You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Rush, Benjamin
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Rush, Benjamin" AND Recipient="Madison, James"
Results 1-28 of 28 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Permit me to intrude a few moments upon your time, while I address you upon a Subject interesting to humanity. A certain Peter Graham a Scotsman came into this Country about ten years ago. In the month of November 1810 he gave notice to the proper Office that he intended in the time appointed by law to become a Citizen of the United States. He is now married to the daughter of an American...
The memorial of the “Pennsylvania Society for promoting the Abolition of Slavery &ca.” Respectfully sheweth. That notwithstanding the Laws which Congress have enacted inhibiting the Slave trade, as well as for the punishment of Citizens who may be concerned in the infraction of them, the inhuman, and unjust commerce, in African subjects, continues in defiance of those Laws, and in violation of...
Letter not found. 6 September 1811. Acknowledged in JM to Rush, 20 Sept. 1811 . Forwards a copy of a pamphlet received from the earl of Buchan.
30 March 1811, Philadelphia. Introduces the bearers, Mr. Caldwell and Major Plenderleath, who were introduced to him as gentlemen of “uncommon worth” by his son-in-law in Quebec. They hold, respectively, civil and military commissions under the British government. On their travels in the U.S. they wish “to do homage to the person and Character of the President of the United States.” RC ( DLC...
With sincere Sympathy I sit down to inform you that this evening your amiable nephew expired. His Sufferings from the last Symptoms of his disease were much less than is common in similar Cases. I write this note in great haste, as the post office will close in a few minutes, and with a View that your brother may be stopped on his Way to Philadelphia. From Dear Sir yours truly and respectfully...
I write to you at the request of your nephew to acknowledge for him the receipt of your letter sent under cover of mine. He is upon the Whole better, but as yet not in a condition to employ his pen. There has been a second discharge of a fluid from his breast induced by a spontaneous opening of the puncture made by Dr Physick. He has been releived by it. We are using remedies to prevent a...
I have great pleasure in informing you that your nephew continues to exhibit all the marks of relief which he discovered on the evening After the Operation. His Spirits are much improved, and there is now more reason to expect his recovery, than there has been since he came to Philada: But the ultimate issue of his disease is still doubtful. His patience, and good Spirits are among the most...
I have great pleasure in informing you that the operation I mentioned in my letter of Friday was this day performed upon your nephew, and with the happiest result. I refer you to Dr Physick’s letter for the particulars of it. The only design of this hasty note is [to] comply with my promise, and to inform you that I shall this evening at the request of your nephew communicate the news of the...
Agreeably to your request I have in conjunction with my friend Dr Physick done every thing that I could for the relief of your nephew, but I am sorry to add—as yet without Success. We have in vain attempted to salivate him. In consequence of the failure of that, and Other remedies, we have concluded in a day, or two to make a small puncture in his breast in order to discharge the Water from...
I have the honor to send you herewith the 4th report of the directors of the African institution in London and an adjudication of an appeal connected with the African trade, both of which appear to contain matter highly interesting to the National honor of the United States. Can nothing be done to wipe away the Stain that has been brought upon our moral and national character by the infamous...
My Son Richard Rush has requested me to beg the favor of you to accept of the enclosed pamphflet upon the Administration of Justice in Pennsylvania. At the same time, receive Dear Sir a copy of three lectures upon Animal life extracted from a new edition of my medical inquiries now in the press, a Mark of the great regard, of your sincere & Affectionate Old friend RC ( DLC ). Docketed by JM....
20 May 1809, Philadelphia. His son, Dr. James Rush, visits Washington to make a call upon the Madisons before he departs for Great Britain, where he will continue his medical studies. Asks JM to introduce young Rush to Mrs. Madison. RC ( DLC ). 1 p. Docketed by JM.
The Medical Professors of the University of Pennsylvania beg leave to address you upon a Subject highly interesting to the honor, and interest of the United States. It has been the practice of the Professors, ever since the establishment of the University, to give Certificates to the Students who have required them, of their having attended their respective lectures. These Certificates are not...
Retired as I live from the political World, and devoted as I am Obliged to be to the duties of my profession, I have not been an indifferent Spectator of the events Which have elevated you to the Chair of the United States. Permit me to express, not only the pleasure I feel in common with a great majority of your fellow Citizens, but to unite my Congratulations with those of your early and...
Agreeably to your request, I have written to General Armstrong in favor of my friend Dr. Clark. I enclose my letter to you, to be forwarded to him by the first Conveyance that offers to France. I cannot conclude my letter without expressing my sympathy with you in the arduous labors to which the present State of our Country has exposed You, nor can I refrain from communicating to you the great...
The letter you did me the favor to enclose me a few days ago is from a Dr: Thomas Clark- a British physician of great respectability Who is now a prisoner upon parole at Vendun in France. He has long contemplated becoming a Citizen of the United States, through part of which he passed a few years ago on his Way from the East Indies to Great Britain at Which time I became acquainted with him....
§ From Benjamin Rush. 7 April 1806, Philadelphia. “The bearer Captain John McDougall goes to Washington in order to solicit the humanity of our Government. He carries with him ample testimonies of his integrity, and particularly of his innocence in a transaction which has lately endangered the loss of his Ship. I have known him for many years, and have reason to believe him to be a man of high...
Many years have passed away since I have read a political pamphflet. The Subject, and name of the author of the one which You have done me the honor to send me will force me from my habits of neglect of such publications. My son is now devouring it. It is spoken of in all the Circles in our city with the highest praise and admiration. Connected with our present controversy with Great Britain...
§ From Benjamin Rush. 3 December 1805, Philadelphia. “To a person acquainted with the great events which characterised the first years of the French Revolution, it might be sufficient barely to say—the bearer of this letter is General Miranda. But much more may be said of him. He is still the friend the [ sic ] liberty, and a beleiver in the practicability of governments that shall have for...
My second son Richard Rush has long felt a strong desire to visit Europe in the capacity of a private Secretary to a foreign minister. He has been regularly educated to the profession of the law, and has began to do business in our city. His master Mr Lewis, & all his professional brethren speak in high terms of his knowledge and talents. His application to study has been unwearied. In...
Permit me to revive a friendship, Once very dear to me, by addressing you upon a Subject highly interesting to the United States. The Commerce of our Country has suffered greatly by our Absurd Quarantine laws in the different States. These laws which admit the contagious nature of Our american yellow fever, have produced a reaction in the Governments of Europe which has rendered our Commerce...
Count Andreani is just such a man as you have described him to be in your letter. Is it not disgraceful to our Country to suffer its natural productions to be explored & described only by foreigners? Are we safe in committing so important a part of our history to men who are imperfectly acquainted with our language, and who from receiving their first impressions of us thro’ the Medium of...
Your proposition for doing justice to the late Army of the United States becomes both popular & practicable in proportion as it is contemplated. Many people are Converts to it, who at first considered it as impracticable & impolitic. Among these I have reason to believe is A Gentleman from South Carolina who bore a decided part in the Opposition to you on the floor of Congress. He is a...
… [Encloses a pamphlet with the request] that you would not suffer it to go out of your hands without guarding against the possibility of its finding its way into a newspaper.… I shall next week send four or five copies of it to Mr. Jefferson. [Also encloses] Dr. Price’s Sermon preached before the Revolution Society in London.… It suggested to me an idea of your house addressing the national...
I congratulate you upon the prospect of the funding System being delayed ’till the next session of Congress. I hope an election will intervene, before you meet again. Should this be the case, I think it probable that no One of our members who has voted against your motion, & in favor of the leading principles of Mr Hamilton’s report will be reelected. I have long deplored the temporary...
I once knew a Swedish Clergyman in this city, who told me that when he preached in the Country, he always studied his Congregation first , and Afterwards his sermon. Something like this Should be done by legislators. They should perfectly understand the character of the people whom they represent, and Afterwards suit their laws to their habits and principles. I suspect the present Congress...
In answer to your polite letter, I have only to repeat my congratulations to you for the honor you have done to the claims of justice and patriotism by your motion. The small number of the minority that rose to support it, does not lessen its merit. The decision upon that great Question will leave a stain upon our Country which no time nor declammation can ever wipe away. History will decide...
I expected that the establishment of the federal Goverment, and the reformation of the Constitution of Pennsylvania would have gratified all my wishes for the prosperity of my Country, and have left me to enjoy in private life the pleasures of science and professional pursuits. But I find I cannot be an indifferent Spectator of the great Question which now agitates your house. It involves in...