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AD (draft) and press copy of copy: American Philosophical Society In May, 1783, an essay about an uncommonly healthy and long-lived Philadelphian appeared in the Gentleman’s Magazine under the title “Reflections upon the Life and Death of Edward Drinker, of the City of Philadelphia, who died on the 17th of November, 1782, in the 103d Year of his Age. Written by an ingenious literary Gentleman...
Philadelphia, 16 June 1785 . Introduces Samuel Fox, a descendant of “one of the most respectable Quaker families in Pennsylvania.” RC ( NNP ); 1 p. Recorded in SJL as received 1 Nov. 1785, “by Saml. Fox.”
Dr Rush presents his most respectful compliments to General Washington, and has the pleasure of sending him herewith a print of the celebrated Mr Napier, which was committed to the Doctors care, for the General, from the Right Honble the Earl of Buchan of Scotland. AL , DLC:GW . The response from Mount Vernon, dated 28 April, was: “General Washington presents his best compliments and thanks to...
I received a small quantity of the mangel wurzel or Scarcity root Seeds a few days ago from Dr Lettsom of London. In distributing these Seeds among the friends of Agriculture in this country, I should have been deficient in duty, and patriotism, to have neglected to send a small portion of them to your Excellency. The pamphflet which accompanies the Seeds will furnish your Excellency with a...
Permit an old friend to congratulate you upon your Safe Arrival in your native country. I rejoiced in reading, of the respectful manner in which you were received by your fellow Citizens. You serve a grateful & enlightened people. May you long continue to enjoy their confidence, & may they long - very long continue to enjoy the benefits of your patriotism & knowledge. I have to thank you for...
A worthy friend of mine, & formerly my pupil Dr Rodgers has lately removed from our city to New York. Permit me to solicit a small share of your extensive influence in his favor. I do not expect that former medical connections should be given up to serve him. It will be eno’ from you—if when his name is mentioned in company you bear a testimony from his old preceptor that he is a gentleman of...
Your affectionate and instructing letter of Decemr 2nd. did not reach me ‘till yesterday. I Embrace with my Affections, as well as my judgement that form of Government which you have proved from so many Authorities, to be the only One that can preserve political happiness. It was my attachment to a constitution composed of three branches, that first deprived me of the Confidence of the Whigs...
Few events have happened since the 17th of Septemr: 1788, which have afforded more pleasure than your election to the Vice President’s chair. It is the cap–stone of our labors respecting the new government. Mr. Rutledge had some friends in Pennsylvania—but your friends prevailed. Mr. Wilson had great merit in this business. Mr. Morris likewise advised it. There is an expectation here which I...
From the influence as president of the Senate, and a citizen of Massachusetts, that you will have in the Councils of our nation, I have taken the liberty of addressing a few thoughts to you upon the subject of the residence of the Congress of the United States. 1. The active and useful part which the Eastern states have taken in the establishment of our independance & new government, and the...
Accept of my sincere congratulations upon your arrival in New York, and upon your advancement to the second honor in the United States.— Your influence in the Senate over which you have been called to preside, will give you great weight (without a vote) in determining upon the most suitable characters to fill the first offices in government. Pennsylvania looks up with anxious Solicitude for...
Inasmuch As I never mean to solicit an Office of any kind under Congress for myself, I am induced to solicit with the more boldness, Appointments for my friends. Never have I undertook that business in favor of a person of more merit than the bearer of this letter Mr: Peter Baynton—a gentleman of connections, once among the first in our State for Rank and property, and who stands very high in...