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ALS : University of Pennsylvania The many Advantages which I derived from your Friendship Whilst in London have emboldened me to take the Liberty of recommending to your friendly Notice the Bearer of this Letter——my Brother who proposes to spend two Years in the Temple in Order to finish his studies in the Law. The Civilities you confer upon him will add greatly to the very many Obligations...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am much Obliged to you for Dr. Priestley’s Experiments. They have thrown a good deal of Light upon the subject of fixed Air, Altho’ I can by no means assent to some of his inferences from them. The Experiment made with a Sprig of mint extends our Ideas of the Oconomy of Vegetables. But is all the fixed Air which is discharged from its various sources...
AL (incomplete): American Philosophical Society I acknowledge myself much indebted to you for the Instruction contained in your last Letter. I have met with many Facts which confirm your Opinion of the Origin of Catarhs from Cloaths, Beds, Books &c. Baron Van Swieten in his last Volume of Commentaries on Dr. Boerhave’s Aphorisms in treating upon Epidemic Diseases mentions with Astonishment a...
AL : American Philosophical Society Dr: Rush begs leave to inform Dr. Franklin that the members of the Canadian Committee will wait upon him this afternoon at 6 oClock at his own house. Addressed: Dr Franklin The committee was to hear Canadian petitions; its meetings determine the note’s possible dates. See Smith, Letters , IV , 537 n.
I have just now learned from General Mifflin that your Excellency intends to take the field in a few days. I hope your Excellency will excuse the liberty I am about to take in Suggesting that your troops will probably suffer from being so early exposed in an encampment. The variable weather of the Spring and fall have always been found much more destructive to the health of an Army than the...
In Observing the different operation of Whig principles upon different people, I have been led to divide the Whigs of America into the five following classes 1st the Whig from a love of power. 2 The Whig from resentment. 3 The Whig from interest, 4 The Whig from a love of the military life, and lastly the Whig from the love of liberty. I have my eye upon men who belong to each of these...
It would have given me great pleasure to have Spent an hour with you in this place After my return from Genl. Howe’s camp. I could have told you but little of the loss of the enemy on the heights of Bradywine for I confined my Questions to Subjects more interesting to my country, and which were solved without difficulty or restraint. Let us leave to common Soldiers the joy that arises from...
I have little to add to the long letter I wrote to you a few days ago, but that the event of the battle at Germantown on the 4th instant was full of proofs of the truths I formerly communicated to you. We lost a city—a Victory—a campaign by that want of discipline and System which pervades every part of the army. General Conway wept for joy when he saw the Ardor with which our troops pushed...
I fear you will class me with the weeping philosophers of antiquity, but I cannot help it. He who can be happy while his country is wasting her blood, and treasure to no purpose must be more or less than a man. General Gates’ unparalled success gave me great pleasure, but it has not obliterated the remembrance of the disorders I have seen in the army in this department. On the contrary I am...
The disorders of our Army do not proceed from any natural faults in our men. On the contrary I believe the people of America (especially the Natives) are the most tractable Creatures in the world. I Can say with great certainty that I have never yet been disobeyed in a single instance by a Virginian or a New England man in any connection with them in the hospital. I speak therefore from...
I have delayed troubling your Excellency with the State of our hospitals, in hopes you would hear it from the Director General whose business it is to correspond with your Excellency upon this Subject. I beg leave therefore at last to look up to you, and through you to the congress as the only powers that can redress our greivances, or do us justice. I need not inform your Excellency that we...
Yorktown, 22 January 1778. RC ( Adams Papers ); printed : Benjamin Rush, Letters Letters of Benjamin Rush , ed. L. H. Butterfield, Princeton, 1951; 2 vols. , 1:190–192. Whatever might be said about the graces needed at the French court, Rush praised the choice of the “perfectly honest” Adams as commissioner. Critical of American generalship, Rush yet dreaded the entry of France into the war...
Lancaster, 8 February 1778. RC ( Adams Papers ); printed : Benjamin Rush, Letters Letters of Benjamin Rush , ed. L. H. Butterfield, Princeton, 1951; 2 vols. , 1:199–200. Detailing some of his charges against Dr. Shippen, Rush complained that his alleged personal resentment was the congress’ excuse for not removing the director general of hospitals; therefore, “to restore harmony,” Rush felt...
I should think myself inexcusable in leaving the army by resigning my commission without informing your Excellency that I was compelled to that measure by the prevalence of an opinion among some people that the distresses and mismanagement of the hospitals arose from a “want of harmony” between Dr Shippen, and myself. next to the conviction of my own mind that this was not the case, I wish to...
I set down with great pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from Mr. Adams dated February 8th, with a poscript from you, which through a Mistake, or neglect in the post Offices did not reach me ’till the 10th. of this instant. I hope it is not too late to thank you for them both. The remedies you have demanded to releive the anguish of your mind occasioned by parting with your dear...
Your letter written a few days before your embarkation from for France, lays me under an Obligation to renew my correspondence with you. You are pleased to say my letters give you pleasure. This is eno’ for me. Happy shall I esteem myself if thro’ your eminent and useful Station I can convey a single idea that will add a mite to the happiness of our beloved country. Many new events have...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The inclosed letter to Mr Coxe is from one of his family.— I have taken the liberty of addressing it to your care. Your conveying it safely to Mr Coxe will Oblige a worthy family, and Sir Your most Hble Servant Addressed: The Honble: / Benjamin Franklin Esqr: / Minister Plenipotentiary / from the / United States at / the Court of Versailles. Endorsed: Dr...
The same Opinion of your Abilities and Zeal for our country which made me rejoice in your accepting of an embassy to France, leads me to rejoice with most of your countrymen in your Safe return to your native Shores. I am sure you cannot be idle nor unconcerned ’till the Vessel in which our All is embarked is safely moored. We stand in greater Need than ever of men of your principles. You may...
Accept of my thanks for your early and puntual Attention to my letter. I have ever thought myself honoured in your friendship, and shall be happy at all times in cultivating a correspondence with you. In your first letter you enquire after the state of our goverment. The best answer I can give to your Question, is that I am Afraid to commit my Opinion of men and measures in our state to...
I cannot help troubling you with a second Answer to your letters on purpose to congratulate you upon the Success of your Schemes for prosecuting the war in the Southern states. Count D’Estang has done wonders. He will be acknowledged by posterity as one of the deliverers of our country. We have just heard that he is safely arrived with all the trophies of his American conquests off the Capes...
This letter will be handed to you by Dr. John Foulke (a Graduate in our University) a young gentleman of a respectable Quaker family who goes to France to finish his Studies in Medicine. He is a youth of a fair character, and promising Abilities, and friendly to the liberties of his country. It gave me great pleasure to hear of your safe Arrival, and favourable reception in Spain. We long to...
The reduction—I will not say loss of Charlestown has produced a new Era in the politicks of America—Such as you and I saw—and felt—and admired in the years 1775 and 76. Our republic cannot exist long in prosperity. We require adversity, and appear to possess most of the republican Spirit when most depressed. The papers will inform you of the exploits of our governments—of our citizens—of our...
Behold the fruits of the french Alliance! Our young men no longer look upon Great Britain as their home or Mother Country, but turn their eyes entirely to France for all the purposes of business and knowledge. The bearer of this letter Mr. Wm. West —a young merchant of excellent character, and of a respectable Quaker family waits upon you with a proof of this assertion, I beg leave to...
The discovery of Arnold’s treachery, and the new Bennington Affair in the South, have given fresh hopes and Spirits to the Whigs. We had forgotten former deliverances under our late losses and mortifica­ tions. But we now find that providence is on our Side, and that our independance is as secure as the everlasting mountains. We have discovered at last that God means that we should live only...
Your favor of Sepr. 20 from Amsterdam came safe to hand. The contents of it were of so important a nature that I took the liberty of publishing them in our newspapers. They were known from the republican and liberal Spirit of the sentiments, to be yours, and were well received by the public. I am happy in finding that your once unpopular name, now gives weight to opinions and measures not only...
AL : American Philosophical Society Dr Rush’s most respectful compliments to his venerable father, and friend Benjamin Franklin Esqr &c and begs the favor of him to forward the enclosed letters to the persons to whom they are addressed.— He has left one of them open for the Doctors perusal—in which he will see that the good old cause continues to flourish under the auspices of heaven and our...
The bearer Mr. George Harrison intends to spend a few years in a compting house in Amsterdam. He is the son of a Gentleman who once filled the first office of magistracy in our city, and his family still maintain the first rank among us. The Revd. Mr. White whose political Character and whose office as Chaplain to Congress I presume are well known to you is his Brother in law. I beg your...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I profitted so much by your kindness and conversation while I was abroad that I cannot refuse an Application from a young Student for a letter of introduction to you in order that he may assist in obtaining your Mantle and transporting it to your Native country before you leave our world.— The bearer Dr Saml Griffitts has genius and an insatiable desire for...
Accept of my congratulations upon the Success of your negociations at the Hague. Your countrymen are not insensible of your Zeal and industry in effecting the important event of a connection with the States of Holland. Our hearts vibrate with the hearts of those honest republicans whose petitions and memorials opened the eyes of their rulers to acknowledge our independance. The tories...
AD (draft) and press copy of copy: American Philosophical Society In May, 1783, an essay about an uncommonly healthy and long-lived Philadelphian appeared in the Gentleman’s Magazine under the title “Reflections upon the Life and Death of Edward Drinker, of the City of Philadelphia, who died on the 17th of November, 1782, in the 103d Year of his Age. Written by an ingenious literary Gentleman...
Dr. Rush’s Compliments to Mr. Jefferson and sends him herewith a packet for Mr. B: Vauhan to whom he has taken the liberty of introducing Mr. Jefferson as a fellow worshipper in the temple of Science. Mr: Vauhan is a gentlemen of knowledge and taste in Science, and possesses a most extensive acquaintance among the literati in London. Dr. Rush wishes Mr. Jefferson a safe voyage, and a...
Philadelphia, 16 June 1785 . Introduces Samuel Fox, a descendant of “one of the most respectable Quaker families in Pennsylvania.” RC ( NNP ); 1 p. Recorded in SJL as received 1 Nov. 1785, “by Saml. Fox.”
Dr Rush presents his most respectful compliments to General Washington, and has the pleasure of sending him herewith a print of the celebrated Mr Napier, which was committed to the Doctors care, for the General, from the Right Honble the Earl of Buchan of Scotland. AL , DLC:GW . The response from Mount Vernon, dated 28 April, was: “General Washington presents his best compliments and thanks to...
I received a small quantity of the mangel wurzel or Scarcity root Seeds a few days ago from Dr Lettsom of London. In distributing these Seeds among the friends of Agriculture in this country, I should have been deficient in duty, and patriotism, to have neglected to send a small portion of them to your Excellency. The pamphflet which accompanies the Seeds will furnish your Excellency with a...
Permit an old friend to congratulate you upon your Safe Arrival in your native country. I rejoiced in reading, of the respectful manner in which you were received by your fellow Citizens. You serve a grateful & enlightened people. May you long continue to enjoy their confidence, & may they long - very long continue to enjoy the benefits of your patriotism & knowledge. I have to thank you for...
A worthy friend of mine, & formerly my pupil Dr Rodgers has lately removed from our city to New York. Permit me to solicit a small share of your extensive influence in his favor. I do not expect that former medical connections should be given up to serve him. It will be eno’ from you—if when his name is mentioned in company you bear a testimony from his old preceptor that he is a gentleman of...
Your affectionate and instructing letter of Decemr 2nd. did not reach me ‘till yesterday. I Embrace with my Affections, as well as my judgement that form of Government which you have proved from so many Authorities, to be the only One that can preserve political happiness. It was my attachment to a constitution composed of three branches, that first deprived me of the Confidence of the Whigs...
Few events have happened since the 17th of Septemr: 1788, which have afforded more pleasure than your election to the Vice President’s chair. It is the cap–stone of our labors respecting the new government. Mr. Rutledge had some friends in Pennsylvania—but your friends prevailed. Mr. Wilson had great merit in this business. Mr. Morris likewise advised it. There is an expectation here which I...
From the influence as president of the Senate, and a citizen of Massachusetts, that you will have in the Councils of our nation, I have taken the liberty of addressing a few thoughts to you upon the subject of the residence of the Congress of the United States. 1. The active and useful part which the Eastern states have taken in the establishment of our independance & new government, and the...
Accept of my sincere congratulations upon your arrival in New York, and upon your advancement to the second honor in the United States.— Your influence in the Senate over which you have been called to preside, will give you great weight (without a vote) in determining upon the most suitable characters to fill the first offices in government. Pennsylvania looks up with anxious Solicitude for...
Inasmuch As I never mean to solicit an Office of any kind under Congress for myself, I am induced to solicit with the more boldness, Appointments for my friends. Never have I undertook that business in favor of a person of more merit than the bearer of this letter Mr: Peter Baynton—a gentleman of connections, once among the first in our State for Rank and property, and who stands very high in...
I find you, & I must agree , not to disagree , or we must cease to discuss political questions. I could as soon believe that the British parliament had once a right to tax America, as believe that the a fourth major part of the citizens of New York were federal , or that many of the federal minority were so, from proper motives. I know from good authority that some of the leading federalists...
I have been so long accustomed to regard all your opinions upon government with reverence, that I am was disposed upon reading your last letter, to relate suspend my belief in republican systems of political happiness; but a little reflection led me again to adopt them, and upon this single principle, that they have never had a fair tryal. Let us try what the influence of general science &...
I enclose to you a small essay which I consider as a full reply to that part of your letter which defends the latin, and Greek languages.—I shall class them hereafter with negro slavery, & Spirituous liquors, & consider them as equally unfriendly tho’ in a less degree to the progress of morals—knowledge, & religion in the United States.—In a few days I shall reply to Other parts of your...
From an unfortunate concurrence of circumstances, I find myself under the influence of the same difficult command in corresponding with the Vice President of the United States, which the King of Syria gave to the Captains of his chariots.— "Fight ye not with small or great, save only with the King of Israel."— The subjects upon which we differ are monarchy — titles —& the Latin & Greek...
Altho’ we differ in our Opinions About the Latin and Greek languages, and some Other matters of perhaps less consequence, yet we both agree in the propriety & duty of rewarding old & faithful servants of the public. Mr And: Brown who will have the honor of delivering you this letter belongs to that class of worthy citizens. He goes to new york to Solicit an Appointment Under the federal...
Ever since the last week in Octobr I have been engaged in composing & delivering a new course of lectures on the theory & practice of Medicine in the College of this city. This arduous business has confined employed me so closely that it has separated me from my friends,—detatched me from all Other pursuits—and—what I regret most of all, has deprived me for the a while of the pleasure of your...
I expected that the establishment of the federal Goverment, and the reformation of the Constitution of Pennsylvania would have gratified all my wishes for the prosperity of my Country, and have left me to enjoy in private life the pleasures of science and professional pursuits. But I find I cannot be an indifferent Spectator of the great Question which now agitates your house. It involves in...
Your remarks upon the conduct of the tories, and the “young fry” who are now crowding into the Councils of our Country, perfectly accord with my own observations. The present convention & assembly of Pennsylvania, and the present Corporation of Philada: are all filled chiefly with men who were either unknown in 1776, or known only for timidity or disaffection. Your old friends have mingled...
In answer to your polite letter, I have only to repeat my congratulations to you for the honor you have done to the claims of justice and patriotism by your motion. The small number of the minority that rose to support it, does not lessen its merit. The decision upon that great Question will leave a stain upon our Country which no time nor declammation can ever wipe away. History will decide...