserved by a Lady in a France, and showed to her friends as an object of affection and adoration. The author of...
20 May 1809, Philadelphia. His son, Dr. James Rush, visits Washington to make a call upon the Madisons before he departs for Great Britain, where he will continue his medical studies. Asks JM to introduce young Rush to Mrs. Madison. RC ( DLC ). 1 p. Docketed by JM.
I am much pleased with the Specimen you have given of the Use of your Wings upon a certain Subject in your last letter. Your publications in the newspapers show still further how important to the public, to posterity, and to your family honor are the words you have preserved of your political life. Your defence of the rights of our Seamen is much admired. It discovers with the Experience &...
Though late, I hope I am not among the last of your friends in congratulating you upon your escape from the high and dangerous appointment which your Country (to use the words of Lord Chesterfield ) inflicted upon you during the last eight years of your life.—Methinks I see you renewing your Acquaintance with your philosophical instruments, and with the friends of your Youth in your library —...
It would be well, if legislators were taught before they begin to legislate, that there are certain things which elude the power of government as certainly as a stone when thrown into the Air falls to the ground. In addition to those Subjects which have been mentioned in our letters I will add—“the dictates of Conscience, religious & philosophical opinions—the current prices of goods, and...
The Medical Professors of the University of Pennsylvania beg leave to address you upon a Subject highly interesting to the honor, and interest of the United States. It has been the practice of the Professors, ever since the establishment of the University, to give Certificates to the Students who have required them, of their having attended their respective lectures. These Certificates are not...
When a young man I read Sidney upon government. In one of his Chapters, he agitates the following question—“Whether A civil War, or slavery be the greatest evil” and decides in favor of the Latter. In ing and revolving that Subject in my mind, I have been led to suppose there are evils more afflicting and injurious to a Country than a foreign War. The principal evil of War is death. Now Vice I...
Retired as I live from the political World, and devoted as I am Obliged to be to the duties of my profession, I have not been an indifferent Spectator of the events Which have elevated you to the Chair of the United States. Permit me to express, not only the pleasure I feel in common with a great majority of your fellow Citizens, but to unite my Congratulations with those of your early and...
Your favor of the 19th. of February was alike acceptable with all your former letters. The papers will inform you that our government is about to yeild to the Clamors of your part of the United States against the Embargo laws. Had our Legislators been better historians they would have promptly saved their honor, and preserved the peace of our Country. Augustus repealed a law to compel...
Soon after the receipt of your last letter in which you Advise me to shake off my retired habits and prejudices, and to come forward in Support of the petitions of my fellow Citizens for a repeal of the Embargo laws, I went to bed at my usual hour, and dreamed that I had yeilded to your Advice; and in consequence of it, determined to appear at a federal town meeting which was to be held the...
In a situation such as you have seen a Sea Captain in a Gale of Wind, I sit down to acknowledge the receipt of your two last instructing letters. Present events will justify your opinion of the present measures of our rulers. Your Account of the pernicious influence of a belief in the time in Which the prophesies are to be fulfilled is to much opposed to the System of the divine government...
Has your right hand forgotten its Cunning from pain or Sickness? or have you ceased to contemplate the present interesting Crisis of your beloved Country?—or have you become fearful of committing your apprehensions of her future destiny to paper? If none of these events have come to pass, why am I not favoured with Answers to my two last letters?— Say my dear and venerable friend what is to be...